Mary Lou Jepsen

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pages: 501 words: 114,888

The Future Is Faster Than You Think: How Converging Technologies Are Transforming Business, Industries, and Our Lives by Peter H. Diamandis, Steven Kotler

Ada Lovelace, additive manufacturing, Airbnb, Albert Einstein, Amazon Mechanical Turk, augmented reality, autonomous vehicles, barriers to entry, bitcoin, blockchain, blood diamonds, Burning Man, call centre, cashless society, Charles Lindbergh, Clayton Christensen, clean water, cloud computing, Colonization of Mars, computer vision, creative destruction, crowdsourcing, cryptocurrency, Dean Kamen, delayed gratification, dematerialisation, digital twin, disruptive innovation, Edward Glaeser, Edward Lloyd's coffeehouse, Elon Musk, en.wikipedia.org, epigenetics, Erik Brynjolfsson, Ethereum, ethereum blockchain, experimental economics, food miles, game design, Geoffrey West, Santa Fe Institute, gig economy, Google X / Alphabet X, gravity well, hive mind, housing crisis, Hyperloop, indoor plumbing, industrial robot, informal economy, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Internet of things, invention of the telegraph, Isaac Newton, Jaron Lanier, Jeff Bezos, job automation, Joseph Schumpeter, Kevin Kelly, Kickstarter, late fees, Law of Accelerating Returns, life extension, lifelogging, loss aversion, Lyft, M-Pesa, Mary Lou Jepsen, mass immigration, megacity, meta analysis, meta-analysis, microbiome, mobile money, multiplanetary species, Narrative Science, natural language processing, Network effects, new economy, New Urbanism, Oculus Rift, out of africa, packet switching, peer-to-peer lending, Peter H. Diamandis: Planetary Resources, Peter Thiel, QR code, RAND corporation, Ray Kurzweil, RFID, Richard Feynman, Richard Florida, ride hailing / ride sharing, risk tolerance, Satoshi Nakamoto, Second Machine Age, self-driving car, Silicon Valley, Skype, smart cities, smart contracts, smart grid, Snapchat, sovereign wealth fund, special economic zone, stealth mode startup, stem cell, Stephen Hawking, Steve Jobs, Steven Pinker, Stewart Brand, supercomputer in your pocket, supply-chain management, technoutopianism, Tesla Model S, Tim Cook: Apple, transaction costs, Uber and Lyft, uber lyft, unbanked and underbanked, underbanked, urban planning, Watson beat the top human players on Jeopardy!, We wanted flying cars, instead we got 140 characters, X Prize

(Author note: Peter’s VC firm is an investor.) Exo Imaging’s AI-enabled, cheap, handheld ultrasound 3-D imager: Exo recently emerged from stealth with a $35 million raise. Read the full press release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20190805005114/en/Exo-Imaging-Emerges-Stealth-Mode-35M-Series|. See also: https://www.exo-imaging.com/. (Author note: Peter’s VC firm is an investor.) Mary Lou Jepsen’s startup, Openwater: Mary Lou Jepsen gave a TED Talk about Openwater that you can find here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=awADEuv5vWY. See also: https://www.openwater.cc/about-us. (Author note: Peter’s VC firm is an investor.) Apple’s fourth-generation iWatch: Read Apple’s full press release here: https://www.apple.com/newsroom/2018/09/redesigned-apple-watch-series-4-revolutionizes-communication-fitness-and-health/.

The list of once multimillion-dollar medical machines now being dematerialized, demonetized, democratized, and delocalized—that is, made into portable and even wearable sensors—could fill a textbook. Consider the spectrum of possibilities. On the whiz-bang side, there’s Exo Imaging’s AI-enabled, cheap, handheld ultrasound 3-D imager—meaning you will soon be able to track anything from wound healing to fetus growth from the comfort of your home. Or former Google X project leader Mary Lou Jepsen’s startup, Openwater, which is using red laser holography to create a portable MRI equivalent, turning what is today a multimillion-dollar machine into a wearable consumer electronics device and giving three-quarters of the world access to medical imaging they currently lack. Yet simpler developments might be more revolutionary. In less than two decades, wearables have gone from step-counting first-generation self-trackers to Apple’s fourth-generation iWatch that includes an FDA-approved ECG scanner capable of real-time cardiac monitoring.


pages: 294 words: 96,661

The Fourth Age: Smart Robots, Conscious Computers, and the Future of Humanity by Byron Reese

agricultural Revolution, AI winter, artificial general intelligence, basic income, Buckminster Fuller, business cycle, business process, Claude Shannon: information theory, clean water, cognitive bias, computer age, crowdsourcing, dark matter, Elon Musk, Eratosthenes, estate planning, financial independence, first square of the chessboard, first square of the chessboard / second half of the chessboard, full employment, Hans Rosling, income inequality, invention of agriculture, invention of movable type, invention of the printing press, invention of writing, Isaac Newton, Islamic Golden Age, James Hargreaves, job automation, Johannes Kepler, John Maynard Keynes: Economic Possibilities for our Grandchildren, John Maynard Keynes: technological unemployment, John von Neumann, Kevin Kelly, lateral thinking, life extension, Louis Pasteur, low skilled workers, manufacturing employment, Marc Andreessen, Mark Zuckerberg, Marshall McLuhan, Mary Lou Jepsen, Moravec's paradox, On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres, pattern recognition, profit motive, Ray Kurzweil, recommendation engine, Rodney Brooks, Sam Altman, self-driving car, Silicon Valley, Skype, spinning jenny, Stephen Hawking, Steve Wozniak, Steven Pinker, strong AI, technological singularity, telepresence, telepresence robot, The Future of Employment, the scientific method, Turing machine, Turing test, universal basic income, Von Neumann architecture, Wall-E, Watson beat the top human players on Jeopardy!, women in the workforce, working poor, Works Progress Administration, Y Combinator

For instance, the neuroscientist David Eagleman has developed ways for the deaf to “hear” by using sound waves to trigger vibrations in different parts of a tight-fitting vest. After a while, the person “hears” in the sense that he or she doesn’t have to step by step decode the pressure, but instead is able to do it unconsciously. Eagleman believes that eventually the deaf will hear the same way that the nondeaf hear. The rate at which we are learning about the brain is increasing. One amazing example is the work being done by the technology pioneer Mary Lou Jepsen. She has developed a system in which brain scans are taken of people while they are being shown a series of YouTube videos. A computer records their brain activity alongside what video is being shown. Then later, the test subjects are shown new videos, and the computer has to figure out what they are seeing based on their brain activity. The results are incredible. It works. Not perfectly, but it works.