Charles Lindbergh

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pages: 502 words: 125,785

The Arsenal of Democracy: FDR, Detroit, and an Epic Quest to Arm an America at War by A. J. Baime

banking crisis, British Empire, Charles Lindbergh, Ford paid five dollars a day, Henry Ford's grandson gave labor union leader Walter Reuther a tour of the company’s new, automated factory…, housing crisis, interchangeable parts, Louis Blériot, mass immigration, means of production, Silicon Valley, strikebreaker

. [>] Harry Bennett sent his men: Harry Bennett, as told to Paul Marcus, Ford: We Never Called Him Henry (New York: Tom Doherty Associates, 1987), p. 263. 17. Will It Run?: Spring to Fall 1942 [>] “I have seen the science”: Charles Lindbergh, Of Flight and Life (New York: Scribner’s, 1948), p. 51. [>] “I want to contribute”: Charles Lindbergh, The Wartime Journals of Charles A. Lindbergh (New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1970), pp. 566–67. [>] “He is a ruthless and conscious”: A. Scott Berg, Lindbergh (New York: Berkley Books, 1999), p. 436. [>] “The plant has progressed”: Lindbergh, The Wartime Journals, p. 608. [>] “acres upon acres of machinery”: Ibid., p. 613. [>] “The Ford schedule calls”: Ibid., p. 609. [>] “The rest of the industry”: Ibid., p. 610. [>] “There is no question”: Charles Lindbergh, “The Future of the Large Bomber,” unpublished memo, April 10, 1942, Lindbergh Papers, Manuscripts and Archives Division, Yale University Library, New Haven, CT. [>] “the man who first put”: Ford Times, November 12, 1943. [>] “I am so anti-Hun and anti-Jap”: S.

He realized for the first time that his choice for the bomber plant location had been a massive, irrevocable mistake. He had a health crisis brewing, and there seemed no way to stop it. 17 Will It Run? Spring to Fall 1942 I have seen the science I worshiped, and the aircraft I loved, destroying the civilization I expected them to serve. —CHARLES LINDBERGH AT 12:30 PM ON March 24, 1942, a train screeched into Michigan Central Station in Detroit, bound from Boston. From a Pullman car, Charles Lindbergh stepped onto the siding with a suitcase in his hand. The platform appeared crowded. All over the country, urban train stations were symbolic microcosms of America in wartime—everyone in a hurry to get somewhere, teeming crowds, a great migration, most notably fresh-faced boy-men in military uniform. Increasingly, there would be more Americans on crutches in train stations, in wheelchairs, or in coffins making their final journey home.

In his post-trip press conference, surrounded by the White House press corps, he had little to say about Willow Run, except this: like the war itself, Ford’s bomber experiment was not going exactly as planned. Willow Run was “not yet in production.” 20 A Dying Man Fall 1942 to Winter 1943 This hour I rode the sky like a god, but after it was over, how glad I would be to go back to earth and live among men, to feel the soil under my feet and to be smaller than the mountains and trees. —CHARLES LINDBERGH CIRCLING THE SKIES OVER Willow Run in the flight deck of a B-24, Charles Lindbergh worked through a series of maneuvers with a copilot beside him. He had probably piloted a wider array of flying machines than any American. But he’d never flown an airplane as uncomfortable—nor any that required as much pure arm strength—as a B-24 Liberator. It was like flying “a 1930s Mack truck,” as one aviation historian put it. The wheel in the cockpit connected to a system of cables mounted on pulleys within the body of the airplane that activated the flight controls (ailerons, rudders, and elevators).


How to Make a Spaceship: A Band of Renegades, an Epic Race, and the Birth of Private Spaceflight by Julian Guthrie

Albert Einstein, Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic, Ayatollah Khomeini, Berlin Wall, Charles Lindbergh, cosmic microwave background, crowdsourcing, Doomsday Book, Elon Musk, fear of failure, Frank Gehry, gravity well, high net worth, Iridium satellite, Isaac Newton, Jacquard loom, Jeff Bezos, Johannes Kepler, Leonard Kleinrock, life extension, low earth orbit, Mark Shuttleworth, Menlo Park, meta analysis, meta-analysis, Murray Gell-Mann, Oculus Rift, orbital mechanics / astrodynamics, packet switching, Peter H. Diamandis: Planetary Resources, pets.com, private space industry, Richard Feynman, Richard Feynman: Challenger O-ring, Ronald Reagan, side project, Silicon Valley, South of Market, San Francisco, stealth mode startup, stem cell, Stephen Hawking, Steve Jobs, urban planning

In the late 1800s, Tsiolkovsky wrote about the effects of zero gravity on the body, predicted the need one day for pressure suits for space travel, developed Russia’s first wind tunnel, envisioned rockets fueled by a mixture of liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen, and developed the mathematical formula for changes in a rocket’s momentum and velocity.* Peter also read about Robert Goddard, the American physicist who built and launched the world’s first liquid-fueled rocket in 1926, an event likened in significance to the Wright brothers’ flight at Kitty Hawk. Goddard was ridiculed when he stated his belief that a big enough rocket could one day reach the Moon, but he drew support from aviator Charles Lindbergh. Peter appreciated how Goddard’s rocket experiments as an undergraduate at the Worcester Polytechnic Institute yielded explosions and smoke that sent professors running for fire extinguishers. Peter learned about German physicist Hermann Oberth, also a believer in liquid-fueled rockets over solid-fuel rockets, and another German, Wernher von Braun, father of the Saturn V, which came out of his work for Nazi Germany on the V-2 ballistic missile during World War II.* Peter knew that if it weren’t for von Braun and his group of German engineers, the United States would not have reached the Moon by the end of the 1960s.

Aviation experts gave the Voyager little chance of success, because of the compromises Burt had made in its design and construction, and because his aim was nothing less than to double an aviation record that had stood for almost a quarter century. There was every reason to believe the Voyager would land for no other reason than pilot exhaustion. This was a test of flying skill, physical endurance, and breakthrough design. Just as Charles Lindbergh had done with the Spirit of St. Louis in 1927, Burt had pared down the Voyager to its lightest possible weight. The in-flight tools, whether wrenches or screwdrivers, were hollowed out. The top of the plane got only a light coat of white paint, to keep the structure cool in the hot desert sun. The plane’s skin consisted of only two layers of graphite fiber composite, with a paper honeycomb in between.

The twenty-one-year-old closed his eyes and inhaled the cold air, knowing the day ahead would be anything but calm. Erik’s goal on this early August morning in 1986 was to summit the 14,411-foot mountain, the highest peak in the Cascade Range. Climbing Rainier wouldn’t be a history-making event like his grandfather’s plane flight, the 1927 journey across the Atlantic to Paris that made Charles Lindbergh a hero and at the time arguably the most famous man on Earth. But—for now—scaling Rainier would be Erik’s Paris, his milestone. He was intent on staying clear of anything too predictably “Lindberghian.” A friend was trying to persuade him to get his pilot’s license, but Erik found it way too obvious. Family members had learned to fly, but no one was a pilot. The only flying Erik planned to do was off the cornices at his favorite ski mountains.


pages: 577 words: 171,126

Light This Candle: The Life & Times of Alan Shepard--America's First Spaceman by Neal Thompson

Charles Lindbergh, Columbine, cuban missile crisis, Donald Trump, MITM: man-in-the-middle, Norman Mailer, place-making, Silicon Valley, William Langewiesche

8 - “That little rascal” Part II - INTO SPACE 9 - “We made them heroes, the first day they were picked” 10 - Eyeballs in, eyeballs out 11 - “A harlot of a town” 12 - “I think I got myself in trouble” 13 - “We had ’em by the short hairs, and we gave it away” 14 - “Light this candle!” 15 - “I believe we should go to the moon” 16 - “I’m sick . . . should I just hang it up?” 17 - How to succeed in business without really fllying—much 18 - “Captain Shepard? I’m Charles Lindbergh” 19 - “What’s wrong with this ship?” Part III - AFTER SPACE 20 - “When you’ve been to the moon, where else are you going to go?” 21 - “I saw a different Alan Shepard, completely different” 22 - “This is the toughest man I’ve ever met” NOTES BIBLIOGRAPHY Acknowledgments About the Author Copyright Page For Mary Man must rise above the Earth—to the top of the atmosphere and beyond—for only thus will he fully understand the world in which he lives.

He’d finish lessons before the other kids and sit fiddling at his desk, distracted and fitful, itching to pull his harmonica out of the flip-top desk. So she often assigned him extra work: a paper on James Fenimore Cooper’s The Last of the Mohicans (on which he got an A), a report on the Middle Ages (B+), a stamp collection. When Shepard was eleven, Wiggins asked him to write and bind his own book, and he decided it was time to compose his autobiography. At the time, Alan had become enamored of Charles Lindbergh and kept on his bedside table a copy of Lindbergh’s autobiography, We. In a show of how strong Shepard’s ego had already become by age eleven, the book was titled “Me.” Later, as a test pilot and astronaut, Shepard would need to absorb huge amounts of highly technical information, and could often do so without needing to write things down—a capacity he credited to Mrs. Wiggins. “Mrs. Wiggins was tough,” Shepard recalled for a reporter many years later, adding that she had seemed “eight feet tall.”

He even had a determined manner of walking—instead of following sidewalks, Shepard usually walked quickly and in a straight line, stepping over shrubs and across lawns to get where he was going. But as a boy, the most distinctive sign of that determination was his precocious fascination with—and pursuit of—flying airplanes, an interest that bordered on obsession. Even without his historic flight across the Atlantic in 1927, stories of Charles Lindbergh’s aerial daredevilry were enough to thrill a generation of boys like Shepard, who collected airplane magazines and read and reread Lindbergh’s autobiography, We. We recounted Lindbergh’s earlier adventures, such as barn-storming from town to town in his open-cockpit biplane, offering $5 sightseeing flights, dropping straw-filled dummies from his plane, or even standing on a wing while a copilot flew.


pages: 371 words: 101,792

Skygods: The Fall of Pan Am by Robert Gandt

airline deregulation, Ayatollah Khomeini, Berlin Wall, Charles Lindbergh, collective bargaining, hiring and firing, invisible hand, Maui Hawaii, RAND corporation, Tenerife airport disaster, yield management, Yogi Berra, Yom Kippur War

To Juan Trippe, jets meant faster travel, lower fares, more passengers, expanding airlines—and thus profit. Why did the Primitives never understand that? Charles Lindbergh was Trippe’s advance scout. Even before the war was over, while he was still working for Pratt & Whitney, Lindbergh had entered collapsing Germany to sniff out secret new developments. He was looking primarily for jets, and he found them. He discovered advanced jet engine production. He found the startlingly advanced twin-engine Messerschmitt Me 262, the world’s first operational jet fighter. He came upon a swept-wing aircraft, evidence that the Germans were already exploring the realms of transonic and supersonic flight. He even found Germany’s leading builder of exotic aircraft, Willy Messerschmitt, living in a cow barn next to his house in Munich. Charles Lindbergh had an association with Pan Am that went back almost as far as Juan Trippe’s.

In a stormy shareholders meeting, the majority voted against Trippe. Trippe cleaned out his desk. It was the spring of 1927. He was out of a job, again. But he had reason to be optimistic. Things were happening in aviation. Whitney and Hambleton were ready to join him in a new venture called Aviation Corporation of America. They intended to bid on a proposed airmail route between Key West and Havana. Another young man, a lanky airmail pilot named Charles Lindbergh, had just proved the feasibility of transoceanic flight. And in Florida a new airline was being formed for the purpose of flying into Latin America. It was called Pan American Airways. Pan American was the dream child of Major Henry ”Hap” Arnold of the Army Air Corps. With his colleague Major Carl Spaatz, Arnold had raised an alarm in Washington about a German-operated airline in Central and South America called SCADTA (Sociedad Colombo Alemana de Transportes).

The liberals were wringing their hands over the notion of the elite and privileged flying in a billion-dollar airplane at the expense of America’s poor and disenfranchised. At the same time the President, John F. Kennedy, was taking heat from the bean counters in Washington, who wanted to spend America’s money on a host of new social programs as well as some expensive items of Cold War hardware. Trippe was even getting flak from America’s greatest hero. Of all people, Charles Lindbergh, Pan Am’s technical consultant, had gone public with his feelings about the SST. “It doesn’t make sense,” the Lone Eagle was telling anyone who would listen. Such an airplane had to be narrow and pencil-shaped to achieve supersonic speeds. You couldn’t make money with the minuscule passenger loads at such a high operating cost. But Lindbergh’s real concern wasn’t for engineering problems.


pages: 137 words: 43,960

Top 10 Maui, Molokai and Lanai by Bonnie Friedman

airport security, centre right, Charles Lindbergh, G4S, Maui Hawaii, polynesian navigation, Ronald Reagan

One of the Seven Pools Falls at Makahiku These magnificent 181ft falls are accessible from the Waimoku Falls Trail (half a mile up from ‘Ohe‘o Gulch ranger station). A beautiful pool at the top of the falls is great for a cooling dip. Waimoku Falls Haleakal… National Park ª TR A KAUP Ka up≥ Gap Hoku‘ula Ki Va p a h lle ul y u 4 2 0 31 Kipahulu 56 Mokulau 98 Puka‘auhuhu Kaup≥ 7 K…ki‘o Pu‘uiki Koali Charles Lindbergh’s Grave First to fly solo across the Atlantic, Charles Lindbergh (1902– 74), lived out his days amid the peaceful beauty of the H…na coast. He sketched the design for his grave, which lies behind the Palapala Ho‘omau Church in K≤pahulu. Maui’s Top 10 Farther up the trail, beyond a fantastic bamboo forest, Waimoku Falls spills 450 ft over the ledge of a high cliff, tumbling into a shallow pool. You can swim or wade in the refreshing water here, a welcome treat on a hot day.

Top 10 Sights Kaup≥ coast If you plan to drive around Maui’s “backside,” make sure you have food, water, and plenty of gas when you leave H…na. The next populated area is ‘Ulupalakua in Upcountry Maui. As tempting as it may be, do not take any stones or other natural objects from Haleakal… National Park as souvenirs. • Map K5–J6 • K≤pahulu Ranger Station & Visitor Center: 248 7375 • Maui Visitors Bureau: 244 3530 24 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 ‘Ohe‘o Gulch Seven Pools Falls at Makahiku Waimoku Falls Charles Lindbergh’s Grave K≤pahulu Point Lighthouse County Park Hui Aloha Church, Kaup≥ Kaup≥ Store St. Joseph’s Church Kaup≥ Gap Waimoku Falls ‘Ohe‘o Gulch The K≤pahulu Valley, formed by the flowing waters of ‘Ohe‘o Gulch, drops steeply from the east rim of Haleakal… to the ocean. A rain forest wilderness, its fragile environment is mostly protected as a preserve and closed to the public. But the lower part of the valley can be visited on foot along the Waimoku Falls Trail.

Left Huialoha Church Right Cattle ranch Sights Wailua 6 7 8 9 Han… Cultural Center 0 Pi‘ilanihale Heiau Honoman« Bay Ke‘anae Peninsula Ke‘anae Garden of Eden Arboretum 2 3 Wailua Wailua Bay lle Wai’anapanapa State Park y ae ‘ an 4 H…na Hale ho H…moa ‘i Vall ey K…ki‘o M«‘olea lc h Gu Wailua 8 Waimoku Falls Palapala Ho‘omau Church Kipahulu 9 Kaup≥ Mamalu Bay 5 ai ‘o he p≥ Gap 31 H…na Cultural Center Kau‘iki Hill ‘O Kau A ª TR IL Nu‘u Kip a Va h ul lle u y KA U P a k a l… V a lley 6 7 W Haleakal… National Park Huakini Bay 92 Pi‘ilanihale Heiau Wai‘…napanapa State Park 5 K uhi Waimoku Falls Huialoha Church 360 wa Kau’iki Hill Palapala Ho‘omau Church (Charles Lindbergh’s grave) N…hiku H¡N A H IGH W AY Pua‘aka‘a State Wayside Park Va y 3 4 5 Kailua lle Garden of Eden Arboretum To Kahului Va The Road to H…na Ke 1 2 0 Mokulau Huialoha Church miles 0 km Previous pages Pu‘u ‘Ula‘ula summit, Haleakal… 5 The Road to H…na Famed as one of the world’s most scenic drives, H…na Highway follows the coastline from Kahului, winding through rain forests dotted with the bright orange blossoms of African tulip trees and huge bamboo thickets waving in the breeze.


Discover Maui by Lonely Planet

California gold rush, carbon footprint, Charles Lindbergh, land reform, Maui Hawaii, sustainable-tourism, trade route

ʻOheʻo Gulch PHOTOGRAPHER: KARL LEHMANN/LONELY PLANET IMAGES © Kipahulu Less than a mile south of ʻOheʻo Gulch lies the little village of Kipahulu. It’s hard to imagine, but this sedate community was once a bustling sugar-plantation town. After the mill shut down in 1922, most people left for jobs elsewhere. Today mixed among modest homes, organic farms and back-to-the-landers living off the grid are a scattering of exclusive estates, including the former home of famed aviator Charles Lindbergh. Sights & Activities CHARLES LINDBERGH’S GRAVE Gravesite Charles Lindbergh moved to remote Kipahulu in 1968. Although he relished the privacy he found here, he did occasionally emerge as a spokesperson for conservation issues. When he learned he had terminal cancer, he decided to forgo treatment on the mainland and came home to Maui to live out his final days. Following his death in 1974, Lindbergh was buried in the graveyard of Palapala Hoʻomau Congregational Church.

Then keep moving – there’s still lots to see! Wailua Falls ( Click here ) This roadside cascade is a top contender for Maui’s most gorgeous waterfall. Haleakalā National Park ( Click here ) (Kipahulu area) The road continues to ʻOheʻo Gulch with its 24 pools, each backed by its own little waterfall. Make time to hike to the 200ft plunge of Makahiku Falls . Kipahulu ( Click here ) Seek out the grave of aviator Charles Lindbergh before heading off on the Piʻilani Hwy for a romp through cowboy country. Molokini Crater (Click here ) On day six, dive into the pristine waters of this sunken crater that harbors brilliant fish and coral. Maui Ocean Center ( Click here ) Right where the Molokini boat docks sits one of the finest tropical aquariums on the planet. Go and identify all those colorful fish you’ve just seen.

The awesome road to Hana is so special we’ve dedicated an entire chapter to it (see Click here). This chapter starts with time-honored Hana, where you’ll relearn the meaning of s-l-o-w and talk story with people who actually take the time. Beyond Hana lies Wailua Falls, the most stunning roadside waterfall on the entire island, and the cool forested trails of ʻOheʻo Gulch. In sleepy Kipahulu, discover the gravesite of famed aviator Charles Lindbergh and savor organic snacks at off-the-grid farms. A fitting finale to it all is the adventurous romp along the Piʻilani Hwy and through the cowboy village of Kaupo. Wailua Falls (Click here) PHOTOGRAPHER: DOUGLAS PEEBLES/PHOTOLIBRARY Top of chapter Hana & East Maui Itineraries One Day Hana Town Center (Click here ) If you’ve got one day it’s all about slowing down to experience Hana’s aloha.


Shoot for the Moon: The Space Race and the Extraordinary Voyage of Apollo 11 by James Donovan

Charles Lindbergh, Hans Lippershey, Kickstarter, low earth orbit, Monroe Doctrine, mutually assured destruction, Norman Mailer, operation paperclip, orbital mechanics / astrodynamics, white flight

In May 1959, the astronauts visited the McDonnell plant in San Diego to inspect a mock-up Mercury capsule that was radically different from any craft they had ever flown. Deke Slayton stated the obvious: “The thing ain’t got no wings!” They were surprised to find that there was no front window, just two small portholes that were too far away from the astronaut to be useful. Pilots needed a front window—at least, they had since Charles Lindbergh crossed the Atlantic without one and had to use a periscope to see around his extra-large fuel tank—and after they insisted, one was added, though it wouldn’t be available for the first mission. Another problem was the door—there wasn’t one, or not one that could be opened from the inside, since the hatch would be welded shut after the astronaut wedged himself into the capsule. That was fine for the structural integrity of the spacecraft but not for the man inside, especially if he wanted to egress quickly.

He made the case that experimental test pilots were necessary in spaceflight, since the likelihood of a failure or an emergency would require their experience, knowledge, and quick reactions. The audience gave him a standing ovation. But the apes made everything worse. Other test pilots sneered at the primates preceding the astronauts in the capsule. If a monkey could do it, they opined, it couldn’t be much of a challenge. Did Charles Lindbergh have a monkey fly the Spirit of St. Louis first? The Mercury Seven were used to flying experimental planes before the kinks had been worked out. The increased hazards involved in a space venture made no difference to them—in their minds, they believed they had risked far greater dangers, not only during test flights but also in wartime combat missions. They understood that the simian experiments were necessary, but they didn’t like it.

Parades and appearances, a White House reception, and an address to a joint session of Congress followed. On a cold March morning in New York, four million people turned out on what was officially declared John Glenn Day for a parade for all the astronauts—though it was Glenn they were really there for. The ticker tape and shredded paper fell thick as snow, and the New York sanitation department later measured the paper garbage at thirty-five hundred tons—more than Charles Lindbergh had received after his 1927 flight from New York to Paris. Glenn was the third American in space, but his fame had quickly eclipsed that of his predecessors. There would be longer Mercury flights and more complicated and more challenging ones. But Glenn would be the gold standard for astronauts. Americans and countless others around the globe responded to something in him—an earnestness, a likability, a goodness.


pages: 726 words: 210,048

Hard Landing by Thomas Petzinger, Thomas Petzinger Jr.

airline deregulation, buy and hold, centralized clearinghouse, Charles Lindbergh, collective bargaining, cross-subsidies, desegregation, Donald Trump, feminist movement, index card, low cost airline, low cost carrier, low skilled workers, Marshall McLuhan, means of production, mutually assured destruction, Network effects, offshore financial centre, oil shock, Ponzi scheme, postindustrial economy, price stability, profit motive, Ralph Nader, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, strikebreaker, the medium is the message, The Predators' Ball, Thomas L Friedman, union organizing, yield management, zero-sum game

Title. HE9803.A4P48 1995 387.7′0973—dc20 95-13684 eISBN: 978-0-307-77449-1 v3.1 To Paulette And to Beatrice, Eva, and Janis It was a love of the air and sky and flying, the lure of adventure, the appreciation of beauty. It lay beyond the descriptive words of men—where immortality is touched through danger, where life meets death on an equal plane; where man is more than man. —CHARLES LINDBERGH, The Spirit of St. Louis, 1953 This is a nasty, rotten business. —ROBERT CRANDALL, American Airlines, 1994 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I grew up around the airlines. As a teenager I handled baggage and freight for United Airlines. My late grandmother, Beatrice V. March, founded a travel agency in Ohio 40 years ago. My father, Thomas V. Petzinger, Sr., built it into a business well known for integrity and innovation.

Boeing, bidding low because he built his own airplanes, won the line from Chicago to San Francisco, giving birth to what would become United Airlines. Florida Airways, created by World War I flying ace Eddie Rickenbacker, picked up the Atlanta-Miami run; it later became part of Eastern Air Lines. It was also thanks to Trippe’s action that a company called Robertson Aviation received the St. Louis-Chicago airmail route, on which Charles Lindbergh served as chief pilot. For Trippe himself, the airmail plan was fraught with unhappy irony. Though his company, Colonial Aviation, won the prized route between New York and Boston, Trippe wanted more: to bid for the route between New York and Chicago. But the cautious financiers on his board of directors feared overextension. Trippe narrowly lost a proxy fight and was thrown out of his own company.

So at 9:13 A.M. one morning in 1933 federal agents wearing synchronized watches stormed 100 airline offices around the country and carted away boxes of evidence. Roosevelt with great fanfare fired the private airlines and restored the mail routes to the army. Roosevelt’s move to embarrass the Republicans quickly turned into a bloody spectacle, for the military pilots no longer had the equipment or training to carry out the job. Within weeks 12 army fliers perished, five in the first week alone. The demure Charles Lindbergh took time from his trailblazing on behalf of Pan Am to harangue Roosevelt publicly, setting the nation’s two most beloved public figures against one another in a conflict that would last their lifetimes. An editorial cartoon showed FDR hiding from a dozen skeletons wearing goggles and flying caps. Stricken by the first political crisis of his presidency, Roosevelt soon relented, restoring the airmail to private contractors.


pages: 1,335 words: 336,772

The House of Morgan: An American Banking Dynasty and the Rise of Modern Finance by Ron Chernow

always be closing, bank run, banking crisis, Big bang: deregulation of the City of London, Bolshevik threat, Boycotts of Israel, Bretton Woods, British Empire, buy and hold, California gold rush, capital controls, Charles Lindbergh, collective bargaining, corporate raider, Etonian, financial deregulation, fixed income, German hyperinflation, index arbitrage, interest rate swap, margin call, money market fund, Monroe Doctrine, North Sea oil, oil shale / tar sands, old-boy network, paper trading, plutocrats, Plutocrats, Robert Gordon, Ronald Reagan, short selling, strikebreaker, the market place, the payments system, too big to fail, transcontinental railway, undersea cable, Yom Kippur War, young professional

For six months, I lunched with two affable bank representatives as they and their associates debated whether to cooperate with my project. Then one day, I made a startling discovery: the papers of Thomas W. Lamont, senior partner of the Morgan bank during the inter-war years, resided at the Harvard Business School Library. During my first day of research there, I pored over correspondence between Lamont and Franklin Roosevelt, Benito Mussolini, Charles Lindbergh, and Nancy Astor. These papers threw open a window on the hermetically sealed world of Morgan partners. Aside from the grace and clarity of these letters—old-school bankers tended to be surprisingly literate—they were detailed and gripping beyond my wildest imaginings. When Lamont spoke on the telephone with President Herbert Hoover, for instance, a dutiful amanuensis took down a verbatim transcript.

It fanned anti-Morgan sentiment that had existed in the hinterlands ever since William Jennings Bryan’s Cross of Gold speech. During rallies at the Corner, agitators would point to 23 Wall and blame Morgan partners for killing thousands of innocents. Senator Robert La Follette echoed small-town sneers when he asked, “What do Morgan and Schwab [head of Bethlehem Steel] care for world peace, when there are big profits in world war?”21Minnesota congressman Charles Lindbergh, who had prompted the Pujo hearings, now condemned the “money interests” for trying to lure the country into war on the side of the Allies. A dual myth was being born—that the Morgans were stooges of the British crown and that their money was drenched in blood. The bank received a flood of hate mail. Lamont received one note that said, “My dear Mr. Lamont—Your death doom is marked by your activity for the British war loan, which will deal death to my brothers on the battlefield in Germany.

The Morrow board drew up plans for army and navy use of airplanes. In 1925, Daniel and Harry Guggenheim—old friends of Dwight’s from his Kennecott Copper days—set up a special $3-million fund to advance aviation. Through Morrow, they got Coolidge to accept the money on behalf of the government to speed up airplane development. Through his stint on the Aviation Board, Dwight Morrow became friends with the young Charles Lindbergh. In fact, Morrow’s files show that the Morgan partners ended up paying for Lindbergh’s historic flight to Paris aboard The Spirit of St. Louis. Under the original scheme, Lindbergh had planned to compete for the $25,000 Orteig Prize, set up to reward the first nonstop flight between New York and Paris. The trip was thus supposed to be self-financing. Lindbergh contributed $2,000, and a number of other Saint Louis sponsors added $1,000 or $500 apiece.


pages: 283 words: 87,166

Reaching for Utopia: Making Sense of an Age of Upheaval by Jason Cowley

anti-communist, Berlin Wall, Bernie Sanders, Big bang: deregulation of the City of London, Boris Johnson, centre right, Charles Lindbergh, coherent worldview, Corn Laws, corporate governance, crony capitalism, David Brooks, deindustrialization, deskilling, Donald Trump, Etonian, eurozone crisis, Fall of the Berlin Wall, illegal immigration, liberal world order, Neil Kinnock, Occupy movement, offshore financial centre, old-boy network, open borders, plutocrats, Plutocrats, Right to Buy, Robert Mercer, Ronald Reagan, University of East Anglia

Roth is adept at simultaneously asserting the veracity of the stories he tells while seeking to undermine them by drawing attention to their artificiality. Roth’s strategy is one of complete disclosure interwoven with complete disavowal. Roth has said that there is at least one significant difference between Charles Lindbergh and Trump, whom he mocked as ‘the boastful buffoon’. ‘It’s the difference in stature between a President Lindbergh and a President Trump. Charles Lindbergh, in life as in my novel, may have been a genuine racist and an anti-Semite and a white supremacist sympathetic to fascism, but he was also – because of the extraordinary feat of his solo transatlantic flight at the age of twenty-five – an authentic American hero thirteen years before I have him winning the presidency.

Only in retrospect could it be said that history has a direction and meaning. The present as it is lived never feels like that; it is discontinuous, contingent. In truth, most of us live with a sense, even if only subconsciously, of the terror of the unforeseen, the event over which we have no control but which ineradicably alters the direction of our lives. In The Plot Against America, the unforeseen is the election of Charles Lindbergh as president after he defeats Roosevelt. In 1927 Lindbergh, a former airmail pilot, became at the age of twenty-five the first person to fly non-stop across the Atlantic, in his single-engine monoplane, the Spirit of St. Louis. He flew from New York to Paris without a radio or navigation aids, and his flight took him nearly thirty-four hours. In many ways, he did more than cross the Atlantic on that historic flight: he flew straight into the future and became, as J.

On his return to the US in 1939, Lindbergh, a determined Republican isolationist, campaigned against American intervention in what was after all, he said, a European war. At an America First Committee rally in Des Moines in 1941 (Roth moves the speech to 1940), he spoke of American Jews as ‘other peoples’, and warned Americans not to allow the ‘natural passions and prejudices’ of Jews to lead ‘our country to destruction’. You will learn very little about the true history of Charles Lindbergh from Roth’s novel. To Roth, he is less a historical figure – the ‘last naive hero’, as Ballard calls him – than a convenient device, a figure through which Roth can invert the founding ideal of the United States, transforming this proud vessel of migrations and new beginnings into a dystopia, the worst possible world for Jews. And Lindbergh is never more than an absent presence in the novel, someone heard on the radio or discussed in anxious conversation among senior family members.


pages: 393 words: 115,217

Loonshots: How to Nurture the Crazy Ideas That Win Wars, Cure Diseases, and Transform Industries by Safi Bahcall

accounting loophole / creative accounting, Albert Einstein, Apple II, Apple's 1984 Super Bowl advert, Astronomia nova, British Empire, Cass Sunstein, Charles Lindbergh, Clayton Christensen, cognitive bias, creative destruction, disruptive innovation, diversified portfolio, double helix, Douglas Engelbart, Douglas Engelbart, Edmond Halley, Gary Taubes, hypertext link, invisible hand, Isaac Newton, Johannes Kepler, Jony Ive, knowledge economy, lone genius, Louis Pasteur, Mark Zuckerberg, Menlo Park, Mother of all demos, Murray Gell-Mann, PageRank, Peter Thiel, Philip Mirowski, Pierre-Simon Laplace, prediction markets, pre–internet, Ralph Waldo Emerson, RAND corporation, random walk, Richard Feynman, Richard Thaler, side project, Silicon Valley, six sigma, Solar eclipse in 1919, stem cell, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, the scientific method, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, The Wisdom of Crowds, Tim Cook: Apple, tulip mania, Wall-E, wikimedia commons, yield management

Trippe’s brochure advertised wide wicker chairs and sliding glass windows and asked, “How many times have you stood on the deck of a steamer, tossing in a rough sea?… How you longed for the smooth, quick flight of the gulls.” Business grew, but slowly. Trippe needed some way to fire up the public about flying. Which is when Trippe got the luckiest break of his career. He met and recruited Lucky Lindy. At 7:51 a.m. on May 20, 1927, at Roosevelt Field, Long Island, Charles Lindbergh, age 25, eased back the stick on his single-engine plane, revving the engine, sending the heavily loaded plane wobbling down the runway. His plane, the Spirit of St. Louis, had never flown with this much weight. By the abort point on the runway, just past the halfway mark, the plane had not yet reached flying speed, but Lindbergh felt “the load shifting from wheels to wings.” He cleared the telephone wires at the edge of the field by twenty feet.

At Trippe’s request, Lindbergh lobbied on behalf of Pan Am for its Latin America routes. Imagine you are a career Post Office bureaucrat, and the most worshipped young man on the planet walks into your drab, ten-by-ten-foot office. Pan Am won every US postal contract to the region. Three round-trip mail runs to Buenos Aires alone paid for one Sikorsky S-38 flying boat. Without the airmail contracts, Trippe’s competitors—other startup airlines eyeing the same routes—folded. Charles Lindbergh and Juan Trippe plan Pan Am’s conquest of Latin America (1929) Trippe now had the routes and the planes. There was just one problem: navigation. Trippe’s pilots, like Lindbergh, flew by dead reckoning—compass, map, and eyeballs. Although the flight across the Straits of Florida was much shorter than Lindbergh’s transatlantic flight, it was still dangerous. The islands and Florida Keys were much smaller targets than the shoreline of Europe, and the commercial planes had much shorter range than Lindbergh’s single-engine, stripped-down plane.

It announced that rockets did not in fact violate the laws of physics and that “the Times regrets the error.”) Scientists in Germany, however, had taken Goddard’s ideas seriously. They began their program after reading his papers. Years later, a German officer being grilled by American officers about their V-2 rocket program exclaimed, “Why don’t you ask your own Dr. Goddard?” In the US, one well-known aviation expert had also taken the idea of rocket propulsion seriously. Charles Lindbergh had encouraged Goddard and introduced him to the donors who funded his research. Lindbergh was a full colonel in the Air Force. But he was unable to interest the military in Goddard’s rockets. Much of that was due to an unprecedented campaign of personal attacks against Lindbergh by President Roosevelt. A conflict between the two public giants had been brewing for years before the war. The conflict began when Roosevelt canceled postal service airmail delivery contracts in favor of having the Army Air Corps deliver the mail.


Chasing the Moon: The People, the Politics, and the Promise That Launched America Into the Space Age by Robert Stone, Alan Andres

affirmative action, Albert Einstein, anti-communist, Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic, Charles Lindbergh, cuban missile crisis, desegregation, feminist movement, invention of the telephone, low earth orbit, more computing power than Apollo, New Journalism, Norman Mailer, operation paperclip, out of africa, RAND corporation, Ronald Reagan, the scientific method, traveling salesman, Works Progress Administration

Far more welcoming was the small community of science-fiction magazine editors and publishers, and out of necessity Ley began to support himself through his writing. By the time Ley had arrived in the United States, Robert Goddard had become increasingly reclusive, having moved all his research to a secluded desert testing facility in Roswell, New Mexico. Noted aviation philanthropist Harry Guggenheim had stepped in to provide funding for his rocket research, thanks to the intercession of famed airman Charles Lindbergh as well as one of Goddard’s former students at Clark University, an aviation pioneer named Edwin Aldrin. (Aldrin was to become famous a little more than three decades later as the father of astronaut Buzz Aldrin, one of the first two men to land on the Moon.) Goddard’s continued secrecy aroused the suspicions of Ley, who considered the professor’s reputation in America overrated and unequal to the stature of Oberth.

Coming from a fraternity of combat fliers and jet jockeys, the Mercury Seven, as they came to be called, had no intention of being treated like confined lab rats in a glorified orbiting science experiment. They saw themselves first and foremost as active pilots. However, neither they nor NASA were prepared for how their fairly routine press conference would become a pivotal moment in the marketing of the American space program and the transformation of modern celebrity. Preceded by stories of past air heroes like Charles Lindbergh and a decade of Hollywood science-fiction films, the seven pilots were thrust into starring roles in the television age’s first heroic real-life narrative. They and their families were abruptly placed under the modern media’s spotlight. Ghostwritten and sanitized versions of their lives appeared in heavily promoted issues of Life magazine, the result of a controversial NASA-approved contract that gave the magazine exclusive rights to the personal stories of the astronauts and their wives, even though the men were government employees.

A somewhat blurry transmission from Moscow presented a carefully orchestrated display in which Gagarin stepped from an airplane and strode across a red carpet toward a jubilant and beaming Soviet premier Nikita Khrushchev. The two men were then seen proceeding in a motorcade to a massive celebration in Red Square. The face of Russian cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin as reproduced on newspaper front pages around the world when he became the first human to travel into space on April 12, 1961. It was likely this photograph that caused Arthur C. Clarke to compare him to a modern-day Charles Lindbergh. In Washington, however, journalists were even more concerned with another subject: Cuba. Following the revolution two years earlier that had overthrown dictator Fulgencio Batista, American relations with the government of Fidel Castro had deteriorated badly. The United States broke off all diplomatic ties with Cuba only days before Kennedy was inaugurated. In one of his first actions, the new president approved a CIA plan for an armed invasion of this island nation, which he was assured would be carried out in such a manner that American involvement would remain entirely hidden.


pages: 369 words: 121,161

Alistair Cooke's America by Alistair Cooke

Albert Einstein, Alistair Cooke, British Empire, Charles Lindbergh, double entry bookkeeping, full employment, Gunnar Myrdal, Hernando de Soto, imperial preference, interchangeable parts, joint-stock company, Maui Hawaii, Ralph Nader, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Spread Networks laid a new fibre optics cable between New York and Chicago, strikebreaker, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, transcontinental railway, Triangle Shirtwaist Factory, urban sprawl, wage slave, Works Progress Administration

Boys in confederate uniform. (Library of Congress) 13. General U. S. Grant and staff. (Library of Congress) 14. Abraham Lincoln. (The Meserve Collection, Courtesy of Philip B. Kunhardt, Jr) 15. Rockefeller et al. (Brown Bros) 16. Italian immigrant family, 1905. (George Eastman House) 17. Lynching, Indiana, 1930. (Lyon-Magnum) 18. Teddy Roosevelt. (Brown Bros) 19. Woodrow Wilson. (Library of Congress) 20. Charles Lindbergh with monoplane. (Brown Bros) 21. Franklin Roosevelt, 1939. (Wide World Photos) 22. The burning hulk of U.S.S. Arizona. (U.S. Navy) 23. D-Day landings. (U.S. Coast Guard) 24. John F. Kennedy in the Oval Office. (A. Rickerby / T. L. Picture Agency) 25. Two bored Marines, Vietnam. (David Douglas Dunn) 26. Hippies. (John Olson) 27. Blacks/National Guard, Mississippi, 1962. (P. Schutzer) 28.

As the second night came on in Paris, an appeal went out to everybody who owned an automobile – which might be from seventy to eighty thousand, maybe – to head for a landing field at Le Bourget and line up in two files, switch the headlights on and thus create a visible shaft of white fog. Into it, thirty-three hours after just missing the telephone wires on Long Island, the strange plane trundled and stopped. It was engulfed by one hundred thousand Parisians. When they lifted the pilot out of the cockpit, if he had said he was Alexander the Great, they’d have believed him. He reportedly said simply: ‘I am Charles Lindbergh.’ He came home to naval salutes and a frenetic press, and a ticker-tape parade up Broadway. The ticker-tape parade was to become New York’s special accolade for a few carefully chosen national gods. Down the decades the biggest blizzards have been reserved for such returning heroes as General Eisenhower, General MacArthur, astronaut John Glenn, and, three years after Lindbergh, a sunny, firm-jawed, handsome lawyer from Atlanta, Georgia.

It was an affront to the millions of Americans who did not share Roosevelt’s prejudice that, if Britain were conquered and her navy captured, America would be the Nazis’ next port of call. The country divided furiously and openly between those who were for intervention, or for the suspicious aim of ‘all aid short of war,’ and those America Firsters who quoted Jefferson’s warnings about ‘entangling alliances’ and urged isolation in what they called Fortress America. ‘We believe,’ said Charles Lindbergh, ‘that the security of our country lies in the strength and character of our own people, and not in fighting foreign wars.’ It had been almost exactly two years since the British people had heard over the radio the toneless voice of Neville Chamberlain, their Prime Minister, saying that Germany had been told to withdraw her troops from Poland; but ‘I have to tell you that no such understanding has been received and in consequence, this country is at war with Germany.’


pages: 135 words: 53,708

Top 10 San Diego by Pamela Barrus, Dk Publishing

California gold rush, centre right, Charles Lindbergh, East Village, El Camino Real, G4S, haute cuisine, illegal immigration, Silicon Valley, the market place, transcontinental railway, urban renewal

Alonzo Horton (1813–1909) The “Father” of San Diego successfully established the city’s present location in 1867. Wyatt Earp (1848–1929) The gunman (see p8) owned saloons and gambling halls in the Gaslamp Quarter. John D. Spreckels (1853–1926) A generous philanthropist, businessman (see p25), and owner of Hotel del Coronado. L. Frank Baum (1856–1919) Baum (see p24) lived in and considered Coronado an “earthly paradise.” Charles Lindbergh (1853–1926) The first to fly solo across the Atlantic in 1927 (see p25). Theodore Geisel (1904–91) Best known as Dr. Seuss, he lived and worked in La Jolla. The San Diego Chicken (b. 1953) The chicken-suited antics of Ted Giannoulas have brought international attention to San Diego sports and events. View from Balboa Park, 1916 Dr. Seuss was the author of the children’s classics The Cat in the Hat and Green Eggs and Ham. 39 San Diego’s Top 10 Left Victorian houses in Heritage Park Right Façade of Mission San Luis Rey de Francia Historic Sites Ballast Point In 1542, while Kumeyaay Indians waited on a beach at Ballast Point, Juan Cabrillo (see p27) stepped ashore and claimed the land for Spain.

Gaslamp Quarter Filled with late-19th century Victorian architecture, this premiere historic site was once the commercial heart of Alonzo Horton’s (see pp38–9) New Town. When development moved north to Broadway, the neighborhood succumbed to gambling halls and brothels. It was revitalized in the 1970s (see pp8–9). Lindbergh Field San Diego International Airport (see p85) is popularly called after Charles Lindbergh (see p39), who began the first leg of his trans-Atlantic crossing from here in 1927. The US Army Air Corps drained the surrounding marshland, took over the small airport, and enlarged the runways to accommodate the heavy bomber aircraft manufactured in San Diego during World War II. d Map C5 The Mexican-Californian ranchers were known as Californios. Border Field State Park Mission San Luis Rey de Francia 428-3034 • Open 9:30am–5pm daily San Diego’s Top 10 The Mexican-American Nicknamed the “King War concluded with the of Missions” for its signing of the Treaty of size, wealth, and vast Guadalupe Hidalgo (see agricultural estates, p38) on February 2, 1848. this mission is the largest A US and Mexican adobe structure in Boundary Commission Memorial plaque at California.

San Diego International Airport No matter where you are in San Diego, look up and you’ll see a jet soaring dramatically past the downtown high-rises on its final approach to Lindbergh Field (see p40) as locals call the airport. A 100 years ago, this area was a muddy wasteland that proved to be an ideal spot for budding inventors and pilots to try out their latest machines. In 1927, Ryan Aviation (see p39) designed, produced, and tested on the beach the Spirit of St. Louis, the historic plane that Charles Lindbergh piloted solo across the Atlantic. d Map C5 Around Town – Southern San Diego In the 1880s, two wealthy businessmen, Elisha Babcock, Jr. and Hampton Story, purchased Coronado and set out to build a town. They sold lots, laid streets, and constructed the landmark Hotel del Coronado (see p115). John D. Spreckels (see p39) soon bought them out and turned Coronado into a haven for oldmoney gentry.


pages: 265 words: 74,807

Our Robots, Ourselves: Robotics and the Myths of Autonomy by David A. Mindell

Air France Flight 447, autonomous vehicles, Captain Sullenberger Hudson, Charles Lindbergh, Chris Urmson, digital map, disruptive innovation, drone strike, en.wikipedia.org, Erik Brynjolfsson, fudge factor, index card, John Markoff, low earth orbit, Mars Rover, ride hailing / ride sharing, Ronald Reagan, self-driving car, Silicon Valley, telepresence, telerobotics, trade route, US Airways Flight 1549, William Langewiesche, zero-sum game

“The twentieth century was born yearning for a new type of hero,” writes aviation historian Robert Wohl, “someone able to master the cold, inhuman machines that the nineteenth century bequeathed and at the same type transforming them into resplendent art and myth.” From Charles Lindbergh to Neil Armstrong to “Sully” Sullenberger, the cultural icon of the pilot embodied the human on the cutting edge of technology and social change. Analogies flowed freely—the adventurer of the sky, the aerial artist, the athlete of the third dimension. World War I offered new identities, particularly the “knight of the air” flying fighter ace, reviving ancient mythologies to rescue heroism from an anonymous war of trenches and random death. Ironically, most pilots, including Wilbur Wright, Charles Lindbergh, and Neil Armstrong conformed to none of these archetypes so much as to that of the mechanic or engineer imbued with the middle-class virtues of temperance, deliberation, and focus.

Even today’s satellites are, of course, robotic vehicles employing a mix of automation and human control from the ground. In the late twentieth century, unmanned aircraft did find a niche as returnable target drones used as gunnery targets for training. These were either small, custom vehicles or manned aircraft with the pilots replaced by computers and guidance systems. The Ryan Firebee drone, for example (made by the same company that made Charles Lindbergh’s Spirit of St. Louis) could execute a preplanned route and return to a recovery point and land by parachute. Over four thousand Firebee drones flew prior to 1971, and the extensive experience spurred more operational uses. Firebee-derived vehicles saw combat in Vietnam, in a reconnaissance version known as Lightning Bug, launched from C-130 aircraft. Most were decoys or electronic jammers; some recorded data, especially on electronic emissions of antiaircraft radars.


pages: 302 words: 73,946

People Powered: How Communities Can Supercharge Your Business, Brand, and Teams by Jono Bacon

Airbnb, barriers to entry, blockchain, bounce rate, Cass Sunstein, Charles Lindbergh, Debian, Firefox, if you build it, they will come, IKEA effect, Internet Archive, Jono Bacon, Kickstarter, Kubernetes, lateral thinking, Mark Shuttleworth, Minecraft, minimum viable product, more computing power than Apollo, planetary scale, pull request, Richard Stallman, Richard Thaler, sexual politics, Silicon Valley, Travis Kalanick, Y Combinator

Foreword It always amazes me what we can achieve when we try to make the impossible possible. Shortly after finishing medical school at Harvard, I read about the twenty-five-thousand-dollar Orteig Prize in Charles Lindbergh’s autobiography, Spirit of St. Louis.1 The competition launched in 1919 and challenged intrepid aviators to fly an airplane nonstop between New York and Paris, a feat that at the time seemed nearly impossible. As history has continually taught us though, the human spirit has the courage to look adversity squarely in the eye. The prize was won in 1927 by Charles Lindbergh following his heroic 33.5-hour flight, and it significantly advanced aviation technology. I was enormously inspired by this story and the power of incentive prizes—so much so that I launched the first XPRIZE in 1996.

That has been my hope for this book. I can’t wait to see what you all come up with! Best of luck. Let me know how you get on, and let me know if there is anything I can ever help with. I want you all to succeed and thrive, no matter what you are working on. Rock on! Notes ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 1. “Become a Member,” Jono Bacon, accessed January 9, 2019, https://www.jonobacon.com/join/. FOREWORD 1. Charles Lindbergh, Spirit of St. Louis (New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1953), 25, 34, 77, 102. 2. Michelle Evans, “5 Stats You Need to Know About Connected Consumers,” Forbes, August 22, 2017, https://www.forbes.com/sites/michelleevans1/2017/08/22/5-stats-you-need-to-know-about-connected-consumers-in-2017/#7909aeec1962; Peter Diamandis, “4 Billion New Minds Online: The Coming Era of Connectivity,” Singularity, July 27, 2018, https://singularityhub.com/2018/07/27/4-billion-new-minds-online-the-coming-era-of-connectivity/#sm.000qnxowz119ye48z0y104iujpn9p. 3.


pages: 362 words: 95,782

Stephen Fry in America by Stephen Fry

Bretton Woods, Buckminster Fuller, call centre, Charles Lindbergh, Columbine, Donald Trump, illegal immigration, intermodal, jimmy wales, Jony Ive, Kickstarter, Mark Zuckerberg, Menlo Park, Richard Feynman, Ronald Reagan, Rosa Parks, Saturday Night Live, Silicon Valley, Steve Jobs, Upton Sinclair, urban sprawl, Yogi Berra

* * * MISSOURI KEY FACTS Abbreviation: MO Nickname: The Show Me State Capital: Jefferson City Flower: Hawthorne Tree: Flowering dogwood Bird: Bluebird Nut: East black walnut Motto: Salus populi suprema lex esto (‘The well being of the people should be the supreme law’) Well-known residents and natives: Harry S. Truman (33rd President), Sen. Bill Bradley, John Ashcroft, General John Pershing, General Omar Bradley, Mark Twain, Laura Ingalls Wilders, T.S. Eliot, Marianne Moore, William Burroughs, Langston Hughes, Tennessee Williams, Maya Angelou, Frank and Jesse James, Calamity Jane, Dale Carnegie, Max Factor, Charles Lindbergh, Edwin Hubble, Joseph Pulitzer, Adolphus ‘Budweiser’ Busch, James ‘McDonnell Douglas’ McDonnell, Bill ‘Jet’ Lear, J.C. Penney, Kenneth ‘Enron’ Lay, Walter Cronkite, Rush Limbaugh, Bob Barker, Yogi Berra, Payne Stewart, Scott Joplin, Charlie Parker, Basil Poledouris, Chuck Berry, Grace Bumbry, Burt Bacharach, Sheryl Crow, Eminem, Josephine Baker, Wallace Beery, Robert Cummings, Jean Harlow, Walt Disney, Betty Grable.

* * * MICHIGAN KEY FACTS Abbreviation: MI Nickname: The Wolverine State, the Great Lakes State, the Automotive State, Water-Winter Wonderland, the Mitten State Capital: Lansing Flower: Apple Blossom Tree: White Pine Bird: American Robin Reptile: Painted turtle Motto: Si quaeris peninsulam amoenam circumspice (‘If it’s a pleasant peninsula you’re after, then look around you’) Well-known residents and natives: Pontiac (American Indian leader), Thomas Dewey, Charles Lindbergh, Betty Ford, Elijah ‘the real’ McCoy, Jimmy Hoffa, Aileen Wuornos, Ivan Boesky, Edna Ferber, Elmore Leonard, Joyce Carol Oates, Neil LaBute, Ring Lardner, Richard Ellmann, Theodore Roethke, Jim Bakker, Malcolm X, James (Barnum and Bailey) Bailey, W. K. Kellogg, C.W. ‘Grape Nuts’ Post, Henry Ford, Horace and John Dodge, David Buick, John De Lorean, William Boeing, Larry ‘Google’ Page, William ‘Packard’ Hewlett, Steve ‘Microsoft’ Ballmer, Edgar Bergen, Sandra Bernhard, Casey Kasem, James ‘Inside The Actors’ Studio’ Lipton, Jerry Bruckheimer, Francis Ford Coppola, John Hughes, Michael Moore, Sam Raimi, Paul Schrader, George C.

* * * MINNESOTA KEY FACTS Abbreviation: MN Nickname: North Star State, Land of 10,000 Lakes, The Gopher State Capital: St Paul Flower: Pink and White Lady Slipper Tree: Red Pine State muffin: Blueberry Bird: Common Loon Motto: L’Etoile Du Nord (‘The Star of the North’) Well-known residents and natives: Hubert Humphrey, Eugene McCarthy, Walter Mondale, Frank Kellogg, Charles ‘Clinic’ Mayo, John S. ‘Doughboy’ Pillsbury, Charles Lindbergh, Kofi Annan, J. Paul Getty, Billy Graham, Robert Mondavi, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Sinclair Lewis, Robert ‘Zen’ Pirsig, Robert Bly, Anne Tyler, August Wilson, Charles ‘Peanuts’ Schulz, Garrison Keillor, Terry Gilliam, Mike Todd, William Demarest, Gig Young, Jane Russell, Tippi Hedren, Richard Widmark, E.G. Marshall, James ‘Gunsmoke’ Arness, Gale Sondergaard, George Roy Hill, Peter ‘Mission Impossible’ Graves, Mike ‘BJ in MASH’ Farrell, Jessica Lange, the Coen Brothers, Winona Ryder, Josh Hartnett, Vince Vaughn, The Andrews Sisters, Tiny Tim, Bob Dylan, Prince


pages: 340 words: 91,745

Duped: Double Lives, False Identities, and the Con Man I Almost Married by Abby Ellin

Bernie Madoff, bitcoin, Burning Man, business intelligence, Charles Lindbergh, cognitive dissonance, Donald Trump, double helix, dumpster diving, East Village, feminist movement, forensic accounting, fudge factor, hiring and firing, Internet Archive, longitudinal study, Lyft, mandatory minimum, meta analysis, meta-analysis, pink-collar, Ponzi scheme, Robert Hanssen: Double agent, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, Skype, Snapchat, telemarketer, theory of mind, Thomas Kuhn: the structure of scientific revolutions

By way of explanation, Lyman says this: “A man can be faithful to himself or to other people, but not to both, at least not happily.”10 The Broadway darling Dear Evan Hansen focused on a morose teenager who pretends to be a close friend of a classmate who committed suicide, fooling his family. The audience was supposed to sympathize with the con man. Of course, there have also been real-world figures leading closeted lives, historical counterparts to our Bernie Madoffs: Thomas Jefferson (who fathered six children with his slave Sally Hemings). Charles Lindbergh (who had three separate families on two continents). J. Edgar Hoover (a racist, cross-dressing, anti-gay gay man). Lance Armstrong. Harvey Weinstein. Pop culture is littered with deceit: Hitchcock’s films are all about deception, from Suspicion to Vertigo to Rear Window. More recently there was The Departed, a fictionalized account of Boston mob boss Whitey Bulger and his Winter Hill Gang.

Some people do manage to pull off a Liminal Life without leaving home. New Yorker editor William Shawn had a second family with the writer Lillian Ross. They, along with her adopted son, dined together every night before Shawn returned to his other family.29 That was public knowledge, at least in certain spheres. François Mitterrand’s two families grieved shoulder to shoulder at his funeral. Vive la France! Decidedly less open was the flying hero Charles Lindbergh, who had three families in Germany, a wife in the States, and a gaggle of offspring scattered on the two continents. He was married to Anne Morrow Lindbergh (they had six kids, one of whom, Charles Junior, the “Lindbergh Baby,” was snatched from his crib in 1932 and murdered), but he had a seventeen-year relationship with Brigitte Hesshaimer, a thirty-one-year-old German hatmaker whom he met through his private secretary, Valeska, with whom he was also involved.

Despite the fact that her parents had five more children, they led separate lives, and her father, she speculated, propelled himself into the arms of other women because of his inner tumult. (Some speculate that Anne Morrow Lindbergh had her share of lovers, too.) Lindbergh’s Pulitzer Prize–winning biographer, A. Scott Berg, was equally mystified by his subject’s double (triple? quadruple?) lives, which came to light in 2003, not long after Anne Morrow Lindbergh died. Charles Lindbergh, who hated people with disabilities, who was a devoted husband and father? None of this made sense. “He was the most celebrated living person to walk the earth, the first modern media superstar,” said Berg. “And yet there wasn’t a single clue.”31 MOST OF US don’t lead double lives to that extent, and so we can tell ourselves we’re completely different from the Lindberghs of the world. But we all present many different “I’s.”


pages: 603 words: 186,210

Appetite for America: Fred Harvey and the Business of Civilizing the Wild West--One Meal at a Time by Stephen Fried

Albert Einstein, British Empire, business intelligence, centralized clearinghouse, Charles Lindbergh, City Beautiful movement, estate planning, glass ceiling, In Cold Blood by Truman Capote, indoor plumbing, Livingstone, I presume, Nelson Mandela, new economy, plutocrats, Plutocrats, refrigerator car, transcontinental railway, traveling salesman, women in the workforce, Works Progress Administration, young professional

Because of Fred and Ford Harvey, this innovative family business played a crucial role in American culture from the post–Civil War era all the way through World War II. Fred Harvey ran all the restaurants and hotels along the country’s largest railroad, the Santa Fe between Chicago and Los Angeles; went on to serve the nation’s cross-country drivers on Route 66, the first superhighway; and even played a vital role in the formative, thrilling, and scary years of the airline business—because Fred’s grandson Freddy was an original partner in TWA with Charles Lindbergh and Henry Ford. Fred Harvey’s “eating houses” were prototypes of the disparate dining experiences that characterize American eating: They had formal, sit-down dining rooms (in which even cowboys were expected to wear jackets), attached to large casual dining areas with long curved counters (the genesis of the classic American diner), attached to take-out coffee and sandwich stands (the original Starbucks).

A pair of flyers was poised to try the flight from France: socialite Captain Charles Nungesser, a highly decorated World War I flyer whose many broken bones were rumored to have been replaced with platinum, along with his one-eyed navigator, Lieutenant François Coli. There were three other American pilots jockeying for the prize. Two were similarly well-financed war heroes; the third was a bold young mail-plane pilot from St. Louis named Charles Lindbergh. Freddy knew Lindbergh from the air corps—the young flyer had attended a two-week reserve officers camp in Kansas City in 1925, where he impressed Harvey and his fellow aviators by flying brilliantly and single-mindedly, refusing to drink, smoke, or even joke around with the others. Freddy had also known Lindbergh’s backers for years—they were the wealthy members of the flying club in St.

Lindbergh, undeterred, waited only for the weather to clear, and at 7:52 on Friday morning, May 20, 1927, he took off. With nothing for company but four sandwiches and two canteens of water, he flew thirty-five hundred miles, without stopping, in just under thirty-four hours. When he touched down at Le Bourget field in Paris, more than a hundred thousand cheering people were waiting there to greet him. Charles Lindbergh became the biggest overnight celebrity the world had ever known. His fame literally redefined fame. Time magazine invented its “Man of the Year” cover feature just to honor him. To capitalize on that fame—and use it to further the cause of aviation—Lindbergh and his plane were immediately sent on a propeller-stop tour of every state in the Union, underwritten by Harry Guggenheim, the thirty-seven-year-old heir to the family mining and smelting fortune.


pages: 368 words: 96,825

Bold: How to Go Big, Create Wealth and Impact the World by Peter H. Diamandis, Steven Kotler

3D printing, additive manufacturing, Airbnb, Amazon Mechanical Turk, Amazon Web Services, augmented reality, autonomous vehicles, Charles Lindbergh, cloud computing, creative destruction, crowdsourcing, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, dematerialisation, deskilling, disruptive innovation, Elon Musk, en.wikipedia.org, Exxon Valdez, fear of failure, Firefox, Galaxy Zoo, Google Glasses, Google Hangouts, gravity well, ImageNet competition, industrial robot, Internet of things, Jeff Bezos, John Harrison: Longitude, John Markoff, Jono Bacon, Just-in-time delivery, Kickstarter, Kodak vs Instagram, Law of Accelerating Returns, Lean Startup, life extension, loss aversion, Louis Pasteur, low earth orbit, Mahatma Gandhi, Marc Andreessen, Mark Zuckerberg, Mars Rover, meta analysis, meta-analysis, microbiome, minimum viable product, move fast and break things, Narrative Science, Netflix Prize, Network effects, Oculus Rift, optical character recognition, packet switching, PageRank, pattern recognition, performance metric, Peter H. Diamandis: Planetary Resources, Peter Thiel, pre–internet, Ray Kurzweil, recommendation engine, Richard Feynman, ride hailing / ride sharing, risk tolerance, rolodex, self-driving car, sentiment analysis, shareholder value, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, skunkworks, Skype, smart grid, stem cell, Stephen Hawking, Steve Jobs, Steven Levy, Stewart Brand, superconnector, technoutopianism, telepresence, telepresence robot, Turing test, urban renewal, web application, X Prize, Y Combinator, zero-sum game

When I’m interviewing potential employees, I’m always more interested in what they’ve done than in what they will do. Doing something, doing anything, is always so much more important than just talking about doing it. The ratio of something to nothing is literally infinite. So make a plan. Set subgoals. Get busy. Even if the path is unclear, you’ll use what you’ve learned taking that first step to build toward the next, and the next after that. Results always follow. Charles Lindbergh was correct: “The important thing is to start; to lay a plan, and then follow it step by step no matter how small or large one by itself may seem.” #21: AN EXPERT IS SOMEONE WHO CAN TELL YOU EXACTLY HOW SOMETHING CAN’T BE DONE When I first dreamed up the XPRIZE, I went to all the major aerospace contractors looking for funding. They were dismissive. When the prize was announced, these same experts derided it.

For the exponential entrepreneur, the incentive prize is a mechanism for solving a personal challenge or a global injustice or bringing a new technology into existence. As I mentioned earlier, my original use of incentive competitions stemmed from my desire to figure out how to get myself into space. I had given up on NASA being my ticket, instead turning to commercial space flight as a way to develop both the technology and the wealth needed to get myself off-earth. But there was another impetus as well. In 1993, I received a copy of Charles Lindbergh’s 1954 Pulitzer Prize–winning book, The Spirit of St. Louis. This gift came from my dear friend Gregg Maryniak, who was then hoping to provide the inspiration needed for me to finish my pilot’s license (which I had started and stopped three times for lack of money and/or time). And it worked. I did complete my license, but the inspiration didn’t stop there. Before I read Spirit, I’d always believed that Lindbergh woke up one day and decided to head east, crossing the Atlantic on a whim.

module=Static&d1=support&d2=ratings. 20 Carolyn Johnson, “Thorny research problems, solved by crowdsourcing,” Boston Globe, February 11, 2013, http://www.bostonglobe.com/business/2013/02/11crowdsourcing-innovation-harvard-study-suggests-prizes-can-spur-scientific-problem-solving/JxDkOkuIKboRjWAoJpM0OK/story.html. 21 AI with Narinder Singh, 2014. 22 AI with Chris Anderson, 2013. 23 Richard Millington, “7 Contrary Truths About Online Communities,” Feverbee.com, September 22, 2010, http://www.feverbee.com/2010/09/7truths.html. 24 AI with Jono Bacon, 2014. 25 Jolie O’Dell, “10 Fresh Tips for Community Managers,” Mashable, April 13, 2010, http://mashable.com/2010/04/13/community-manager-tips/. 26 Seth Godin, “Why You Need to Lead A Tribe,” Mixergy.com, January 13, 2009, http://mixergy.com/interviews/tribes-seth/. 27 AI with Better Blocks founder Jason Roberts, 2014. Also see his pretty amazing TEDx Talk: TEDxOU—Jason Roberts—How to Build a Better Block, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ntwqVDzdqAU. Chapter Ten: Incentive Competitions: Getting the Best and Brightest to Help Solve Your Challenges 1 Charles Lindbergh, The Spirit of St. Louis (New York: Scribner, 1953). 2 Stephen Schaber, “Why Napoleon Offered a Prize for Inventing Canned Food,” NPR, March 5, 2012, http://www.npr.org/blogs/money/2012/03/01/147751097/why-napoleon-offered-a-prize-for-inventing-canned-food. 3 Knowledge Ecology International, “Selected Innovation Prizes and Reward Programs,” KEI Research Note 2008:1, http://keionline.org/misc-docs/research_notes/kei_rn_2008_1.pdf. 4 All Marcus Shingles quotes come from an AI conducted 2014. 5 Burt Rutan, “The real future of space exploration,” TED, February 2006, https://www.ted.com/talks/burt_rutan_sees_the_future_of_space. 6 Statista, “Statistics and facts on Sports Sponsorship,” Sports sponsorship Statista Dossier 2013, March 2013. 7 Alice Roberts, “A true sea shanty: the story behind the Longitude prize,” The Observer, May 17, 2014, http://www.theguardian.com/science/2014/may/18/true-sea-shanty-story-behind-longitude-prize-john-harrison. 8 See http://www.interculturalstudies.org/faq.html#quote. 9 Dan Heath and Chip Heath, “Get Back in the Box: How Constraints Can Free Your Team’s Thinking,” Fast Company, December 1, 2007, http://www.fastcompany.com/61175/get-back-box. 10 For all things LunarX, see http://www.googlelunarxprize.org. 11 Campbell Robertson and Clifford Krauss, “Gulf Spill Is the Largest of Its Kind, Scientists Say,” New York Times, August 2, 2010, http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/03/us/03spill.html?


pages: 370 words: 97,138

Beyond: Our Future in Space by Chris Impey

3D printing, Admiral Zheng, Albert Einstein, Alfred Russel Wallace, AltaVista, Berlin Wall, Buckminster Fuller, butterfly effect, California gold rush, carbon-based life, Charles Lindbergh, Colonization of Mars, cosmic abundance, crowdsourcing, cuban missile crisis, dark matter, discovery of DNA, Doomsday Clock, Edward Snowden, Elon Musk, Eratosthenes, Haight Ashbury, Hyperloop, I think there is a world market for maybe five computers, Isaac Newton, Jeff Bezos, Johannes Kepler, John von Neumann, Kickstarter, life extension, low earth orbit, Mahatma Gandhi, Marc Andreessen, Mars Rover, mutually assured destruction, Oculus Rift, operation paperclip, out of africa, Peter H. Diamandis: Planetary Resources, phenotype, private space industry, purchasing power parity, RAND corporation, Ray Kurzweil, RFID, Richard Feynman, Richard Feynman: Challenger O-ring, risk tolerance, Rubik’s Cube, Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, Searching for Interstellar Communications, Silicon Valley, skunkworks, Skype, Stephen Hawking, Steven Pinker, supervolcano, technological singularity, telepresence, telerobotics, the medium is the message, the scientific method, theory of mind, There's no reason for any individual to have a computer in his home - Ken Olsen, wikimedia commons, X Prize, Yogi Berra

On a bitterly cold spring morning in 1926, Goddard achieved success with a small liquid-propellant rocket dubbed “Nell.” Launched from his Aunt Effie’s farm, it traveled for 184 feet in a flight that lasted less than three seconds, landing in a cabbage field (Figure 6). Over the years, he conducted more than three dozen test flights, refining his designs and techniques until he reached altitudes of several miles. In 1929, he began what became a lifelong friendship with Charles Lindbergh, who shared his vision.16 Figure 6. Robert Goddard is bundled against the cold of a New England winter in 1926 as he stands by the launching frame of his most notable invention. The liquid fuel of this rocket was gasoline and liquid oxygen, contained in the cylinder across from Goddard’s torso. Nevertheless, the world was not quite ready for rockets. Goddard’s seminal paper from 1919, “A Method of Reaching Extreme Altitudes,” was ridiculed by the press and fellow scientists.

He did his pioneering experiments while being shunned by academia and scorned by the military. His early work was sponsored by a modest grant from the Smithsonian Institution. Then came Harry Guggenheim, son of Daniel Guggenheim, who owned mining companies and, by the end of the nineteenth century, had one of the largest fortunes in the world. Harry, a former Navy pilot and president of the family foundation, was a friend of Charles Lindbergh, who introduced him to Goddard. In 1930, Lindbergh received a Guggenheim Foundation grant of $100,000, which would be worth $4 million today.1 This support helped launch the Rocket Age. Goddard was so far ahead of his time that his work was unregulated. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) was formed in 1926, and it wasn’t until 1984 that the agency had a division to oversee rockets and commercial space travel.

Before attaining an MD, he started the International Space University, an institution that has produced 3,300 graduates and has a $30 million campus in Strasbourg, France. He also started a company named International MicroSpace to launch microsatellites, winning a $100 million contract from the US Defense Department. But Diamandis was overstretched and the company couldn’t deliver on the contract, so he sold it (for a fat profit, naturally). In 1994, Diamandis read Charles Lindbergh’s memoir The Spirit of St. Louis and was inspired. He learned that a hotel owner named Raymond Orteig had put up a $25,000 prize in May 1919 for the first nonstop airplane flight between New York and Paris. Nine teams spent a total of $400,000 trying to win. Lindbergh was considered a dark horse, an outsider with no backing and little aviation experience. He had quit college and spent his early twenties as a “barnstormer,” crisscrossing the country in a small biplane giving joy rides and doing aerobatics.


pages: 36 words: 8,421

Address Unknown by Kressmann Taylor

Charles Lindbergh

I began researching Hitler and reading his speeches and the writings of his advisors. What I discovered was terrifying. What worried me most was that no one in America was aware of what was happening in Germany and they also did not care. In 1938, the isolationist movement in America was strong; the politicians said that affairs in Europe were none of our business and that Germany was fine. Even Charles Lindbergh came back from Germany saying how wonderful the people were. But some students who had returned from studying in Germany told the truth about the Nazi atrocities. When their fraternity brothers thought it would be fun to send them letters making fun of Hitler, they wrote back and said, “Stop it. We’re in danger. These people don’t fool around. You could murder one of these Nazis by writing letters to him.”


pages: 376 words: 110,796

Realizing Tomorrow: The Path to Private Spaceflight by Chris Dubbs, Emeline Paat-dahlstrom, Charles D. Walker

Berlin Wall, call centre, Charles Lindbergh, desegregation, Donald Trump, Doomsday Book, Elon Musk, high net worth, Iridium satellite, iterative process, Jeff Bezos, Kickstarter, low earth orbit, Mark Shuttleworth, Mikhail Gorbachev, multiplanetary species, Nelson Mandela, Norman Mailer, private space industry, Richard Feynman, Ronald Reagan, Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, Silicon Valley, Skype, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, technoutopianism, X Prize, young professional

Within a generation, scientists and their families could be living on the moon and welcoming tourists. With NASA's shuttle now on the drawing board, it seemed as though this vision would soon become reality. By routinely shuttling back and forth to space, the shuttle would "help transform the space frontier of the 1970's into familiar territory," as President Nixon described it when announcing the program. Less than thirty-five years had elapsed between Charles Lindbergh's solo flight across the forbidding Atlantic Ocean and men setting foot on the moon. For more than half that time, visionaries such as von Braun and Krafft Ehricke had touted the feasibility and inevitability of man's thrust into space. Along with popular writers and filmmakers, they had planted the idea that despite the obvious dangers and limitations of space travel, space was a viable, even desirable, place to be.

Patience is a virtue, but persistence to the point of success is a blessing. M. The squeaky wheel gets replaced. 19. The faster you move, the slower time passes, the longer you live. zo. The best way to predict the future is to create it yourself! (Copyright 1986 by Peter H. Diamandis. All rights reserved. Laws 14 and i8 by Todd B. Hawley.) The idea for the x PRIZE competition took root in Diamandis's head in 1994 after reading Charles Lindbergh's book, The Spirit ofSt. Louis, which recounts Lindbergh's methodical strategy for winning the Ortieg Prize, awarded for the first nonstop flight from New York to Paris. The book was a present to Diamandis from Gregg Maryniak. Ever since their involvement with BEDS, the two had become good friends, fellow space advocates, and business partners. An avid pilot since he was sixteen, Maryniak took Diamandis up in a Cessna 172 on a crisp fall day near Princeton, New Jersey.

Burt Rutan The X PRIZE launch day, i8 May 1996, began with a celebrity-packed press conference announcing the prize and ended with a gala black tie event at the St. Louis Science Center, at which the prize garnered its first publicly announced competitor. Amid the VIP crowd, which included NASA administrator Dan Goldin, moonwalker Buzz Aldrin, and some twenty astronauts, as well as two of Charles Lindbergh's grandson's, Morgan and Erik, Elbert L. "Burt" Rutan stood up and became the first to declare himself in the race for the x PRIZE. Burt Rutan had created headlines a decade earlier for building the Voyager, a spindly, twin-engine aircraft that touched down at Edwards Air Force Base on 23 December 1986 after becoming the first airplane to circumnavigate the globe without refueling. In fact, Rutan had built a career pushing the limits of aircraft design and taking on projects that others thought impossible.


pages: 361 words: 110,905

Rocket Men: The Daring Odyssey of Apollo 8 and the Astronauts Who Made Man's First Journey to the Moon by Robert Kurson

Berlin Wall, Charles Lindbergh, cuban missile crisis, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Gary Taubes, Isaac Newton, low earth orbit, Mahatma Gandhi, Maui Hawaii, orbital mechanics / astrodynamics

He’d been interested in astronauts since the Mercury 7, the United States’ first group of astronauts, had arrived on the scene four years earlier, but space travel had never seemed possible for mere fighter pilots. Now, things had changed. It would be his dream job in many ways. Joining NASA would give Anders the intellectual stimulation he craved, the chance to fly the most advanced machines ever built, and the opportunity to become an explorer, a space-age version of Charles Lindbergh or Vasco da Gama, the New World voyagers he’d always admired. And he could bring back unknown rocks from his journeys to the Moon. And there was another benefit, one that resonated with a man whose father had fought back against America’s attackers, even when the United States wasn’t formally at war: He could do more in space than anywhere else to help defeat the Soviet Union. That night, Anders wrote a letter in longhand to NASA describing his qualifications: world’s greatest pilot; can solve all space radiation problems; jet instructor; great guy.

Millions of Americans considered astronauts to be the epitome of American courage. To Borman, Lovell, and Anders, that label better belonged to men like Pitts. Joining the crew of Apollo 8 and their wives at the black tie gala were twenty other astronauts, Chris Kraft and Wernher von Braun, and former NASA chief James Webb, who was to be awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom later in the evening. Also present was Charles Lindbergh, who’d stunned the world when he flew nonstop from New York to Paris in 1927. To many at NASA, despite his controversial political views, Lindbergh was a pinnacle aviation hero, a man who had taken to the skies to do the impossible. Before dinner, a small concert was staged in the East Room. When Valerie Anders took her place in the audience, she was dismayed to hear dozens of people coughing and sneezing.

On December 20, the day before the flight, the Soviets let the world know what they thought about Apollo 8. “It is not important to mankind who will reach the Moon first and when he will reach it,” said cosmonaut Gherman Titov, the second man ever to orbit Earth. Not many in the Soviet Union were worried. Even with the American countdown clock at T minus 24 hours, few Soviets believed NASA would be crazy enough to launch. That afternoon, Charles Lindbergh and his wife, Anne Morrow, joined the astronauts in Florida for lunch. Anders suspected the visit to be a public relations stunt arranged by NASA, but he changed his mind after hearing the passion in Lindbergh’s questions about Apollo 8. After a few minutes, the four men—and Anne, also a pilot—were immersed in conversation about flying. Not one of the astronauts resented the imposition on his time.


pages: 549 words: 162,164

Failure Is Not an Option: Mission Control From Mercury to Apollo 13 and Beyond by Gene Kranz

Charles Lindbergh, low earth orbit, orbital mechanics / astrodynamics, white flight

Mercury worked because of the raw courage of a handful of men like Cooper, who sat in heavy metal eggcups jammed on the top of rockets, and trusted those of us on the ground. That trust tied the entire team into a common effort. I took it as a good omen that Cooper, taking pity on a befuddled stranger, offered me a lift to the base. He was one of the seven former test pilots selected for the first class of astronauts. They had been introduced, unveiled like sculptures, in April of 1959. Instantly the media compared them to Christopher Columbus and Charles Lindbergh. Today, I wonder how many of them the average American could name. They were John Glenn, Alan Shepard, Virgil I. (Gus) Grissom, Wally Schirra, Donald K. (Deke) Slayton, Scott Carpenter, and Cooper. They were similar in size and build, partly because the design of the capsule ruled out anyone over five-foot-eleven. All of them were white, all from small towns, all middle-class, and all Protestant.

At this point in the space program, our communications network was actually run out of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. It had been named after Dr. Robert Goddard, the American pioneer in rocketry, who had developed rocket engine and guidance technology in the 1930s equal, if not superior in some respects, to what von Braun and his colleagues were working on as late as 1945. Goddard, one of my boyhood heroes, had had the backing of Charles Lindbergh, which enabled him to test his rockets in New Mexico, not far from the site where von Braun and his Germans would fire the first captured V-2 rockets in the late 1940s and test those that evolved from V-2 technology in the years that followed. The German scientists and technicians would come back to the Cape occasionally for selected launches (particularly high-profile manned missions), but they had their hands full at Marshall developing a new generation of rockets.

By the time NASA launch operations were forming up, American engineers were well acquainted with rockets, building on the experience of the Germans, as were the contractors producing the Redstone and Atlas missiles. While the new generation of American scientists and engineers was now doing the job, the first boosters in the manned spaceflight effort were barely adequate, as events would demonstrate. In many ways this technology was as “out on a limb” as Charles Lindbergh’s Ryan monoplane. He didn’t have any manuals either, and his facilities were primitive. Roosevelt Field in 1927 and Canaveral in 1960 had a few things in common. The massive Cape facility that would grow up in the next decade and soon become the Kennedy Space Center (which would include the largest enclosed space in the world, the vertical assembly building) was beyond our wildest dreams at the time.


pages: 396 words: 112,354

Apollo 8: The Thrilling Story of the First Mission to the Moon by Jeffrey Kluger

Charles Lindbergh, cuban missile crisis, indoor plumbing, Isaac Newton, low earth orbit, orbital mechanics / astrodynamics, white flight

Jim Webb and Wernher von Braun were also in attendance, as was Kurt Debus, the director of the Cape Kennedy launch facility. All three men were integral to the series of programs that had launched the astronauts into space, but they had never gone themselves and thus did not have the aura and never would. The only other person on the guest list who did have a bit of that special shimmer was Charles Lindbergh, the first man to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean. Now sixty-six, Lindbergh had taken a keen interest in the Apollo 8 mission and planned to travel to the Cape to watch the launch. Even the spacemen showed a respectful deference in the presence of Lindbergh. The rest of the guests—Vice President Humphrey, cabinet members, senators and representatives—would be mere extras and supernumeraries in an event that would star the aviator and the astronauts.

He accepted the entertainer’s best wishes, thanked him for his time, and then the little ritual was over. The public affairs officer nodded a discreet thanks to the astronaut and ushered out the celebrity, who would go home with a “guess who I met” story to tell. Borman, had he been going home at the end of the day, would likely not have done the same. More important—and more complicated—was the visit by Charles Lindbergh, which came later. Lindbergh had shadowed the astronauts down to the Cape just as he’d said he would, but he didn’t come knocking until the day before the launch. Borman, for one, didn’t know quite what to make of him. Both he and Lovell had been born in 1928, just one year after Lindbergh’s flight, and they’d grown up adoring the great aviator. Then, like almost every American of that era, they’d wound up reviling the man after he made common cause with the German Reich in the late 1930s.

“In the first second of your mission tomorrow,” he said, “you will use ten times more fuel than I used on my entire flight.” With that, the tarnished old flier showed his respect, making it clear that he would accept no more diffidence from the three young men who were about to make their own historic marks as pilots. * * * Borman and Anders would have a bit of time to reflect on the singular experience of having spent an afternoon with Charles Lindbergh, but Lovell would have no such luxury. While his crewmates had only the imminent mission on their minds, Lovell had his entire family to attend to. Three days before the launch, Marilyn Lovell had flown to Florida with her two-year-old, Jeffrey, aboard a charter flight arranged by one of the aerospace companies that worked as an Apollo program contractor; such firms invariably scrambled for the goodwill and touch of celebrity that came with giving a lift to an astronaut’s family during a launch week.


pages: 228 words: 65,953

The Six-Figure Second Income: How to Start and Grow a Successful Online Business Without Quitting Your Day Job by David Lindahl, Jonathan Rozek

bounce rate, California gold rush, Charles Lindbergh, financial independence, Google Earth, new economy, speech recognition, There's no reason for any individual to have a computer in his home - Ken Olsen

If you let that happen then it might as well be a thief breaking into your house and stealing all your business ideas—either way, you’re left with nothing to show for your asset. It’s much better to launch your product—even if it’s not perfect—and start to make money with it. Pop Quiz: Who was the first person to cross the Atlantic nonstop by airplane? If you answered Charles Lindbergh, that’s good. Now, who was the second person? If you know the answer to that—without looking it up—then you really do deserve congratulations. (It’s often credited to Amelia Earhart.) If you get your product out there first, you’ll be remembered as the Charles Lindbergh of that product. You won’t have to sweat who else comes out with one—you’ll always be able to tout yours as The Original and make fun of the imitators. Besides, Ray Kroc, Chairman of McDonald’s, was asked about all the other burger chains that sprang up after McDonald’s became popular.


pages: 218 words: 67,330

Kelly: More Than My Share of It All by Clarence L. Johnson

Charles Lindbergh, hiring and firing, RAND corporation, Ronald Reagan

I worked for him and others all through high school and junior college. And my mother no longer needed to take in washing nor work outside the home. My goal remained to become like Tom Swift, and I studied toward that end. Flint had an excellent public school system, and, as before, I enjoyed very much attending classes. The city had an even larger library than Ishpeming’s, and I quickly became a regular visitor there, too. It was a year yet before Charles Lindbergh’s historic transatlantic solo crossing would awaken the world to the excitement and potential in the air, but in 1926 there was enough stirring of interest that the city’s Kiwanis Club sponsored a model airplane building contest for schoolchildren. I carved out a model of my Merlin battleplane, and it won second prize—$25. That didn’t cause much excitement at school. I was always talking aviation, making it the subject of my reports when given a choice, and getting A’s in my studies.

He and Rogers had covered a lot of territory to the northernmost point of Alaska, 300 miles within the Arctic Circle, before the fatal crash. According to newspaper reports, they had stopped for three hours at an Eskimo encampment to repair a faltering engine. The engine failed again on takeoff and they crashed on the frozen tundra. Wiley’s wristwatch stopped on impact: 8:18 p.m. An Eskimo ran the 15 miles to Point Barrow to report the tragedy. Famed bush pilot Joe Crosson flew the bodies to Fairbanks, where Col. Charles Lindbergh, as a director of Pan American Airways, personally directed their return home. Tragic headlines of another day—these in 1937—recounted the story of Amelia Earhart’s disappearance on an around-the-world flight. “MISS EARHART MISSING OVER PACIFIC: ONLY A HALF-HOUR’S FUEL, NO LAND IN SIGHT, SHE RADIOS—THEN SILENCE.” Four columns with photo, maps, Earhart’s last dispatch to the paper, and the news story covered the front page of the New York Herald Tribune.


pages: 469 words: 124,784

Moon Shot: The Inside Story of America's Apollo Moon Landings by Jay Barbree, Howard Benedict, Alan Shepard, Deke Slayton, Neil Armstrong

Charles Lindbergh, clockwatching, gravity well, invisible hand, Kickstarter, low earth orbit, MITM: man-in-the-middle, operation paperclip, orbital mechanics / astrodynamics, place-making

The atmosphere thickened quickly. At fifty-five thousand feet he decided to override his automatics and deploy the drogue chute early to gain some stabilization. Glenn’s heartbeat was now at 134 beats a minute. The drogue chute came out. The auto sequences followed like clockwork, and Friendship Seven dropped into the water near the recovery destroyer Noa. John Glenn returned to Washington a hero of Charles Lindbergh’s stature. The nation flipped over the first American to race into earth orbit. The White House smiled, issued an invitation, and a quarter million people braved heavy rain to watch the astronaut pass. He was then hustled off to New York City, where four million screaming, cheering people greeted him with a tumultuous ovation and a ticker tape parade. The distance to the moon was starting to lessen.

President Johnson said it would cost each American $120 over nine years. He said Americans spent much more a year on cigarettes and alcohol. The defenders said the program would produce untold scientific and technological benefits and would demonstrate the nation’s ability to lead in an age of technology. Wernher von Braun entered the debate, arguing Apollo was not just a project to land two men on the moon but to open the new frontier of space. “When Charles Lindbergh made his famous first flight to Paris,” he said, “I do not think that anyone believed that his sole purpose was simply to get to Paris. His purpose was to demonstrate the feasibility of transoceanic air travel. He had the farsightedness to realize that the best way to demonstrate his point to the world was to select a target familiar to everyone. In the Apollo program, the moon is our Paris.”

Shepard believed absolutely that in almost every respect a man’s adult character is formed in his early years. He considered himself to have been blessed in many ways, not the least of which was having as a father a man with an innate ability to understand machinery. Making things work had been as commonplace to the young Alan Shepard as opening a book on flight, and he’d done that many a time. Even as far back as age four, when Charles Lindbergh had made his solo nonstop flight from New York to Paris. That’s when the love for aviation first had begun to grow inside him. And what had been given as this gift by his father began to reap rewards while still in his teen years. Alan Shepard became, in the classic sense, an airport bum. There is no deprecation in this term. The airport bums were those kids who hung out at airports, doing odd jobs, seeking eagerly to sweep out hangars, to wash airplanes, to run the fuel hoses and change oil and clean windshields, all to hear the hallowed words, “Hey, kid, want a ride?”


pages: 378 words: 121,495

The Abandonment of the West by Michael Kimmage

Albert Einstein, anti-communist, Berlin Wall, British Empire, Charles Lindbergh, City Beautiful movement, deindustrialization, desegregation, Donald Trump, European colonialism, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, global pandemic, global supply chain, Gunnar Myrdal, interchangeable parts, Isaac Newton, Mahatma Gandhi, mass immigration, Mikhail Gorbachev, Monroe Doctrine, Nelson Mandela, Peace of Westphalia, profit motive, Ralph Waldo Emerson, RAND corporation, road to serfdom, Ronald Reagan, Ronald Reagan: Tear down this wall, Silicon Valley, South China Sea, Thomas L Friedman, transatlantic slave trade, urban planning, Washington Consensus

Whether or not Donald Trump read The Death of the West, Buchanan’s book was the script for his campaign: the hostility to immigration, the anxiety about American greatness fading away, the mockery of perceived elites, the hatred of liberals and liberalism, the rejection of internationalism and military interventions abroad and the undisguised fear that a once predominantly white population was about to lose control. It would take a lot to make this America and this West great again.48 For his campaign slogan, Trump selected a two-word commentary on American foreign policy. Though it goes back to President Harding, “America First” had been more memorably coined in opposition to American entry into World War II. It was the rallying cry of Charles Lindbergh and others who prioritized the defense of fortress America above the defense of liberty in Europe. In a 1939 Reader’s Digest article, Lindbergh explicated “America First” as a civilizational mission. To be against foreign-policy internationalism was to be in favor of the West as Lindbergh understood it, without using the word West. In Lindbergh’s view: Another barrier between the teeming millions of Asia and the Grecian inheritance of Europe [is]… the priceless possessions which permit the White race to live at all in a pressing sea of Yellow, Black, and Brown.… We, the heirs of European culture, are on the verge of a disastrous war, a war within our own family of nations, a war which will reduce the strength and destroy the treasures of the White race.

Lindbergh’s racial panic was widely shared in the 1920s, not least by The Great Gatsby’s Tom Buchanan. By 1941, the likes of Lindbergh had lost out to the likes of Dwight Eisenhower and George Marshall, at least where party politics and electoral politics were concerned. (Eisenhower was no friend of the civil rights movement, but he did not base his idea of the West on racial panic; he based it on liberty and self-government.) By 2004, Charles Lindbergh was a figure so seemingly peripheral to the history of the United States that it was left to writers of fiction to imagine a world in which he was politically influential. In 2004, the writer Philip Roth released The Plot against America, a novel in which FDR loses the 1940 election and Lindbergh wins with a conspiratorial assist from Nazi Germany. Lindbergh was a fictional president and a counterfactual isolationist in power until his historical legacy was suddenly recast in 2016.49 Running against Hillary Clinton, the “America First” candidate did not merely repudiate Barack Obama’s legacy in 2016.

See Patrick Buchanan, The Great Betrayal: How American Sovereignty and Social Justice Are Being Sacrificed to the Gods of the Global Economy (Boston: Little, Brown, 1998); A Republic, Not an Empire: Reclaiming America’s Destiny (Washington, DC: Regnery, 1999); Where the Right Went Wrong: How Neoconservatives Subverted the Reagan Revolution and Hijacked the Bush Presidency (New York: Thomas Dunne, 2004); and Suicide of a Superpower: Will America Survive to 2025? (New York: Thomas Dunne, 2011). 46. Pat Buchanan, The Death of the West: How Dying Populations and Immigrant Invasions Imperil Our Country and Civilization (New York: Thomas Dunne, 2002), 228, 6, 9, 150, 208, 223, 229. 47. Buchanan, Death of the West, 4, 209, 10, 163. 48. Buchanan, Death of the West, 240. 49. Charles Lindbergh, “another barrier,” quoted in Painter, History of White People, 349. CONCLUSION 1. Angela Merkel, “I offer the next President,” quoted in Carol Giacomo, “Angela Merkel’s Message to Trump,” New York Times, November 9, 2016, https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/projects/cp/opinion/election-night-2016/angela-merkels-warning-to-trump. 2. David Cornstein, “with academic freedom,” quoted in Griff Witte, “Soros-Funded University Says It Has Been Kicked Out of Hungary as an Autocrat Tightens His Grip,” Washington Post, December 3, 2018, https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/soros-founded-university-says-it-has-been-kicked-out-of-hungary-as-an-autocrat-tightens-his-grip/2018/12/03/26bdfc28-f6ed-11e8-8d64-4e79db33382f_story.html?


pages: 69 words: 15,637

On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons From the Twentieth Century by Timothy Snyder

British Empire, Charles Lindbergh, Milgram experiment, Rosa Parks

The moment you set an example, the spell of the status quo is broken, and others will follow. After the Second World War, Europeans, Americans, and others created myths of righteous resistance to Hitler. In the 1930s, however, the dominant attitudes had been accommodation and admiration. By 1940 most Europeans had made their peace with the seemingly irresistible power of Nazi Germany. Influential Americans such as Charles Lindbergh opposed war with the Nazis under the slogan “America First.” It is those who were considered exceptional, eccentric, or even insane in their own time—those who did not change when the world around them did—whom we remember and admire today. Well before the Second World War, numerous European states had abandoned democracy for some form of right-wing authoritarianism. Italy became the first fascist state in 1922, and was a military ally of Germany.


pages: 377 words: 21,687

Digital Apollo: Human and Machine in Spaceflight by David A. Mindell

1960s counterculture, Charles Lindbergh, computer age, deskilling, fault tolerance, interchangeable parts, Mars Rover, more computing power than Apollo, Norbert Wiener, Norman Mailer, orbital mechanics / astrodynamics, Silicon Valley, Stewart Brand, telepresence, telerobotics

Figure 1.1 Jim Lovell on Apollo 8 aligning the optics for the Apollo guidance and control system. His left hand controls the spacecraft’s attitude, while his right hand points the optics. (NASA JSC photo S69-35097.) Human and Machine in the Race to the Moon 5 Human and machine: their relationship is not a new story. Indeed, it is one of the great narratives of the industrial world, from the mythical John Henry, who won a race with a steam drill at the cost of his life, to Charles Lindbergh, who used the word ‘‘we’’ to describe his partnership with his aircraft.2 Even during the 1960s, scholars and philosophers debated the appropriate trade-offs between automatic systems and human skills. Yet the many accounts of space travel have failed to explore this profound part of the venture. This book tells the story of the relationship between human and machine in the Apollo project and how that relationship shaped the experience and the technology of flying to the moon.

The complexity of rendezvous operations, however, also called for computational aids, from paper charts to digital computers. The Apollo program began with the new Kennedy administration and its recognition of the public, political impact of human spaceflight. Kennedy’s speech launching the moon program came just weeks after the suborbital flight of Alan Shepard, who was hailed as a space-age Charles Lindbergh. Yet the first contract of the new moon program was let not for rocket engines or fuel tanks or launch pads, but for a computer, the subject of chapter 5. Engineers at MIT’s Instrumentation Laboratory, who would build that computer, in the 1930s had helped change the nature of flight from ‘‘seat of the pants’’ intuition to numerical, instrument-based tasks. Their Apollo proposal derived from a Mars probe, designed but never built, and from the inertial guidance system for the Polaris nuclear missile.

This was Southern California at its 1950s best, as the serious, focused flyers enjoyed an evening in the heart of mid-century Hollywood glamour (figure 2.1). The fledgling society was barely a year old. To bolster its reputation the SETP associated itself with great names in aviation. On this evening, the group awarded honorary fellowships to Air Force General James Doolittle, the Ph.D.-educated test pilot who led the famous raid over Japan, and to Howard Hughes, the eccentric aviator and manufacturer. Charles Lindbergh had been offered a similar honor, but declined it, perhaps because he had never heard of the society (he would eventually accept the award twelve years later).1 ‘‘Honored guests, ladies and gentleman,’’ the evening’s keynote speaker began, quieting the room. He was Richard Horner, assistant secretary of the air force for research and development. Horner was himself a pilot who had flown in North Africa in World War II, earned a graduate degree in aeronautical engineering at Princeton, and worked as a test pilot (two years later, Horner would become NASA’s first associate administrator, the agency’s highest civil service position).


pages: 589 words: 128,484

America's Bank: The Epic Struggle to Create the Federal Reserve by Roger Lowenstein

bank run, Berlin Wall, Bretton Woods, business cycle, capital controls, central bank independence, Charles Lindbergh, corporate governance, fiat currency, financial independence, full employment, Long Term Capital Management, moral hazard, old-boy network, quantitative easing, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Upton Sinclair, walking around money

He turned down all speaking invitations, although he nourished the hope that Taft would be reelected along with a Republican Congress and that they would then pass his plan. Meanwhile, he tended to his stock portfolio and to his now finished mansion, whose centerpiece was a grand marble stairway in the entrance hall. The exterior, a rather “grim granite and slate,” his descendant was to write, seemed to have been designed to withstand a “siege.” With public passions so inflamed against Wall Street, Representative Charles Lindbergh’s resolution for an inquest into the Money Trust obtained new urgency. Democrats in the House had opposed Lindbergh, on partisan grounds, but they needed some alternative to the Aldrich Plan—that is, they needed a banking program that was more than just oppositional. The Money Trust hearings would be their response. The Democrats wrangled over the scope of the inquiry. Bryan favored wide-ranging hearings under the mantle of Robert L.

The Reserve Board, he suggested, would function as an “altruistic institution . . . with powers such as no man would dare misuse.” This was remarkably naïve. Frank Mondell, a Republican from Wyoming, was more perceptive—or more candid—in recognizing the bill’s landmark character. “Not only is its power, authority, and control vast,” he warned of the prospective Fed, “but it is of a character which in practical operation would tend to increase and centralize.” Charles Lindbergh, another Republican opponent from the heartland, violently criticized the bill—among other reasons, for authorizing the Fed to operate overseas in support of foreign trade. Lindbergh’s nativism was striking, since his constituents in Minnesota depended on exports and the congressman himself was an immigrant. But xenophobia had been a hallmark of monetary populists since the early days of the republic.

See also Link, The New Freedom, 227. Glass downplayed: Lester V. Chandler, Benjamin Strong, Central Banker (Washington, D.C.: Brookings Institution, 1958), 11. “altruistic institution”: Richard H. Timberlake Jr., The Origins of Central Banking in the United States (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1978), 192. “Not only is its power”: West, Banking Reform and the Federal Reserve, 118. Charles Lindbergh, another Republican opponent: Willis, The Federal Reserve System, 364–72. the debate in the House: Ibid., 125. For the gold standard debate, see Glass, An Adventure in Constructive Finance, 153; Coletta, William Jennings Bryan, 2:135; and Link, The New Freedom, 227. See also “Money Bill Passes House, 285 to 85,” The New York Times, September 19, 1913. “the unswerving determination of the President”: Willis, The Federal Reserve System, 438.


pages: 647 words: 161,908

Into That Silent Sea: Trailblazers of the Space Era, 1961-1965 by Francis O. French, Colin Burgess, Paul Haney

Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic, Berlin Wall, card file, Charles Lindbergh, out of africa

I think most of the youngsters responded to that. There were one or two that couldn't handle it, and obviously they dropped by the wayside. But that still sticks out in my mind. That's the lady that taught me how to study, and really provided that kind of discipline, which is essentially still with me." Shepard showed an early interest in airplanes and in the renowned exploits of his great boyhood hero, Charles Lindbergh. Over time, his bedroom became festooned with lovingly constructed balsa and tissue paper models, and his greatest problem was keeping his little sister Pauline (known as Polly) from playing with them. He and some friends formed Alan's Airplane Model Club, and they would meet in a shed connected to the barn to discuss their mutual interest. One unforgettable Saturday morning, when Shepard was twelve years old, the budding aviator got his first, albeit very brief and hazardous, taste of flying.

Later on, anytime we suspected something was going wrong, we'd advise the crew; it turned into a much more free and open exchange. But we were just utterly naive in the early days of Mercury. We were still carrying over some of the traditional ground role separate from the flight role we used in [airplane] flight test. Back home, the jubilation awaiting Glenn was overwhelming—national joy not seen since 1927, when America's "Lone Eagle," Charles Lindbergh, returned to the States after his solo flight across the Atlantic. Senators wept openly during Glenn's address to the U.S. Congress. A whistle-stop tour of several major U.S. cities culminated in a tumultuous parade through the packed streets of New York on 1 March 1962. In a powerful display of emerging "Astro Power," Glenn insisted on the presence of his six Project Mercury colleagues and their wives, prevailing over the objections of ansa administrator James Webb.

But heavy skies were not enough to prevent people from assembling dozens deep along the footpaths of historic Pennsylvania Avenue, ready to show their appreciation. First, however, there was a small ceremony to perform. A beaming President Kennedy officially welcomed Cooper to the White House and presented him with nasa's Distinguished Service Medal, telling the astronaut, "You have given us a great day and a great lift." He also hailed Cooper as a worthy successor to Charles Lindbergh, who had flown solo across the Atlantic that same day thirty-six years before. In a speech later that day, Kennedy would publicly applaud the achievements of the last Mercury flight and nasa in general by stating: "I know there are lots of people who say, 'Why go any further in space?' When Columbus was halfway through his voyage, the same people said, 'Why go on any further?' And they want to stop now.


pages: 585 words: 151,239

Capitalism in America: A History by Adrian Wooldridge, Alan Greenspan

"Robert Solow", 2013 Report for America's Infrastructure - American Society of Civil Engineers - 19 March 2013, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, agricultural Revolution, air freight, Airbnb, airline deregulation, American Society of Civil Engineers: Report Card, Asian financial crisis, bank run, barriers to entry, Berlin Wall, Bonfire of the Vanities, Bretton Woods, British Empire, business climate, business cycle, business process, California gold rush, Charles Lindbergh, cloud computing, collateralized debt obligation, collective bargaining, Corn Laws, corporate governance, corporate raider, creative destruction, credit crunch, debt deflation, Deng Xiaoping, disruptive innovation, Donald Trump, edge city, Elon Musk, equal pay for equal work, Everybody Ought to Be Rich, Fall of the Berlin Wall, fiat currency, financial deregulation, financial innovation, fixed income, full employment, George Gilder, germ theory of disease, global supply chain, hiring and firing, income per capita, indoor plumbing, informal economy, interchangeable parts, invention of the telegraph, invention of the telephone, Isaac Newton, Jeff Bezos, jimmy wales, John Maynard Keynes: technological unemployment, Joseph Schumpeter, Kenneth Rogoff, Kitchen Debate, knowledge economy, knowledge worker, labor-force participation, Louis Pasteur, low skilled workers, manufacturing employment, market bubble, Mason jar, mass immigration, means of production, Menlo Park, Mexican peso crisis / tequila crisis, minimum wage unemployment, mortgage debt, Myron Scholes, Network effects, new economy, New Urbanism, Northern Rock, oil rush, oil shale / tar sands, oil shock, Peter Thiel, plutocrats, Plutocrats, popular capitalism, post-industrial society, postindustrial economy, price stability, Productivity paradox, purchasing power parity, Ralph Nader, Ralph Waldo Emerson, RAND corporation, refrigerator car, reserve currency, rising living standards, road to serfdom, Robert Gordon, Ronald Reagan, Sand Hill Road, savings glut, secular stagnation, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, Simon Kuznets, Social Responsibility of Business Is to Increase Its Profits, South Sea Bubble, sovereign wealth fund, stem cell, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, strikebreaker, supply-chain management, The Great Moderation, The Rise and Fall of American Growth, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thomas Malthus, Thorstein Veblen, too big to fail, total factor productivity, trade route, transcontinental railway, tulip mania, Tyler Cowen: Great Stagnation, union organizing, Unsafe at Any Speed, Upton Sinclair, urban sprawl, Vannevar Bush, War on Poverty, washing machines reduced drudgery, Washington Consensus, white flight, wikimedia commons, William Shockley: the traitorous eight, women in the workforce, Works Progress Administration, Yom Kippur War, young professional

The New York legislature enacted a special charter for the General Electric Company to keep it from absconding to New Jersey. No state was more assiduous in wooing corporations than Delaware. By 1930, the state had become home to more than a third of the industrial corporations on the New York Stock Exchange: twelve thousand companies claimed legal residence in a single office in downtown Wilmington. The most powerful of the trusts was “the money trust,” as Charles Lindbergh, father of the famed aviator and a congressman from Minnesota, dubbed Wall Street, and the most powerful money-truster by far was J. P. Morgan. Having demonstrated his prowess in consolidating railroads during the great shakeout produced by the depression of the 1890s, Morgan extended his skills to a wider range of industries as the economy recovered, but overcapacity remained. The result was the great merger wave of 1895 to 1905, which saw more than 1,800 manufacturing firms absorbed into consolidations.

Trade union membership plummeted—the AFL lost about a million members between 1920 and 1925 alone—and trade union activism withered. In 1929, 286,000 workers (1.2 percent of the workforce) staged 900 strikes, compared with 4 million workers (21 percent of the workforce) staging 3,600 strikes in 1919. From 1921 through 1929, U.S. GDP grew by 5 percent a year in real terms—one of the best performances for an advanced country on record. America also witnessed one economic miracle after another. On May 20, 1927, Charles Lindbergh made the first solo flight across the Atlantic, signaling the arrival of a new age of globalization. (Calvin Coolidge dispatched a warship to collect both Lindbergh and his plane.) On October 6 of the same year, Al Jolson spoke the first words in the motion picture premiere of The Jazz Singer, signaling the arrival of modern mass entertainment. By the end of the decade, America’s share of the world’s manufacturing had risen to 42 percent from 36 percent in 1914.

The two most impressive laboratories of productivity were Henry Ford’s factory in Willow Run and Henry Kaiser’s shipyard in Richmond, California. Henry Ford built his gargantuan Willow Run plant thirty-five miles southwest of Detroit to produce B-24 bombers in less than a year. At its height, the Run employed more than forty thousand workers. Glendon Swarthout, a novelist, commented on the factory’s “insane, overpowering immensity.” Charles Lindbergh called it “a sort of Grand Canyon of the mechanized world.”54 The plant became more efficient as the war ground on, turning out 75 planes a month in February 1943, 150 a month in November 1943, and, at its peak, 432 a month in August 1944. Henry Kaiser was so obsessed with hitting the government’s targets that he revolutionized the entire shipbuilding business. In 1941, it took 355 days to produce a Liberty ship.


pages: 592 words: 152,445

The Woman Who Smashed Codes: A True Story of Love, Spies, and the Unlikely Heroine Who Outwitted America's Enemies by Jason Fagone

Albert Einstein, Charles Lindbergh, Columbine, cuban missile crisis, Drosophila, Edward Snowden, en.wikipedia.org, Fellow of the Royal Society, index card, Internet Archive, pattern recognition, Robert Gordon, Ronald Reagan, side project, Silicon Valley, X Prize

“The sky seemed full of them” Henry Steele Commager, The Story of World War II, rev. Donald L. Miller (New York: Simon & Schuster, 2001), 38–41. 213 telephones of Jewish families “Historical Background: The Jews of Hungary During the Holocaust,” Yad Vashem, http://www.yadvashem.org/yv/en/education/newsletter/31/jews_hungary.asp. America had no standing Charles Lindbergh, “We Will Never Accept a Philosophy of Calamity,” speech, Keep-America-Out-of-War rally, Chicago, August 4, 1940, http://www.ibiblio.org/pha/policy/1940/1940-08-04a.html. “danger to this country” Charles Lindbergh, “Who Are the War Agitators?” speech, Des Moines, Iowa, September 11, 1941, http://www.charleslindbergh.com/americanfirst/speech.asp. 214 British officers began to arrive British Security Coordination, The Secret History of British Intelligence in the Americas, 1940–1945 (New York: Fromm International, 1999), Introduction by Nigel West.

The Axis was growing bolder in the final months of 1940. Japan invaded Vietnam, expanding its empire in East Asia. The Nazis confiscated the private radios and telephones of Jewish families and cordoned off the Warsaw Ghetto with barbed wire, trapping 400,000 adults and children, most of them Polish Jews. America didn’t want war. Both major political parties still supported neutrality. The aviation pioneer Charles Lindbergh argued in popular radio speeches that it would be foolish and hypocritical to fight Germany. He said America had no standing to accuse the Nazis of aggression and barbarism because America had sometimes been aggressive and barbaric itself. Later he argued that American Jews were a “danger to this country” on account of their “ownership and influence in our motion pictures, our press, our radio and our government.”


pages: 347 words: 86,274

The Power of Glamour: Longing and the Art of Visual Persuasion by Virginia Postrel

Charles Lindbergh, cloud computing, factory automation, Frank Gehry, indoor plumbing, job automation, mass immigration, Nelson Mandela, New Urbanism, placebo effect, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Ronald Reagan, Saturday Night Live, Silicon Valley, Steve Jobs, Thomas L Friedman, urban planning, urban renewal, washing machines reduced drudgery, young professional

Even the practical costume of flight suit, helmet, goggles, or—that touchstone of glamour—sunglasses seems calculated to heighten aviators’ glamour, holding viewers at an intriguing distance.1 World War I aces, writes the historian Robert Wohl, “exemplified more purely than any other figure of their time what it meant to be a man.”2 That most aces died young only added to their ageless allure. After World War I, British fighter pilots were called “glamour boys.” The term was both admiring and pejorative, particularly among other military men. It drew a contrast between the celebrated knights of the air and the anonymous foot soldiers and support crews below.3 Charles Lindbergh: “You are that dream-self we all long to be,” wrote a fan. Library of Congress The twentieth century’s most glamorous aviator, however, was a civilian: Charles Lindbergh, whose allure after his 1927 solo flight from New York to Paris was as potent as any movie star’s. “You are that dream-self we all long to be,” declared a fan.4 What audiences saw in the young flier depended on their own ideals. To his American public, the clean-cut young man with a pioneering spirit embodied the best of their country’s heritage.


pages: 86 words: 26,489

This America: The Case for the Nation by Jill Lepore

Charles Lindbergh, colonial rule, desegregation, Donald Trump, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, immigration reform, liberal world order, mass immigration

Coughlin played into their hands. His audience heeded his call to form a new political party, the white nationalist Christian Front, in 1939, a year that twenty thousand Americans, some dressed in Nazi uniforms, gathered in Madison Square Garden, bedecked with swastikas and American flags, where they denounced the New Deal as the “Jew Deal” at a “Mass Demonstration for True Americanism.” America Firster Charles Lindbergh, who, not irrelevantly, had flown across the Atlantic, alone, based his nationalism in geography. “One need only glance at a map to see where our true frontiers lie,” he said in 1939. “What more could we ask than the Atlantic Ocean on the east and the Pacific on the west?” This FDR answered in 1940, declaring the dream that the United States is “a lone island” to be, in fact, a nightmare, “the nightmare of a people lodged in prison, handcuffed, hungry, and fed through the bars from day to day by the contemptuous, unpitying masters of other continents.”


pages: 370 words: 100,856

Moonshot: The Inside Story of Mankind's Greatest Adventure by Dan Parry

Charles Lindbergh, en.wikipedia.org, low earth orbit, Norman Mailer, orbital mechanics / astrodynamics, undersea cable, white flight

Cernan felt that Vietnam was his war, yet he was safely in America where he was regarded as a hero. The commander of US troops in Vietnam, General Westmoreland, had however managed to overcome any similar worries about where he ought to be and was also watching the launch from the stands. He was joined by cabinet ministers, foreign dignitaries, businessmen and half the members of Congress, together with a scattering of stars including aviation pioneer Charles Lindbergh, comedian Jack Benny, and Johnny Carson, host of NBC's Tonight Show. Nearby around 3,500 reporters from 55 countries were gathered in the press enclosure, their numbers swollen by the throng that had witnessed the astronauts depart aboard the van. It was a moment some felt to be shaped by the hand of history, and venerable reporters like Eric Sevareid found themselves ascending into lofty rhetoric.

In 1928 Gene left the military to become a stockbroker; through luck or judgement, he sold his stock just three months short of the Wall Street crash. Taking a job with Standard Oil, he travelled the world in a style that for an oil executive managed to include a good deal of adventure. He was commended by Mussolini, flew himself over the Alps, and crossed the Atlantic aboard the Hindenburg zeppelin. Gene subsequently became an aviation consultant, making use of his connections with Charles Lindbergh, Howard Hughes and Jimmy Doolittle.15 When Edwin junior was born, his two older sisters, Madeline and Fay Ann, came to call him 'brother'. Fay Ann, who was just learning to speak, pronounced this as 'buzzer', which was later condensed to Buzz. He saw little of his adventurer father, and was largely brought up by his mother, his sisters, Anna the cook and Alice the housekeeper. There was a sensitive, almost vulnerable side to Buzz, more pronounced than any comparable quality in either Armstrong or Collins.


pages: 390 words: 108,171

The Space Barons: Elon Musk, Jeff Bezos, and the Quest to Colonize the Cosmos by Christian Davenport

Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Burning Man, Charles Lindbergh, cloud computing, Colonization of Mars, cuban missile crisis, Donald Trump, Elon Musk, high net worth, Isaac Newton, Jeff Bezos, Kickstarter, life extension, low earth orbit, Mark Zuckerberg, Mikhail Gorbachev, multiplanetary species, obamacare, old-boy network, Peter H. Diamandis: Planetary Resources, Peter Thiel, private space industry, risk tolerance, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, Stephen Hawking, Steve Jobs, X Prize, zero-sum game

But he was ambitious and supersmart, and combined his aerospace experience with his engineering background to develop the simulator they were using for Rutan’s latest invention, a spaceplane called SpaceShipOne. “You could not get any more different,” Rutan recalled years later. “I wanted all three of these guys to be astronauts.” The curious-looking vehicle was Rutan’s entrant in the contest known as the Ansari X Prize, which was modeled after the $25,000 Orteig Prize that Charles Lindbergh won for his epic, across-the-Atlantic flight in 1927. Instead of crossing an ocean, the finish line of the X Prize would be reaching an altitude of 100 kilometers (62 miles), the barrier considered the edge of space. The winner of the $10 million contest would have to fly a manned spacecraft to that height, land it safely, and then do it again within two weeks. Another rule was that the spacecraft had to be built with private funds—not government money.

At a depth of nearly 3 miles, some 450 miles off the Florida coast, they had found the center engine of the rocket that first took men to the moon. SINCE ITS FOUNDING in 1904, the Explorers Club had been celebrating the truly adventurous, and have counted some of the world’s most courageous explorers as members, from Adm. Robert Peary and Matthew Henson, the first to reach the North Pole, to Ronald Amundsen, the first to reach the South. Charles Lindbergh was a member, as was Sir Edmund Hillary, the first to summit Mount Everest with his Sherpa, Tenzing Norgay. And, of course, it also celebrated those who pioneered space, including the crew of Apollo 11—Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, and Michael Collins. Every year, the club threw a lavish, black-tie awards banquet at the Waldorf Astoria in New York, where the cuisine was as adventurous as the expeditions its members routinely undertook.


pages: 431 words: 106,435

How the Post Office Created America: A History by Winifred Gallagher

British Empire, California gold rush, centre right, Charles Lindbergh, City Beautiful movement, clean water, collective bargaining, glass ceiling, hiring and firing, indoor plumbing, Monroe Doctrine, New Urbanism, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Republic of Letters, Silicon Valley, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, transcontinental railway, traveling salesman, upwardly mobile, white flight, wikimedia commons, women in the workforce, Works Progress Administration

Critics accused him of running his department like his legendary namesake department store in Philadelphia, but he used his business genius on behalf of average Americans to fight for Rural Free Delivery and broaden the meaning of “postal” to include parcel delivery and even savings banking. Despite the austerity imposed by two global wars and the Great Depression, the undernourished post nevertheless supported, for many years single-handedly, the infant aviation industry required for its Air Mail Service (an unknown Charles Lindbergh was among its pilots). It also linked citizens at home with their loved ones fighting abroad—in World War II with microfilmed Victory Mail letters (no lipstick kisses allowed). Deprived of funds and stuck with long-obsolete equipment and facilities, the post even managed to cope with the booming middle class’s quadrupling mail volume until 1966, when, amid riots, protests, and burning cities, the institution faced its second crisis, famously illustrated by the weeks-long shutdown of Chicago’s post office.

In 1928, Hopson was killed at the age of thirty-eight while flying the mail and a large shipment of diamonds from New York to Cleveland over Pennsylvania’s Allegheny Mountains, which were notorious for fog and tricky weather. Although untrue, the legend persisted that Wild Bill had made off to Canada with the treasure. Postmaster General Harry New attributed at least part of the 20 percent increase in airmail volume in 1927 to an obscure twenty-five-year-old Army captain and former pilot for Robertson Aircraft, an Air Mail Service contractor. Charles Lindbergh had just become a worldwide celebrity when he flew the Ryan NYP single-engine Spirit of St. Louis on the first nonstop trip from New York to Paris in just thirty-three hours. Nevertheless, when asked about his future plans, he said, “I am an airmail pilot and expect to fly the mail again.” Indeed, “Lucky Lindy” had mastered his craft during his earlier days on the St. Louis−to−Chicago mail route.


And Never Stop Dancing: Thirty More True Things You Need to Know Now by Gordon Livingston

Charles Lindbergh, Columbine, desegregation, follow your passion, Maui Hawaii

This degrading tendency, fostered by a culture of celebrity, not only leads to cynicism and a debasement of taste, it distorts our appreciation of persons of genuine accomplishment. If our heroes shrink, so does our sense of what it is to dare greatly, to truly achieve something. This is one reason I have a fondness for sports. While professional athletes are obscenely overcompensated and frequently flawed human beings, they at least provide us with images of competence and occasionally transcendence. You know I admire Charles Lindbergh. While it took considerable courage to take off in a single-engine plane across the Atlantic in 1927, the thing I really respect is that he reached the coast of Ireland only three miles off course after flying all night over 1,500 miles 43. 0738212494-text.qxd:0738212494-text.qxd 7/10/08 9:34 AM Page 44 And Never Stop Dancing of open ocean. While luck certainly played a role, this strikes me as an exceptionally competent piece of navigation.


The Road to Unfreedom: Russia, Europe, America by Timothy Snyder

active measures, affirmative action, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, American ideology, anti-globalists, Bernie Sanders, centre right, Charles Lindbergh, crony capitalism, Dissolution of the Soviet Union, Donald Trump, hiring and firing, income inequality, John Markoff, means of production, Mikhail Gorbachev, New Journalism, obamacare, offshore financial centre, Robert Mercer, sexual politics, Transnistria, WikiLeaks, women in the workforce, zero-sum game

Whether or not it would become a democracy was an open question; many of its influential men thought not. George Kennan, an American diplomat who would become his country’s outstanding strategic thinker, proposed in 1938 that the United States should “go along the road which leads through constitutional change to the authoritarian state.” Using the slogan “America First,” the famous aviator Charles Lindbergh called for sympathy with Nazis. The Second World War also taught Europeans that the choice was between fascism and communism, empires of the far Right or far Left. It began with an unstoppable alliance of the two extremes, a German-Soviet offensive military pact of August 1939 that quickly destroyed the European system by eliminating whole states. Germany had already demolished Austria and Czechoslovakia; the Wehrmacht and the Red Army together invaded and destroyed Poland; and then the Soviet Union occupied and annexed Lithuania, Latvia, and Estonia.

The slogan of Trump’s campaign and his presidency was “America First.” This was a reference to the 1930s, or rather to an alternative America of increasing racial and social inequality that was not met with public policy. In the 1930s, the phrase “America First” was used to oppose both the welfare state proposed by Franklin D. Roosevelt and the entrance of the United States into the Second World War. The public face of the America First movement, the pilot Charles Lindbergh, argued that the United States ought to make common cause with Nazis as fellow white Europeans. To say “America First” in the 2010s was to establish a point of mythical innocence in an American politics of eternity, to embrace inequality as natural, to deny that anything should have been done back then or could be done now. In Trump’s politics of eternity, the Second World War lost its meaning.


pages: 133 words: 47,871

Flying to the Moon: An Astronaut's Story by Michael Collins

Albert Einstein, Charles Lindbergh, place-making

As the days passed and the mice stayed healthy, our spirits rose, and finally, on August 10, 1969, the flight of Apollo 11 ended and we were released to the world. 12 The flight of Apollo 11 ended a remarkable part of my life. For quite a while afterward, my life really was different than it had been before. I received mail from all over the world, from common people and from kings, from a few people I knew and from thousands I did not know. I got a nice letter from Charles Lindbergh, who thought that my flight around the moon by myself must have been similar to his solo flight across the Atlantic Ocean. I heard from the children of Phil Nowlan, the man who used to write the comic strip “Buck Rogers.” They said that when they were children growing up in a small Pennsylvania town, their father told them all about exploring the moon, thirty years before it actually happened.


pages: 453 words: 132,400

Flow by Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi

Albert Einstein, Bonfire of the Vanities, centralized clearinghouse, Charles Lindbergh, conceptual framework, correlation does not imply causation, double helix, fear of failure, Ignaz Semmelweis: hand washing, invisible hand, Isaac Newton, job satisfaction, longitudinal study, Mahatma Gandhi, meta analysis, meta-analysis, Necker cube, pattern recognition, place-making, Ralph Waldo Emerson, the scientific method, Thomas Kuhn: the structure of scientific revolutions, Vilfredo Pareto

Some prisoners tried to escape by smashing through the barbed wire. For me there was no barbed wire. The head count of prisoners remained unchanged but I was actually away on a distant flight.” Not only prisoners report these strategies for wresting control back to their own consciousness. Explorers like Admiral Byrd, who once spent four cold and dark months by himself in a tiny hut near the South Pole, or Charles Lindbergh, facing hostile elements alone on his transatlantic flight, resorted to the same steps to keep the integrity of their selves. But what makes some people able to achieve this internal control, while most others are swept away by external hardships? Richard Logan proposes an answer based on the writings of many survivors, including those of Viktor Frankl and Bruno Bettelheim, who have reflected on the sources of strength under extreme adversity.

Returning again to the example of the car that wouldn’t start: if your attention is completely absorbed by the goal of making it to the office in time, your mind might be full of images about what will happen if you are late, and of hostile thoughts about your uncooperative vehicle. Then you are less likely to notice what the car is trying to tell you: that the engine is flooded or that the battery is dead. Similarly the pilot who spends too much energy contemplating what she wants the plane to do might miss the information that will enable her to navigate safely. A sense of complete openness to the environment is well described by Charles Lindbergh, who experienced it during his epoch-making solo crossing of the Atlantic: My cockpit is small, and its walls are thin: but inside this cocoon I feel secure, despite the speculations of my mind…. I become minutely conscious of details in my cockpit—of the instruments, the levers, the angles of construction. Each item takes on a new value. I study weld marks on the tubing (frozen ripples of steel through which pass invisible hundredweights of strain), a dot of radiolite paint on the altimeter’s face…the battery of fuel valves…—all such things, which I never considered much before, are now obvious and important….


pages: 409 words: 138,088

Moondust: In Search of the Men Who Fell to Earth by Andrew Smith

British Empire, Buckminster Fuller, Charles Lindbergh, cuban missile crisis, full employment, game design, Haight Ashbury, Jeff Bezos, low earth orbit, Mark Shuttleworth, Mars Rover, Marshall McLuhan, Mikhail Gorbachev, Naomi Klein, Norman Mailer, nuclear winter, orbital mechanics / astrodynamics, pensions crisis, Ronald Reagan

They were the ones who came nearest to the imaginings of popular culture at the time, as expressed in songs like Elton John and Bernie Taupin’s “Rocket Man” and David Bowie’s “Space Oddity,” or films like Tarkovsky’s Solaris (released in 1972 and since reimagined by Steven Soderbergh), where the gulf between terror and exultation collapses: a state best evoked on Earth either by drowning or going insane. Neither is this the fancy of a few artists: in his book Carrying the Fire, the Apollo 11 CM pilot Michael Collins reveals that his aviator hero, Charles Lindbergh, wrote to him, saying: “I watched every minute of the [first] walk-out, and certainly it was of indescribable interest. But it seems to me that you had an experience of in some ways greater profundity … you have experienced an aloneness unknown to man before.” In describing the experience of being on the far side, in the dark, facing out toward the impenetrable depths of the cosmos and separated from all humanity by the bulk of the Moon – out of sight and unreachable and utterly, utterly alone – Collins actually used the word “exultation.”

I’m also starting to feel an affinity with the astronauts, whose birth dates mostly fall between 1930 and 1935, because we both trailed in the wake of era-defining generations (they the World War II defenders, me the Baby Boomers), looking up to and taking our values from them, and ultimately paying for some of their delusions. And I suspect that this is why the astronauts are shaping up to be more complex than expected: by the time I’d reached junior high, flying in the military meant dropping napalm on little girls – only an amoral fool would choose to do it – but to them, flying was about the daring pilots who saved the world from fascism. Charles Lindbergh was their Hendrix, Amelia Earhart their Grace Slick. Of course they wanted to fly. Of course they wanted to climb onto rockets and fling themselves at the heavens. Yet, as we’ve already heard, the astronaut thing was an accident. Here’s how Apollo happened. John F. Kennedy was a perfect expression of his time. One of his more august biographers, Richard Reeves, suggests that the most significant thing about him was not anything he did or said, but his ambition.


pages: 759 words: 166,687

Between Human and Machine: Feedback, Control, and Computing Before Cybernetics by David A. Mindell

Alan Turing: On Computable Numbers, with an Application to the Entscheidungsproblem, Charles Lindbergh, Claude Shannon: information theory, Computer Numeric Control, discrete time, Frederick Winslow Taylor, From Mathematics to the Technologies of Life and Death, James Watt: steam engine, John von Neumann, Menlo Park, Norbert Wiener, Paul Samuelson, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, Spread Networks laid a new fibre optics cable between New York and Chicago, telerobotics, Turing machine

According to Mumford, when the neotechnic is fully realized, “automatism” in production progresses to the point where “in the really neotechnic industries and processes, the worker has been almost eliminated.” 2 In this vision people disappear from even the shiniest vehicles: for Mumford automobiles and airplanes were about gasoline and speed, not driving or piloting. However clean and electrical, machinery for Mumford remained inert and mechanistic, not actively involved with human beings. Yet even as Mumford wrote, people were entering into new, intimate couplings with machines, with dramatic effects. Just a few years before Mumford’s book, Charles Lindbergh flew across the Atlantic, blurring the boundary between pilot and machine. Lindbergh called his own account of the flight We to emphasize the collaborative nature of the feat—the hero was both the operator and the machine, their assemblage and their synthesis. “We shared our experiences together,” he wrote, “each feeling beauty, lift, and death as keenly, each dependent on the other’s loyalty.

Reprinted from the sales pamphlet Round the World with the Sperry Pilot , SGC Papers. After leaving the oil fields, Post found a job ferrying Lockheed Vega airplanes from the factory to customers. Here he gained experience with the problems of “blind flying” through clouds and bad weather, relying on early Sperry gyroscopic instruments to keep his bearings. In 1931 Post and his partner, Harold Gatty, who had trained Charles Lindbergh in navigation, made headlines by piloting a Vega named Winnie Mae around the world in record time (Fig. 3.3 ). 19 For the round-the-world flight Post grouped his instruments right in front of his one eye and modified the cockpit so that he could fly with one foot on the rudder pedals and one hand on the wheel. As Preston Bassett, president of the Sperry Corporation, later remarked, “All combined, the setup was that of a man flying around the world with one eye, one arm, one leg, and two instruments.


pages: 183 words: 51,514

Mission to Mars: My Vision for Space Exploration by Buzz Aldrin, Leonard David

Buckminster Fuller, Charles Lindbergh, Colonization of Mars, Elon Musk, gravity well, high net worth, Isaac Newton, Jeff Bezos, low earth orbit, Mars Rover, orbital mechanics / astrodynamics, Peter H. Diamandis: Planetary Resources, Ronald Reagan, telepresence, telerobotics, transcontinental railway, Tunguska event, X Prize

Over the centuries we have seen powerful reminders of those who explored beyond the boundaries of what they knew, from Copernicus and Galileo to Columbus. Jumping to the 20th century, it was on a windswept morning in 1903 at Kitty Hawk that the Wright brothers made the first powered flight. That same year, my mother, Marion Moon, was born. My father, Edwin Eugene Aldrin, was an engineer and an aviation pioneer—and a friend of Charles Lindbergh and Orville Wright. Taking a job with Standard Oil, my dad flew his own plane coast to coast. He later served in World War II in the Army Air Corps, coming home for visits. Born in 1930 and raised in Montclair, New Jersey, I finished high school there. Aviation was pretty much in the family. When I was all of two years of age, my dad took me on my first flight, the two of us winging our way from Newark down to Miami to visit relatives.


Hawaii by Jeff Campbell

airport security, big-box store, California gold rush, carbon footprint, centre right, Charles Lindbergh, commoditize, creative destruction, Drosophila, G4S, haute couture, land reform, lateral thinking, low-wage service sector, Maui Hawaii, polynesian navigation, risk/return, sustainable-tourism, upwardly mobile, urban sprawl, wage slave, white picket fence

* * * SIGHTS Charles Lindbergh moved to remote Kipahulu in 1968. Although he relished the privacy he found here, he did occasionally emerge as a spokesperson for conservation issues. Following his death from cancer in 1974, Lindbergh was buried in the graveyard of Palapala Ho′omau Congregational Church. The church (c 1864) is also notable for its window painting of a Polynesian Christ draped in the red-and-yellow feather capes that were reserved for Hawaii’s highest chiefs. Lindbergh’s desire to be out of the public eye may still be at play; many visitors fail to find his grave. To get there, turn left at the sign for Maui Stables, which is 0.2 miles south of the 41-mile marker and then veer left after the stables. The church is 0.2 miles further. Charles Lindbergh’s grave, a simple granite slate laid upon lava stones, is in the yard behind the church.

Take a close look and you’ll notice that the rock is cut from lava. Also noteworthy is the little cemetery at the side, where the graves are randomly laid out rather than lined up in rows. Even at rest, Hana folks like things casual. * * * THE ULTIMATE GETAWAY Hana may be a tight-knit Hawaiian community, but it’s certainly not a closed one. Over the years celebrities have fallen in love with Hana. Aviator Charles Lindbergh found his piece of paradise in nearby Kipahulu. Beatle George Harrison retreated to his estate in Nahiku when the world started pressing in. Woody Harrelson tucks himself back in the organic-gridless-communal Kipahulu area when he’s not busy acting. Singer Kris Kristofferson has long been active in the Hana community and actor Jim Nabors (aka Gomer Pyle) grows macadamia nuts nearby. * * * FAGAN MEMORIAL Rancher Paul Fagan often ended his day with a walk up Lyon’s Hill to enjoy the view at sunset – and if you’ve got time you might want to follow in his footsteps.

Kipahulu Less than a mile south of ′Ohe′o Gulch lies the little village of Kipahulu. It’s hard to imagine, but this quiet community was once a bustling sugar-plantation town. After the mill shut down in 1922, most people left for jobs elsewhere. Today mixed among modest homes, organic farms and back-to-the-landers living off the grid are a scattering of exclusive estates, including the former home of famed aviator Charles Lindbergh. * * * KILLER WEED According to legend, Hana folks once killed an evil shark-man who lived on a bluff near Mu′olea, the area between mile markers 46 and 47 north of Kipahulu. After burning the shark-man’s body, they dropped his ashes into a tide pool, but the shark man returned – this time in the form of limu make o Hana, the ‘deadly seaweed of Hana.’ The tide pool where the red seaweed was found was made kapu (taboo), though warriors learned to tip their spears with the toxin to make them more deadly.


pages: 184 words: 53,625

Future Perfect: The Case for Progress in a Networked Age by Steven Johnson

Airbus A320, airport security, algorithmic trading, banking crisis, barriers to entry, Bernie Sanders, call centre, Captain Sullenberger Hudson, Cass Sunstein, Charles Lindbergh, cognitive dissonance, credit crunch, crowdsourcing, dark matter, Dava Sobel, David Brooks, Donald Davies, future of journalism, hive mind, Howard Rheingold, HyperCard, Jane Jacobs, John Gruber, John Harrison: Longitude, Joi Ito, Kevin Kelly, Kickstarter, lone genius, Mark Zuckerberg, mega-rich, meta analysis, meta-analysis, Naomi Klein, Nate Silver, Occupy movement, packet switching, peer-to-peer, Peter Thiel, planetary scale, pre–internet, RAND corporation, risk tolerance, shareholder value, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, social graph, Steve Jobs, Steven Pinker, Stewart Brand, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, Tim Cook: Apple, urban planning, US Airways Flight 1549, WikiLeaks, William Langewiesche, working poor, X Prize, your tax dollars at work

That makes those goals vulnerable to the whims of an individual tyrant, or the blurred vision of isolated bureaucrats, or the echo chamber of groupthink. Those problems disappear, however, if the goals are defined by a peer network as well. That’s exactly the approach taken by the most celebrated sponsor of prize-backed challenges in the modern age: the X Prize Foundation. Now the source of dozens of million-dollar prizes in a wide range of fields, the organization took its original inspiration from the Orteig Prize won by Charles Lindbergh in 1927 for the first successful transatlantic flight. The X Prizes began in the mid-1990s, when the aerospace engineer and entrepreneur Peter H. Diamandis announced a competition that would spur innovation in the then nonexistent private-spaceflight industry. Ten million dollars would be awarded to any group that could carry three people beyond the earth’s atmosphere, approximately sixty-two miles above the surface of the planet.


pages: 175 words: 54,028

Fly by Wire: The Geese, the Glide, the Miracle on the Hudson by William Langewiesche

Air France Flight 447, Airbus A320, airline deregulation, Bernard Ziegler, Captain Sullenberger Hudson, Charles Lindbergh, crew resource management, New Journalism, US Airways Flight 1549, William Langewiesche

He had pared down his task to making the right decision about where to land, and had followed through with a high-stakes flying job. His performance was a work of extraordinary concentration, which the public misread as coolness under fire. Some soldiers will recognize the distinction. Sullenberger maintained his concentration through the water landing, the evacuation of the airplane, and the brief boat ride to shore. Then a strange thing happened to him. He was no Charles Lindbergh seeking to make history, no Chuck Yeager breaking the speed of sound. The Übermensch era of aviation had long since faded. But he crashed during a slump in the American mood, and overnight he was transformed into a national hero, at a time when people were hungry for one. At that point he began to concentrate again. After decades of enduring the insults of an airline career—the bankruptcies, the cutbacks, the union strife, a 40 percent reduction in salary, the destruction of his retirement pension—he was determined to leverage this unexpected opportunity to maximum advantage.


pages: 522 words: 144,605

Spitfire: A Very British Love Story by John Nichol

belly landing, British Empire, Charles Lindbergh, Etonian, friendly fire

With its revolutionary wings and complex engineering, the British fighter was a tricky machine to assemble. Under the muddled leadership of motoring magnate Lord Nuffield, the Castle Bromwich factory set up in 1936 to turn out 100 Spitfires a month was experiencing major delays. The First World War plant in Eastleigh, near Southampton, Hampshire, had to step up to the plate. But, as the American millionaire flier Charles Lindbergh, famous for his solo non-stop transatlantic flight in 1927, could not fail to notice on a visit in 1939, it lacked the chromium-plated modernity of Germany’s Regensburg production line.17 Lindbergh had been invited to Europe by Goering for a red-carpet tour of the ultra-modern Messerschmitt factories, where 2,000 fighters had already been assembled. He was invited to Supermarine’s Eastleigh works afterwards.

Churchill had asked whether the RAF could break Hitler’s air weapon. If this was the answer, it was not an answer he or the free world wanted to hear. * * * America’s support for Britain, vital in terms of materiel, was being openly questioned by Joseph Kennedy, the US Ambassador to London. If it continued, would it not be harmful to Washington’s future relationship with Germany? His views were gaining support. They were certainly backed by Charles Lindbergh, the millionaire American aviator whose caustic views on Spitfire production had already been expressed. It had been foolish to think the RAF, with little over 300 frontline fighters, could hold off the mighty Luftwaffe. Britain’s show of defiance was coming to a humiliating end. Hundreds were dying needlessly. It was far from being the nation’s finest hour. At the height of the rout in France, Lord Halifax, the Foreign Secretary, had hotly argued with Churchill to seek peace with Germany.


pages: 570 words: 151,609

Into the Black: The Extraordinary Untold Story of the First Flight of the Space Shuttle Columbia and the Astronauts Who Flew Her by Rowland White, Richard Truly

Albert Einstein, Ayatollah Khomeini, Berlin Wall, Charles Lindbergh, cuban missile crisis, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Isaac Newton, John von Neumann, low earth orbit, Maui Hawaii, Mercator projection, orbital mechanics / astrodynamics, Ronald Reagan, William Langewiesche

Halfway through his first school year in Florida, John’s mother, suffering from schizophrenia, was taken away in a straitjacket to Florida State Hospital in Chattahoochee. He hadn’t even known she was unwell, but she never returned from the asylum. Yet despite permanently losing his mother to illness, Young prospered, inheriting an intuitive talent for engineering from his father. And he lived and breathed airplanes, reading obsessively about heroes like Charles Lindbergh, Eddie Rickenbacker and Jimmy Doolittle, augmented by science fiction such as Flash Gordon, Buck Rogers and Edgar Rice Burroughs’s influential John Carter of Mars. A straight-A student at Orlando High School, Young seemed to excel in whatever he put his mind to, from athletics to physics. It was to take him to Georgia Tech on an ROTC scholarship and a BSc in aeronautical engineering, before he joined the Navy, which, in its wisdom, instead of sending him to flight training, informed him he’d be joining the crew of the destroyer USS Laws as a gunnery officer.

It was a combination that might have been designed to provoke PIO, and yet, while Joe Engle was aware that the STA might have a tendency toward it, it never caused him any trouble. In fact he was convinced it was an issue with the simulation, not with the Shuttle’s own flight control software. In the ground-based sims in Building 5, which after all were using exactly the same software as the orbiter, he’d simply never provoked it. Engle was a low-gain pilot. Like Charles Lindbergh or Chuck Yeager, he barely moved the stick, anticipating the need to do so and making small, necessary corrections in plenty of time. His inputs were smooth and progressive, never snatching at the controls. And in the relaxed environment of the simulator it was even less likely he would do that. In order to try to prove that the STA—and any PIO it suffered—was an accurate simulation, the program manager analyzed and compared control stick movements on three different simulators: a fixed-base cockpit that was bolted to the floor, the motion-based sim on hydraulic rams at Houston, and a vertical-motion simulator that moved through hundreds of feet in a hangar at Ames.


pages: 891 words: 253,901

The Devil's Chessboard: Allen Dulles, the CIA, and the Rise of America's Secret Government by David Talbot

Albert Einstein, anti-communist, Berlin Wall, Bretton Woods, British Empire, Charles Lindbergh, colonial rule, cuban missile crisis, drone strike, information retrieval, Internet Archive, land reform, means of production, Naomi Klein, Norman Mailer, operation paperclip, Ralph Waldo Emerson, RAND corporation

Foster Dulles became so deeply enmeshed in the lucrative revitalization of Germany that he found it difficult to separate his firm’s interests from those of the rising economic and military power—even after Hitler consolidated control over the country in the 1930s. Foster continued to represent German cartels like IG Farben as they were integrated into the Nazis’ growing war machine, helping the industrial giants secure access to key war materials. He donated money to America First, the campaign to keep the United States out of the gathering tempest in Europe, and helped sponsor a rally honoring Charles Lindbergh, the fair-haired aviation hero who had become enchanted by Hitler’s miraculous revival of Germany. Foster refused to shut down the Berlin office of Sullivan and Cromwell—whose attorneys were forced to sign their correspondence “Heil Hitler”—until his partners (including Allen), fearful of a public relations disaster, insisted he do so. When Foster finally gave in—at an extremely tense 1935 partners’ meeting in the firm’s lavish offices at 48 Wall Street—he broke down in tears.

The president, who knew that he was widely perceived as a friend of the Jews, wanted to avoid appearing too beholden to them. This became particularly urgent as the 1940 presidential election neared, with FDR aiming for an unprecedented third term. In the final analysis, the president believed that the only way that the people facing Nazi persecution might be saved was through U.S. military intervention against Hitler. And with prominent isolationist crusaders like Charles Lindbergh labeling the looming European conflict a Jewish war, FDR realized that this was another reason not to appear too impassioned about the refugee crisis. As the debate raged within the administration, millions of lives hung in the balance, including those on board the St. Louis. If Henry Morgenthau was the voice of moral imperative in Roosevelt’s government, then Breckinridge Long, the assistant secretary of state in charge of immigration, was its avatar of cynicism.

., 133. 20“rather impressed” with Joseph Goebbels’s . . . “sincerity and frankness”: Ibid., 116. 20“Juden” scrawled crudely on the door: Harold Bartlett Whiteman Jr., “Norman H. Davis and the Search for International Peace and Security” (unpublished dissertation, Sterling Library, Yale University, 1958). 20“those mad people in control in Germany”: Lisagor and Lipsius, A Law Unto Itself, 138. 21“somewhat similar views”: Charles Lindbergh, The Wartime Journals of Charles A. Lindbergh (New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1970), 283. 21Monitoring Dulles proved an easy task: Srodes, Allen Dulles: Master of Spies, 200–201. 22Stephenson was also willing to do the dirty work of espionage: See H. Montgomery Hyde, Room 3603: The Incredible True Story of Secret Intelligence Operations During World War II (New York: The Lyons Press, 1962). 22Stephenson was even authorized to kill: John Loftus, America’s Nazi Secret (Walterville, OR: Trine Day, 2010), 5; and author interview with Loftus. 22they sought advice from a British colleague named Peter Wright: Peter Wright, Spycatcher: The Candid Autobiography of a Senior Intelligence Officer (New York: Dell, 1988), 204. 23Douglas’s hatred for the “unctuous and self-righteous” senior Dulles: William O.


pages: 196 words: 57,974

Company: A Short History of a Revolutionary Idea by John Micklethwait, Adrian Wooldridge

affirmative action, barriers to entry, Bonfire of the Vanities, borderless world, business process, Charles Lindbergh, Corn Laws, corporate governance, corporate raider, corporate social responsibility, creative destruction, credit crunch, crony capitalism, double entry bookkeeping, Etonian, hiring and firing, industrial cluster, invisible hand, James Watt: steam engine, joint-stock company, joint-stock limited liability company, Joseph Schumpeter, knowledge economy, knowledge worker, laissez-faire capitalism, manufacturing employment, market bubble, mittelstand, new economy, North Sea oil, race to the bottom, railway mania, Ronald Coase, Silicon Valley, six sigma, South Sea Bubble, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, strikebreaker, The Nature of the Firm, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thorstein Veblen, trade route, transaction costs, tulip mania, wage slave, William Shockley: the traitorous eight

By the time the Great Depression struck, the state had become home to more than a third of the industrial corporations on the New York Stock Exchange: twelve thousand companies claimed legal residence in a single office in downtown Wilmington.21 Most of the other industrial trusts converted to holding companies, too. They, unlike Rockefeller, often did so at the instigation of the most powerful trust of them all, the “money trust,” as Congressman Charles Lindbergh dubbed the masters of Wall Street. Since the United States had no central bank, J. P. Morgan and a few other bankers wielded enormous power. The bankers made use of the new holding companies themselves to get around rules preventing them from investing in shares (Morgan, for instance, controlled a Philadelphia broker, Drexel and Company). Whereas most of the earlier industrial mergers were the work of company founders (Vanderbilt in railways, Charles Pillsbury in flour), the turn-of-the-century merger boom was, if anything, the work of “stock promoters.”


pages: 223 words: 58,732

The Retreat of Western Liberalism by Edward Luce

"Robert Solow", 3D printing, affirmative action, Airbnb, basic income, Berlin Wall, Bernie Sanders, Boris Johnson, Branko Milanovic, Bretton Woods, business cycle, call centre, carried interest, centre right, Charles Lindbergh, cognitive dissonance, colonial exploitation, colonial rule, computer age, corporate raider, cuban missile crisis, currency manipulation / currency intervention, Dissolution of the Soviet Union, Doha Development Round, Donald Trump, double entry bookkeeping, Erik Brynjolfsson, European colonialism, everywhere but in the productivity statistics, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, future of work, George Santayana, gig economy, Gini coefficient, global pandemic, global supply chain, illegal immigration, imperial preference, income inequality, informal economy, Internet of things, Jaron Lanier, knowledge economy, lateral thinking, liberal capitalism, Marc Andreessen, Mark Zuckerberg, Martin Wolf, mass immigration, means of production, Monroe Doctrine, moral panic, more computing power than Apollo, mutually assured destruction, new economy, New Urbanism, Norman Mailer, offshore financial centre, one-China policy, Peace of Westphalia, Peter Thiel, plutocrats, Plutocrats, precariat, purchasing power parity, reserve currency, reshoring, Richard Florida, Robert Gordon, Ronald Reagan, Second Machine Age, self-driving car, sharing economy, Silicon Valley, Skype, Snapchat, software is eating the world, South China Sea, Steve Jobs, superstar cities, telepresence, The Rise and Fall of American Growth, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thomas L Friedman, Tyler Cowen: Great Stagnation, universal basic income, unpaid internship, Washington Consensus, We are the 99%, We wanted flying cars, instead we got 140 characters, white flight, World Values Survey, Yogi Berra

‘Better Hitler than Blum,’ said the fascists of the coalition government led by Léon Blum, a socialist, who was also Jewish. France’s semi-civil war paralysed its politics and fatally divided the country in the lead-up to the Second World War. Of the main Western democracies, only the US and Britain had managed to keep the extremists at bay. Even then, however, the mob was influential. The popularity of the America First movement led by the aviation celebrity Charles Lindbergh, who admired Nazi Germany – and whose rallying cry was lifted by Trump – contributed to America’s near-fatal delay in entering into the Second World War. Britain’s 1930s Conservative governments were hopelessly divided in their response to the rise of Nazi Germany. Some wished to avoid conflict at all costs after the carnage of the Great War. Others openly sympathised with Hitler’s agenda.


pages: 908 words: 262,808

The Second World Wars: How the First Global Conflict Was Fought and Won by Victor Davis Hanson

British Empire, Charles Lindbergh, cuban missile crisis, deindustrialization, European colonialism, facts on the ground, friendly fire, means of production, mutually assured destruction, New Journalism, plutocrats, Plutocrats, RAND corporation, South China Sea, women in the workforce, zero-sum game

In truth, America, for all its economic follies, had probably done as well as Germany in combatting the Depression, even though Hitler’s showy public works projects received far more attention. Confident Axis powers boasted of a new motorized war to come on the ground and above. This gospel seemed confirmed by a parade to Berlin of visiting American and British military “experts,” from aviator Charles Lindbergh to British tank guru J.F.C. Fuller. Most were hypnotized by Nazi braggadocio and pageantry rather than examination of precise armament output and relative quality of weapons. Few guessed that the hugely costly Nazi rearmament between 1934 and 1939 had nearly bankrupted the Third Reich but still had not given it parity in heavy bombers or capital ships with its likely enemies. Mussolini and Hitler were far more frenzied leaders than those in Western Europe and America, and were able to feign a madness that was a valuable asset in prewar geopolitical poker.

Between five hundred and one thousand Luftwaffe light and medium bombers ruined about 40 percent of Warsaw’s mostly undefended urban center, resulting in some twenty-five to forty thousand civilian deaths. In the generalized dread of German air power that followed, few speculated whether the Luftwaffe would have had such an easy time had Poland had flak batteries, barrage balloons, and fighter squadrons, or late-model radar stations. The American aviation hero Charles Lindbergh—himself accorded occasional choreographed visits to the Luftwaffe from 1936 to 1938—had warned the military establishments of Britain and America of the excellence and diversity of the new German aircraft models, supposed reflections of the vitality of Nazism itself. In a personal letter to General “Hap” Arnold written in November 1938, Lindbergh implied wrongly that the Luftwaffe had become nearly invincible: “Germany is undoubtedly the most powerful nation in the world in military aviation and her margin of leadership is increasing with each month that passes.

For comparative fighter and bomber production: see Ellis, World War II, tables 92–94 (278–280); tables 17–46 (231–244); Angelucci, Matricardi, and Pinto, Complete Book of World War II Combat Aircraft, 414; Angelucci The Rand McNally Encyclopedia of Military Aircraft, 1914–1980, Plate 114 (251). 2. Alvin D. Coox, “The Effectiveness of the Japanese Military Establishment in the Second World War,” in Millett and Murray, eds., Military Effectiveness, Vol. 3, 4–5. Exaggerated Luftwaffe power: Murray, Luftwaffe, 60–61. 3. Murray, Luftwaffe, 28–38. Germany’s medium bombers: Murray, Change in the European Balance of Power, 44. 4. Yenne, Hap Arnold, 301–303 (Appendix 4: Charles Lindbergh Letter to Hap Arnold, 1938). Cf. also Lindbergh, Autobiography of Values, 180–182. See Olson, Those Angry Days, 14–18, 25–27; also Smith, Berlin Alert. 5. Re-creation of the Luftwaffe: Buckley, Air Power, 118–121; and see 126–128 on the air campaign in Poland. 6. Murray, Luftwaffe, 38–39. 7. Axis fantasy bombers: Horn, The Second Attack on Pearl Harbor: Operation K and Other Japanese Attempts to Bomb America in World War II; cf.


pages: 184 words: 62,220

Slouching Towards Bethlehem by Joan Didion

Charles Lindbergh, Donner party, East Village, Golden Gate Park, Haight Ashbury, Joan Didion, Khartoum Gordon, Mahatma Gandhi, Marshall McLuhan, Maui Hawaii, profit motive, sealed-bid auction

Why have we made a folk hero of a man who is the antithesis of all our official heroes, a haunted millionaire out of the West, trailing a legend of desperation and power and white sneakers? But then we have always done that. Our favorite people and our favorite stories become so not by any inherent virtue, but because they illustrate something deep in the grain, something unadmitted. Shoeless Joe Jackson, Warren Gamaliel Harding, the Titanic: how the mighty are fallen. Charles Lindbergh, Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald, Marilyn Monroe: the beautiful and damned. And Howard Hughes. That we have made a hero of Howard Hughes tells us something interesting about ourselves, something only dimly remembered, tells us that the secret point of money and power in America is neither the things that money can buy nor power for power’s sake (Americans are uneasy with their possessions, guilty about power, all of which is difficult for Europeans to perceive because they are themselves so truly materialistic, so versed in the uses of power), but absolute personal freedom, mobility, privacy.


pages: 628 words: 170,668

In the Shadow of the Moon: A Challenging Journey to Tranquility, 1965-1969 by Francis French, Colin Burgess, Walter Cunningham

Berlin Wall, British Empire, Charles Lindbergh, Isaac Newton, Norman Mailer, orbital mechanics / astrodynamics, Ralph Waldo Emerson, RAND corporation, X Prize

He was a very different kind of astronaut than most of those who had flown before. Edwin Eugene “Buzz” Aldrin Jr. was born on 30 January 1930 on the border of Glen Ridge and Montclair, New Jersey. His father, an aviation manager in the oil industry, had previously served in the Army Air Corps as a pilot and was one of commercial aviation’s pioneers. Edwin Aldrin Sr. had worked with aerospace pioneers such as Orville Wright, Robert Goddard, Howard Hughes, and Charles Lindbergh, and took his son for his first airplane ride when Buzz was two years old. Aldrin remembers both of his parents as strong willed, his father as being away most of the time, and, when he was home, as being “rather remote . . . an extremely intense person.” By the age of seventeen Aldrin was at West Point, from which he went on to graduate with a bachelor of science degree in 1951, placing third in a class of 435.

Almost everyone she knew had symptoms of the virus that month, and most of her close friends ended up following the flight on television while confined to their beds. Political showmanship had won out over a sensible medical precaution, and Valerie could only hope that Bill and his two colleagues would not get sick during the mission. As if to underscore the historic nature of the journey they were about to undertake, Charles Lindbergh visited the crew two days before the launch. Anders greatly enjoyed the meeting, but with the mission so close there was little time to appreciate it. “He was really a fine guy, one of my heroes. Now that I am into old airplanes I would have enjoyed it even more. But we were so busy training, getting ready, that I won’t say Lindbergh was a distraction, but it wasn’t the event that it could have been if it had been later.”


The China Mission: George Marshall's Unfinished War, 1945-1947 by Daniel Kurtz-Phelan

anti-communist, Bretton Woods, British Empire, Charles Lindbergh, clean water, Deng Xiaoping, facts on the ground, failed state, haute couture, land reform, long peace, South China Sea

If such appeasement continued, he took to warning, “all of Asia in less than a generation will come under Soviet domination by means short of war.” Wedemeyer had always concealed an element of perfidy beneath a surface of polished assurance. He had earned Marshall’s regard by brilliance as a planner and tactician in the opening stretch of World War II. Even then, however, he held the America First view that the United States had been tricked into World War I and counted the pilot-turned-arch-isolationist Charles Lindbergh as a close friend. Before that, Wedemeyer had been posted to Nazi Germany and come away persuaded that “however much one disapproved of Hitler’s methods, the feeling of the German people that he had raised them out of the abyss was real.” After the war, he remained fixated on the dangerous influence of Jews, especially in the “money-making areas”—part of a “planned penetration by certain exponents of contrary ideologies.”

Soong Papers, Hoover; The enclosed letter pronounced AW to CKS, 2 August 1946, AW Papers 81/2, Hoover. 251 reaction in key quarters AW to CKS, 25 April 1946, AW Papers 81/2, Hoover. 251 “I shall accept as gospel” AW to GCM, 4 May 1946, GCM Papers 124/8, GCMRL; Marshall’s folly AW to Hurley, 31 December 1946, AW Papers 93/6, Hoover; asking the Chinese embassy AW to Counselor, Chinese Embassy, 24 April 1946, AW Papers 92/28, Hoover; “Marshall’s own statements” AW memo on “Chinese problem,” 10 August 1946, AW Papers 90/6, Hoover; to Chiang AW to CKS, 2 August 1946, AW Papers 81/2, Hoover; “so long as our policy” AW to Yeaton, 8 August 1946, AW Papers 83/36, Hoover; he blamed traitorous State Department AW to Caraway, 24 October 1946, AW Papers 80/19, Hoover. 251 “Exactly what happened” AW to Wei, 9 August 1946, AW Papers 83/30, Hoover; “Apparently there was opposition” AW to Chen, 13 August 1946, AW Papers 80/22, Hoover; “all of Asia” AW memo on “Chinese problem,” 10 August 1946, AW Papers 90/6, Hoover. 251–252 America First view Pogue, Ordeal, 141; Charles Lindbergh AW to CKS/Madame CKS, 15 December 1947, AW Papers 98/17, Hoover; “Hitler’s methods” Spence, To Change, 266; “money-making areas,” “planned penetration” AW to Hurley, 2 December 1947, AW Papers 98/41, Hoover. 252 “I am so sorry” Keith E. Eiler in Bland, George C. Marshall’s, 106; Marshall despised Bullitt Pogue, Organizer, 476; Marshall read it GCM to AW, 28 August 1946, GCM Papers 124, GCMRL. 252 “death struggle” Papers Vol. 5, 645; He reiterated to Chiang the risks GCM-CKS meeting notes, 16 August 1946, Marshall Mission Records 4, NARA. 252 strafed Yenan History of the Executive Headquarters, Alvan Gillem Papers, MHI. 252 An order was broadcast New York Times 20 August 1946; American intelligence judged Military intelligence review, 22 August 1946, Naval Aide Files 18/3, HST Papers, HSTL; Party spokesmen called the Nationalists New York Times 17 August 1946. 253 “Chiang cannot be counted on” Summary of telegrams, 19 August 1946, Naval Aide Files 22/2, HST Papers, HSTL. 253 Truce teams History of the Executive Headquarters, Alvan Gillem Papers, MHI. 253 subtropical summer GCM to Spencer, 14 August 1946, GCM Papers 123/41, GCMRL; 90 degrees Papers Vol. 5, 650; only slightly cooler JHC to Betty Caughey, 23 August 1946, JHC Papers 2/10, GCMRL; malaria JM to Hellman, 29 September 1946, JM Papers 36, HSTL; “In the heat” JM to Hellman, 6 August 1946, JM Papers 36, HSTL. 253 “The old man” Carter to Davis, 13 August 1946, Marshall Carter Papers, GCMRL. 253 “policy of force” GCM to HST, 17 August 1946, Secretary’s Files 160/10, HST Papers, HSTL; He saw both sides Beal, Marshall, 164; “tornado of propaganda” FRUS 1946 Vol. 10, 249. 253 “The Generalissimo is leading” Papers Vol. 5, 663; He warned Zhou, “I am sitting” GCM-Zhou meeting notes, 29 August 1946, Marshall Mission Records 4, NARA. 254 “We felt there was nothing else” GCM-Yu meeting notes, 30 August 1946, Marshall Mission Records 4, NARA; He refused to return FRUS 1946 Vol. 10, 255. 254 admitted to being confused GCM-Zhou meeting notes, 11 September 1946, Marshall Mission Records 4, NARA; as did Zhou FRUS 1946 Vol. 10, 145; and Madame Chiang FRUS 1946 Vol. 10, 172; “dizzy merry-go-round” Melby, Mandate, 190–191. 254 fireworks displays were canceled Jeans, Marshall Mission, 148; “put down rebellions” New York Times 14 August 1946. 254 Marshall wrote back Papers Vol. 5, 661. 255 slacks, blazer Beal, Marshall, 163. 255 “The military situation” GCM to HST, 30 August 1946, Secretary’s Files 160/10, HST Papers, HSTL. 255 “some elixir” FRUS 1946 Vol. 10, 152; embassy’s contribution FRUS 1946 Vol. 10, 148. 255 parallel inquiry in the State Department FRUS 1946 Vol. 10, 58. 256 “encouraged by feeling dead certain” Beal, Marshall, 198; wanted it stalled FRUS 1946 Vol. 10, 753; wanted most of it still withheld FRUS 1946 Vol. 10, 996; shipments of airplanes Carter to Deputy Chief of Staff, 13 August 1946, GCM Papers 124/25, GCMRL; ammunition FRUS 1946 Vol. 10, 757; Nationalist officials GCM-Yu meeting notes, 5 September 1946, Marshall Mission Records 4, NARA; “It was just a matter” GCM-Yu meeting notes, 30 August 1946, Marshall Mission Records 4, NARA; slowdown would hardly cripple Westad, Decisive, 49; $800 million Chinese Embassy analysis, 2 March 1948, AW Papers 99/11, Hoover. 256 “surplus property” Military intelligence review, 5 September 1946, Naval Aide Files 18/4, HST Papers, HSTL. 256 “adding fuel” FRUS 1946 Vol. 10, 1053; press conference New York Times 2 September 1946; “You are confusing” GCM-Zhou meeting notes, 29 August 1946, Marshall Mission Records 4, NARA. 257 “are seeking by intense” GCM to HST, 30 August 1946, Secretary’s Files 160/10, HST Papers, HSTL. 257 “significant pressure” FRUS 1946 Vol. 10, 873; Much of Truman’s cabinet Wallace, Price, 608; even Forrestal was recommending Forrestal to HST, 15 August 1946, Secretary’s Files 151/9, HST Papers, HSTL; “Those who have anything” Lynch to GCM, 2 August 1946, GCM Papers 123/15, GCMRL; “It may have been right” Torkel to GCM, 30 July 1946, GCM Papers 124/2, GCMRL. 257 “It is anticipated” Timberman to McConnell, 23 August 1946, Timberman-Fiske Papers, MHI. 258 armies to wage war in places like Manchuria GCM to Acheson, 28 August 1946, Marshall Mission Records 2, NARA. 258 Marshall saw the ambush GCM-Zhou meeting notes, 15 August 1946, Marshall Mission Records 4, NARA; “it would be a victory” FRUS 1946 Vol. 10, 874. 258 “there is no reason” Chang to GCM, 10 August 1946, GCM Papers 122/13, GCMRL; a force capable of balancing FRUS 1946 Vol. 10, 830. 258 “advocate discussion groups” JM to Hellman, 16 November 1945, JM Papers 36, HSTL; “stand between the two primitive giants” Melby, Mandate, 200; “They are learning” JM to Hellman, 6 August 1946, JM Papers 36, HSTL. 259 walking with Katherine in the moonlight JM to Hellman, 29 September 1946, JM Papers 36, HSTL. 259 “formal invitation to Russia” Papers Vol. 5, 663; “false power” FRUS 1946 Vol. 10, 170. 259 “pressure does not work” Qin, Chronicles, Vol. 6.1, 2990; Chiang simply refused CKS diary, 19 August 1946, Hoover; major push in Rehe Military intelligence review, 5 September 1946, Naval Aide Files 18/4, HST Papers, HSTL; evaded conversation CKS diary, 25 August 1946, Hoover; “He can use the sale of goods” CKS diary, 2 September 1946, Hoover; “to install a totalitarian” FRUS 1946 Vol. 10, 92; Truman promptly wrote back FRUS 1946 Vol. 10, 147; “We can get along” Beal, Marshall, 181. 260 “I am not” GCM-Zhou meeting notes, 5 September1946, Marshall Mission Records 4, NARA; sincerely FRUS 1946 Vol. 10, 89; his last trump card GCM to HST, 6 September 1946, Secretary’s Files 160/10, HST Papers, HSTL; National Assembly on his terms CKS diary, 9 September 1946, Hoover; Only military defeat GCM to HST, 13 September 1946, Secretary’s Files 160/10, HST Papers, HSTL. 260 by October GCM-Zhou meeting notes, 4 September1946, Marshall Mission Records 4, NARA; “a somewhat Chinese view” GCM to HST, 30 August 1946, Secretary’s Files 160/10, HST Papers, HSTL; he conceded to Truman GCM to HST, 13 September 1946, Secretary’s Files 160/10, HST Papers, HSTL. 260 sat Katherine down, “Only he” Bland, George C.


pages: 207 words: 64,598

To Show and to Tell: The Craft of Literary Nonfiction by Phillip Lopate

Charles Lindbergh, Columbine, desegregation, fear of failure, index card, Jane Jacobs, Joan Didion, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Nelson Mandela, Norman Mailer, Panopticon Jeremy Bentham, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Republic of Letters, Ronald Reagan, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, urban planning, white flight

I once heard Philip Roth deliver a talk on his latest novel, The Plot against America. What struck me most was this great writer saying that every night he would go to bed reminding himself, “Don’t invent, remember.” Sure enough, the first two-thirds of that novel are remarkable for the plausible way that everyday events come across, seeming so close to remembered fact; it’s only in the last third, when the plot gets all speeded up and absurd, and Charles Lindbergh becomes the right-wing president, that the book loses its poise and turns overly gimmicky. We should not be so in awe of invention; it can be a fairly cheap knack. We also need to recognize that some of our best recent writers were arguably better at nonfiction than fiction. Though they usually preferred to think of themselves as novelists, none of them ever created a character as vibrant as his/her nonfiction narrator, be it Mary McCarthy, George Orwell, James Baldwin, Gore Vidal, Norman Mailer (“Aquarius”), Susan Sontag, or Joan Didion.


pages: 239 words: 69,496

The Wisdom of Finance: Discovering Humanity in the World of Risk and Return by Mihir Desai

activist fund / activist shareholder / activist investor, Albert Einstein, Andrei Shleifer, assortative mating, Benoit Mandelbrot, Brownian motion, capital asset pricing model, carried interest, Charles Lindbergh, collective bargaining, corporate governance, corporate raider, discounted cash flows, diversified portfolio, Eugene Fama: efficient market hypothesis, financial innovation, follow your passion, George Akerlof, Gordon Gekko, greed is good, housing crisis, income inequality, information asymmetry, Isaac Newton, Jony Ive, Kenneth Rogoff, longitudinal study, Louis Bachelier, moral hazard, Myron Scholes, new economy, out of africa, Paul Samuelson, Pierre-Simon Laplace, principal–agent problem, Ralph Waldo Emerson, random walk, risk/return, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, Ronald Coase, Silicon Valley, Steve Jobs, Thales and the olive presses, Thales of Miletus, The Market for Lemons, The Nature of the Firm, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Tim Cook: Apple, transaction costs, zero-sum game

Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1995. A middle ground of sorts is provided by Williamson, Oliver E. Markets and Hierarchies: Analysis and Antitrust Implications: A Study in the Economics of Internal Organization. New York: Free Press, 1983. The account of the Ford-Firestone partnership and breakup is based on Newton, James. Uncommon Friends: Life with Thomas Edison, Henry Ford, Harvey Firestone, Alexis Carrel, and Charles Lindbergh. New York: Mariner Books, 1989; Aeppel, Timothy, Joseph B. White, and Stephen Power. “Bridgestone’s Firestone Quits Relationship of 95 Years as Supplier of Tires to Ford.” Wall Street Journal, May 21, 2001; “Firestone Ends Ties with Ford.” Digital Journal, May 22, 2001. http://www.digitaljournal.com/article/32720; Lampe, John T. John T. Lampe to Jacques Nasser. “The Firestone-Ford Break-up Letter.”


pages: 272 words: 71,487

Getting Better: Why Global Development Is Succeeding--And How We Can Improve the World Even More by Charles Kenny

"Robert Solow", agricultural Revolution, Berlin Wall, British Empire, Charles Lindbergh, clean water, demographic transition, double entry bookkeeping, experimental subject, Fall of the Berlin Wall, germ theory of disease, Gunnar Myrdal, income inequality, income per capita, Indoor air pollution, inventory management, Kickstarter, Milgram experiment, off grid, open borders, purchasing power parity, randomized controlled trial, structural adjustment programs, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, total factor productivity, Toyota Production System, trade liberalization, transaction costs, very high income, Washington Consensus, X Prize

The advance purchase model might also be used to purchase new seed varieties with particular attributes designed to increase yields in Africa, for example, or to buy off-grid renewable power sources that could work reliably and cheaply in developing country settings. Another approach is that of using prizes to provide an incentive to research. Prizes played a role in the development of accurate timepieces required to measure longitude at sea; they also provided the incentive for Charles Lindbergh to fly across the Atlantic nonstop. More recently the model has been exploited by the X-Prize Foundation, which offered $10 million to the first company to launch a reusable three-passenger vehicle one hundred kilometers into space twice within two weeks. The foundation is already working to develop a prize based around the creation of a cheap and effective diagnostic tool for tuberculosis and is considering a range of prizes in education.


pages: 564 words: 178,408

Citizens of London: The Americans Who Stood With Britain in Its Darkest, Finest Hour by Lynne Olson

Alistair Cooke, Bretton Woods, British Empire, Charles Lindbergh, colonial rule, European colonialism, financial independence, full employment, imperial preference, indoor plumbing, jobless men, old-boy network, South China Sea

Not yet aware of how serious their offense was regarded by the U.S. powers-that-be, three of the earliest volunteers checked in at the American embassy in London in June 1940, only to be attacked by Kennedy for “jeopardizing U.S. neutrality” and ordered back to the United States on the next ship. Instead, they headed straight for the British Air Ministry, enlisting in time to fly in the Battle of Britain. The Americans who joined the RAF had grown up in the age of Charles Lindbergh, when the mere idea of aviation captivated young people all over the world. Most of them already were experienced fliers. Some had dusted crops for a living; some were barnstormers and stunt pilots; one was a pilot for the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer studio in Los Angeles, whose job had been to ferry movie stars and other Hollywood VIPs around California. They had come to England for a variety of reasons, but most had one trait in common: an addiction to excitement, danger, and speed.

Everywhere he went in New York over the next few weeks, he was followed by autograph seekers, photographers, and newspaper and magazine writers begging for interviews. As unsettling as this celebrity was for Murrow, he had even more difficulty coming to grips with America’s continued refusal to commit itself to war. When he arrived, he found the isolationists in full cry—an “America First” rally at Madison Square Garden, Senator Burton Wheeler and Charles Lindbergh escalating their demands that Roosevelt keep the country at peace. Although isolationist leaders were gradually losing support in the country, they had become considerably more strident and aggressive in their attacks on the president and his administration. The interventionist movement was equally outspoken in firing back. It was, said one historian, “a period of loud noise in the nation.”


pages: 603 words: 182,781

Aerotropolis by John D. Kasarda, Greg Lindsay

3D printing, air freight, airline deregulation, airport security, Akira Okazaki, Asian financial crisis, back-to-the-land, barriers to entry, Berlin Wall, big-box store, blood diamonds, borderless world, Boris Johnson, British Empire, business cycle, call centre, carbon footprint, Cesare Marchetti: Marchetti’s constant, Charles Lindbergh, Clayton Christensen, cleantech, cognitive dissonance, commoditize, conceptual framework, credit crunch, David Brooks, David Ricardo: comparative advantage, Deng Xiaoping, deskilling, digital map, disruptive innovation, edge city, Edward Glaeser, failed state, food miles, Ford paid five dollars a day, Frank Gehry, fudge factor, full employment, future of work, Geoffrey West, Santa Fe Institute, George Gilder, global supply chain, global village, gravity well, Haber-Bosch Process, Hernando de Soto, hive mind, if you build it, they will come, illegal immigration, inflight wifi, intangible asset, interchangeable parts, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), intermodal, invention of the telephone, inventory management, invisible hand, Jane Jacobs, Jeff Bezos, Joan Didion, Kangaroo Route, Kickstarter, knowledge worker, kremlinology, low cost airline, Marchetti’s constant, Marshall McLuhan, Masdar, mass immigration, McMansion, megacity, Menlo Park, microcredit, Network effects, New Economic Geography, new economy, New Urbanism, oil shale / tar sands, oil shock, peak oil, Pearl River Delta, Peter Calthorpe, Peter Thiel, pets.com, pink-collar, pre–internet, RFID, Richard Florida, Ronald Coase, Ronald Reagan, Rubik’s Cube, savings glut, Seaside, Florida, Shenzhen was a fishing village, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, Skype, smart cities, smart grid, South China Sea, South Sea Bubble, sovereign wealth fund, special economic zone, spice trade, spinning jenny, starchitect, stem cell, Steve Jobs, supply-chain management, sustainable-tourism, telepresence, the built environment, The Chicago School, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, The Nature of the Firm, thinkpad, Thomas L Friedman, Thomas Malthus, Tony Hsieh, trade route, transcontinental railway, transit-oriented development, traveling salesman, trickle-down economics, upwardly mobile, urban planning, urban renewal, urban sprawl, walkable city, white flight, white picket fence, Yogi Berra, zero-sum game

In Amsterdam, I learned how flowers portended the airborne future of food, and while connecting through India, China, and Dubai, I met the traders who traverse the New Silk Road. The aim of this book is to tell the story of how these things went from being impossible to inevitable. 1 A TALE OF THREE CITIES Los Angeles, Washington, and Chicago are the sum of their airports. Without room to expand them, they face limits to growth. Los Angeles: Neighbors, Noise, and NIMBY In 1926, a year before Charles Lindbergh flew solo across the Atlantic and two years before the first Academy Awards, the burghers of Los Angeles were worried they didn’t have an airport. In fact, they had too many. There were fifty-two landing strips in LA County that year— mostly dirt, with a windsock and maybe a barn doubling as a hangar. But forty-seven were in private hands, and there was no municipal field open to all comers.

Ford Airport was the world’s first to be equipped with floodlights, paved runways, two-way radios, and a terminal. There was even an airport hotel. Needing someone to buy his planes and somewhere to fly them, he launched Ford Airlines, also a first. His fleet of Tri-Motors ferried passengers, auto parts, and airmail between Dearborn and Chicago until 1933, when he closed both the airline and the factory. (Always a trailblazer, he’d never turned a profit.) Charles Lindbergh and Amelia Earhart were customers, while TWA started cross-country service using Tri-Motors in 1929. The airport was later paved over for an automobile test track and proving grounds; drivers still swerve around traces of the runways. But Ford wasn’t finished. He never mass-produced the Tin Goose the way he had the Model T. He was given a second chance during World War II, when the army charged him with building an armada of bombers.


pages: 684 words: 188,584

The Age of Radiance: The Epic Rise and Dramatic Fall of the Atomic Era by Craig Nelson

Albert Einstein, Brownian motion, Charles Lindbergh, cognitive dissonance, Columbine, continuation of politics by other means, corporate governance, cuban missile crisis, dark matter, Doomsday Clock, El Camino Real, Ernest Rutherford, failed state, Henri Poincaré, hive mind, Isaac Newton, John von Neumann, Louis Pasteur, low earth orbit, Menlo Park, Mikhail Gorbachev, music of the spheres, mutually assured destruction, nuclear winter, oil shale / tar sands, Project Plowshare, Ralph Nader, Richard Feynman, Ronald Reagan, Skype, Stuxnet, technoutopianism, too big to fail, uranium enrichment, William Langewiesche, éminence grise

Szilard: “We did not know just how many words one could put in a letter which a president is supposed to read.” Janet thought Leo was a crackpot, and she would continue to think this until 1945, when she learned of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. At war’s end, Einstein insisted that, with his letter to FDR, “he really only acted as a mailbox” for Leo Szilard. Szilard and Einstein then thought they might ask Charles Lindbergh to discuss the matter with FDR, but learned soon enough that the president and the aviator were politically opposed and thus returned to Sachs, who met with the president on October 11 and 12, bringing Einstein’s letter for FDR to read directly: Albert Einstein Old Grove Rd. Nassau Point Peconic, Long Island August 2nd 1939 F.D. Roosevelt President of the United States White House Washington, D.C.

On September 3, 1939, news arrived that a Nazi submarine had torpedoed the ocean liner Athenia, which was sinking off the shores of Scotland. John Lawrence, Ernest’s brother, had been in Britain lecturing on the Rad Lab’s medical achievements. He was on that ship and it took two days to learn that he was safe. Previously, Ernest was a die-hard midwestern noninterventionist firmly in the camp of Charles Lindbergh, who believed Europe’s troubles were none of America’s business. Nearly losing his brother made Ernest fervently change course. Then, on November 9, he won his Nobel for inventing the cyclotron. In December 1940, Segrè and Lawrence met with Fermi and Columbia’s Pegram to mull over the cyclotron’s recent breakthrough of forcing U-238 to capture a neutron and produce a new element—#93, neptunium.


The Spirit of ST Louis by Charles A. Lindbergh

Charles Lindbergh, intangible asset, Mercator projection

Her voice is insistent, and a little annoyed now. Somehow I've got to break through this. "I am calling on long distance from St. Louis, Missouri. I want to talk to one of the Wright Corporation's executive officers—on business." I say it slowly and firmly to impress her. Apparently it does. "Hold on a minute, please." The next voice is a man's. "I'm calling from St. Louis," I repeat. "My name is Charles Lindbergh. I represent a group of men here who are interested in buying a plane for the New York-to-Paris flight. I’d like to talk to you about the Bellanca, and I want to get me information about your engines. When would it be convenient for you to see me in Paterson?" "Did you say you're calling from St. Louis, Missouri?" the officer asks. "That's right." He's impressed, as I thought he'd be. My phone-call money is well spent.

It takes time, time you haven't got to give them when you're organizing a farm, breaking in new stock, and trying to get the ground prepared for crops in spring --- Twelve degrees right rudder. Now it's-mid-September. "Sixty-four I'm bid. Sixty-four I'm bid. Who'll make it sixty-five? Make it sixty-five! --- Fresh last month and going at sixty-four dollars! --- She's worth ninety if she's worth a cent --- going at sixty-four ---going at sixty four --- sold to Charles Lindbergh at sixty-four dollars!" The auctioneer points his stick at me and turns to the next animal. I'm buying cows for our milk herd. This roan is mixed as a mongrel dog. She's nothing to be proud of; but her udders are full and her veins are large. She'll run up our check from the creamery. The Western heifers Father bought won't help us much this winter. They're bred for beef, and only a few will even be worth milking.


pages: 616 words: 189,609

The Dream Machine: The Untold History of the Notorious V-22 Osprey by Richard Whittle

Ayatollah Khomeini, bank run, Charles Lindbergh, digital map, Donald Trump, helicopter parent, profit motive, Ronald Reagan, Rubik’s Cube

Burke Wilford, organized the meeting, which would prove a seminal event for what became the rotary wing aircraft industry. An engineer and manufacturer by profession, and a wealthy man, Wilford was another free-thinker and aviation entrepreneur who bubbled with enthusiasm for the idea of rotary wing aircraft. He had been drawn to aviation by a contest to develop safer aircraft in 1927, the year Charles Lindbergh became the first to fly across the Atlantic solo in his Spirit of St. Louis. Since then, Wilford had built a gyroplane, a machine similar to an Autogiro, based on a design he had bought during a visit to Germany in the 1920s. Now Germany’s Fw 61 helicopter was causing a sensation among the rotary wing crowd. The Fw 61 bore a strong resemblance to the future tiltrotor. It had the fuselage and tail of an airplane, but instead of wings, the craft had two big vertical rotors held out to the sides by outrigger pylons.

Lichten had seen it first, of course, but as Wernicke led Bell’s engineers in designing and building the XV-15, he became utterly convinced the tiltrotor was going to change the world. It just had to be, Wernicke thought. He was so sure of it, sometimes he’d look around and think, “Why build helicopters anymore? Why aren’t they all building tiltrotors?” When the XV-15 stole the Paris Air Show in 1981—on the very airfield where Charles Lindbergh had changed aviation history, and the world, by completing the first nonstop transatlantic flight in 1927—Wernicke thought that was the turning point. Now, he was sure, Bell would get a chance to build a real production tiltrotor, a chance to prove to the world that the tiltrotor really was the dream machine. Then the military had come up with the JVX and its ridiculous requirements, a straitjacket of constraints that had forced him to design an aircraft that just might make people think the tiltrotor was an idea whose time hadn’t come after all, and never would.


pages: 269 words: 74,955

The Crash Detectives: Investigating the World's Most Mysterious Air Disasters by Christine Negroni

Air France Flight 447, Airbus A320, Captain Sullenberger Hudson, Charles Lindbergh, Checklist Manifesto, computer age, crew resource management, crowdsourcing, low cost airline, low cost carrier, Richard Feynman, South China Sea, Tenerife airport disaster, Thomas Bayes, US Airways Flight 1549

The primary indicator of that is that the plane did not start to descend. Because of the seriousness of loss of pressurization in flight, the modern airliner has a belt-and-suspenders approach to the hazard. The oxygen mask is the belt, and emergency descent is the suspenders. They are equally important, two routes to the same destination: clearheadedness. In his book Of Flight and Life, Charles Lindbergh tells of testing an unpressurized fighter plane at thirty-six thousand feet in 1943 when his oxygen supply abruptly stopped. “I know from altitude-chamber experience that I have about 15 seconds of consciousness left at this altitude—neither time nor clearness of mind to check hoses and connections. Life demands oxygen and the only sure supply lies four miles beneath me,” he writes. As he recounts in the book, Lindbergh sent the airplane into a dive, rocketing toward earth as he passed out.


pages: 255 words: 76,834

Creative Selection: Inside Apple's Design Process During the Golden Age of Steve Jobs by Ken Kocienda

1960s counterculture, anti-pattern, Apple's 1984 Super Bowl advert, bash_history, Charles Lindbergh, conceptual framework, Donald Knuth, en.wikipedia.org, HyperCard, Kickstarter, Lao Tzu, premature optimization, profit motive, QWERTY keyboard, Richard Feynman, Richard Stallman, Robert X Cringely, Silicon Valley, Steve Ballmer, Steve Jobs, Steven Levy, zero-sum game

Elmer Ellsworth Burns, The Story of Great Inventions (New York: Harper & Brothers, 1910), pp. 121–124. 4. Steven Johnson, Where Good Ideas Come From: The Natural History of Innovation (New York: Riverhead Books, 2010). 5. Paul Israel, Edison: A Life of Invention (New York: John Wiley & Sons, 1998). Of particular interest is the text on pages 168, 188, and 217. 6. James Newton, Uncommon Friends: Life with Thomas Edison, Henry Ford, Harvey Firestone, Alexis Carrel & Charles Lindbergh (New York : Harcourt, 1987), p. 24. Apparently, the author, James Newton, was on the scene when Edison made this statement about inspiration and perspiration. However, the quotation I cite is part of a lengthy back-and-forth with a reporter who was questioning Edison on the occasion of his birthday in 1929, and I doubt the author had a notebook to take down what Edison said. So, did Edison really talk about his working method exactly as we say that he did?


pages: 589 words: 197,971

A Fiery Peace in a Cold War: Bernard Schriever and the Ultimate Weapon by Neil Sheehan

Albert Einstein, anti-communist, Berlin Wall, Bretton Woods, British Empire, Charles Lindbergh, cuban missile crisis, double helix, European colonialism, John von Neumann, Menlo Park, Mikhail Gorbachev, mutually assured destruction, Norman Macrae, nuclear winter, operation paperclip, RAND corporation, Ronald Reagan, undersea cable, uranium enrichment

Bennie had not yet even officially taken charge of the fledgling Western Development Division, something he would not do for nearly another two weeks, until August 2, when he issued General Orders No. 1, formally assuming command. And so on this opening morning of the meeting he stood on the step before the altar rail, where the students had knelt to receive the Communion wafer, and updated his prestigious audience on what had transpired since the formation of the new committee by Gardner and its initial meeting in Washington in April. Johnny von Neumann, Kistiakowsky, Wiesner, Norris Bradbury, and Charles Lindbergh sat on the pews in front of him with the other members new and old. Running down the walls on both sides of the chapel were windows of stained glass with portraits of saints and depictions of religious scenes. These were subsequently covered with plasterboard when the pews were ripped out and replaced by seats. The altar was also removed and a small briefing stage erected in its place. Technically, the plasterboard was nailed over the windows for security reasons, but some of Bennie’s subordinates also found themselves uncomfortable devising a weapon of such terrible proportions amidst the stained-glass reminders that this had once been a holy place.

The senator flew out to California for briefings by Bennie and his team at the Schoolhouse in Inglewood and then by McNarney and Lanphier and their Atlas team at Convair headquarters in San Diego. After his return to Washington, Symington indicated he was going to start making trouble over the way the ICBM program was being handled. Schriever and Gardner took the initiative and confronted him together in order, as Bennie put it in his diary, to “lay cards on table with Symington.” Charles Lindbergh also intervened, persuading Talbott to call the senator. The counterattack seems to have been effective. Symington apparently decided he did not want to get involved. He did nothing. At the end of November, McNarney and Lanphier convened a meeting in San Diego to present what they apparently regarded as a compromise. Gardner flew out from Washington to attend, joined by Lindbergh on behalf of the Von Neumann Committee.


pages: 324 words: 86,056

The Socialist Manifesto: The Case for Radical Politics in an Era of Extreme Inequality by Bhaskar Sunkara

Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, agricultural Revolution, Bernie Sanders, British Empire, business climate, business cycle, capital controls, centre right, Charles Lindbergh, collective bargaining, Deng Xiaoping, deskilling, Donald Trump, equal pay for equal work, feminist movement, Ferguson, Missouri, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, full employment, gig economy, Gunnar Myrdal, happiness index / gross national happiness, Honoré de Balzac, income inequality, inventory management, labor-force participation, land reform, land value tax, Mark Zuckerberg, means of production, Mikhail Gorbachev, Neil Kinnock, new economy, Occupy movement, postindustrial economy, precariat, race to the bottom, Ralph Waldo Emerson, self-driving car, Silicon Valley, single-payer health, telemarketer, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, too big to fail, union organizing, Upton Sinclair, urban renewal, We are the 99%

The Communists had recovered from the events of 1927 and had beaten back several nationalist offensives; they now ruled a territory of three million people that was larger in area than France. But the Kuomintang forces were still superior. They were reinforced by foreign support. American and British loans to the KMT allowed them to pay for US-built airplanes, and they also benefited from the services of military advisors, including Charles Lindbergh and hundreds of Wehrmacht officers, who formulated a strategy to slowly strangle the CPC positions. In response, Mao continued to advocate hit-and-run attacks and guerrilla warfare, while his future deputy Zhou Enlai favored “protracted warfare” with mass formations. The Communists had their own German military advisor in Comintern agent Otto Braun. He largely agreed with Zhou and won support for a series of doomed attacks against the nationalist army.16 The details of the desperate struggle in Jiangxi and Fujian is beyond the scope of this book, but the fact that military and not political questions dominated during this period tells us much about what the CPC had become.


pages: 340 words: 81,110

How Democracies Die by Steven Levitsky, Daniel Ziblatt

Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Ayatollah Khomeini, basic income, Berlin Wall, Bernie Sanders, Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty, Cass Sunstein, centre right, Charles Lindbergh, clean water, David Brooks, Donald Trump, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Gunnar Myrdal, illegal immigration, immigration reform, income inequality, Jeff Bezos, Nate Silver, Norman Mailer, old-boy network, Robert Gordon, Ronald Reagan, single-payer health, The Rise and Fall of American Growth, universal basic income

Both Democrats and Republicans have confronted extremist figures on their fringes, some of whom enjoyed considerable public support. For decades, both parties succeeded in keeping these figures out of the mainstream. Until, of course, 2016. 2 Gatekeeping in America In The Plot Against America, American novelist Philip Roth builds on real historical events to imagine what fascism might have looked like in prewar America. An early American mass-media hero, Charles Lindbergh, is the novel’s central figure: He skyrockets to fame with his 1927 solo flight across the Atlantic and later becomes a vocal isolationist and Nazi sympathizer. But here is where history takes a fantastic turn in Roth’s hands: Rather than fading into obscurity, Lindbergh arrives by plane at the 1940 Republican Party convention in Philadelphia at 3:14 A.M., as a packed hall finds itself deadlocked on the twentieth ballot.


pages: 296 words: 78,112

Devil's Bargain: Steve Bannon, Donald Trump, and the Storming of the Presidency by Joshua Green

4chan, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Ayatollah Khomeini, Bernie Sanders, business climate, centre right, Charles Lindbergh, coherent worldview, collateralized debt obligation, conceptual framework, corporate raider, crony capitalism, currency manipulation / currency intervention, Donald Trump, Fractional reserve banking, Goldman Sachs: Vampire Squid, Gordon Gekko, guest worker program, illegal immigration, immigration reform, liberation theology, low skilled workers, Nate Silver, Nelson Mandela, nuclear winter, obamacare, Peace of Westphalia, Peter Thiel, quantitative hedge fund, Renaissance Technologies, Robert Mercer, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, social intelligence, speech recognition, urban planning

“My views are what everybody else’s views are. When I give speeches, sometimes I’ll sign autographs and I’ll get to talk to people and learn a lot about the party.” The problem, he’d concluded, was lousy marketing. Having absorbed the shortcomings of the Republican message, Trump had developed a better one: “America first.” He waved off complaints that the slogan was redolent of the anti-Semitism of Charles Lindbergh’s America First Committee during World War II. “I don’t care,” he said. “When you look at the voters, you see they want hope. There’s no hope. No hope. We’re taking care of everybody else. I’m for making America first.” Under Trump, things would be different. “Five, ten years from now—different party,” he said. “You’re going to have a worker’s party.” Trump thought the scale of his victory proved the strength of his proposals.


pages: 308 words: 87,238

Apollo 11: The Inside Story by David Whitehouse

Albert Einstein, Berlin Wall, Charles Lindbergh, low earth orbit, operation paperclip

In his biography Armstrong said, ‘In my mind the important thing was that we got four aluminium legs safely down on the surface of the moon while we were still inside the craft. But it could technically have been Buzz. Just move before you put the backpacks on.’ Later Chris Kraft explained NASA’s thinking. He said that they knew damn well that the first guy on the Moon was going to be a modern-day Charles Lindbergh (the pioneering intercontinental aviator). Neil was calm, quiet and had absolute confidence. We knew he was the Lindbergh type. He had no ego. The most he ever said about walking on the Moon was that it might have been that he wanted to be the first test pilot to walk upon the Moon. If you would have said to him, you are going to be the most famous human being on Earth for the rest of your life, he would have answered that he didn’t want to be the first man on the Moon.


pages: 308 words: 84,713

The Glass Cage: Automation and Us by Nicholas Carr

Airbnb, Airbus A320, Andy Kessler, Atul Gawande, autonomous vehicles, Bernard Ziegler, business process, call centre, Captain Sullenberger Hudson, Charles Lindbergh, Checklist Manifesto, cloud computing, computerized trading, David Brooks, deliberate practice, deskilling, digital map, Douglas Engelbart, drone strike, Elon Musk, Erik Brynjolfsson, Flash crash, Frank Gehry, Frank Levy and Richard Murnane: The New Division of Labor, Frederick Winslow Taylor, future of work, global supply chain, Google Glasses, Google Hangouts, High speed trading, indoor plumbing, industrial robot, Internet of things, Jacquard loom, James Watt: steam engine, job automation, John Maynard Keynes: Economic Possibilities for our Grandchildren, John Maynard Keynes: technological unemployment, Kevin Kelly, knowledge worker, Lyft, Marc Andreessen, Mark Zuckerberg, means of production, natural language processing, new economy, Nicholas Carr, Norbert Wiener, Oculus Rift, pattern recognition, Peter Thiel, place-making, plutocrats, Plutocrats, profit motive, Ralph Waldo Emerson, RAND corporation, randomized controlled trial, Ray Kurzweil, recommendation engine, robot derives from the Czech word robota Czech, meaning slave, Second Machine Age, self-driving car, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley ideology, software is eating the world, Stephen Hawking, Steve Jobs, TaskRabbit, technoutopianism, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, turn-by-turn navigation, US Airways Flight 1549, Watson beat the top human players on Jeopardy!, William Langewiesche

As we become more expert in the use of a tool, our sense of responsibility for it naturally strengthens. To the novice mower, a scythe may feel like a foreign object in the hands; to the accomplished mower, hands and scythe become one thing. Talent tightens the bond between an instrument and its user. This feeling of physical and ethical entanglement doesn’t have to go away as technologies become more complex. In reporting on his historic solo flight across the Atlantic in 1927, Charles Lindbergh spoke of his plane and himself as if they were a single being: “We have made this flight across the ocean, not I or it.”24 The airplane was a complicated system encompassing many components, but to a skilled pilot it still had the intimate quality of a hand tool. The love that lays the swale in rows is also the love that parts the clouds for the stick-and-rudder man. Automation weakens the bond between tool and user not because computer-controlled systems are complex but because they ask so little of us.


pages: 801 words: 209,348

Americana: A 400-Year History of American Capitalism by Bhu Srinivasan

activist fund / activist shareholder / activist investor, American ideology, Apple II, Apple's 1984 Super Bowl advert, bank run, barriers to entry, Berlin Wall, blue-collar work, Bob Noyce, Bonfire of the Vanities, British Empire, business cycle, buy and hold, California gold rush, Charles Lindbergh, collective bargaining, commoditize, corporate raider, cuban missile crisis, Deng Xiaoping, diversification, diversified portfolio, Douglas Engelbart, financial innovation, fixed income, Ford paid five dollars a day, global supply chain, Gordon Gekko, Haight Ashbury, hypertext link, income inequality, invisible hand, James Watt: steam engine, Jane Jacobs, Jeff Bezos, John Markoff, joint-stock company, joint-stock limited liability company, Kickstarter, laissez-faire capitalism, Louis Pasteur, Marc Andreessen, Menlo Park, mortgage debt, mutually assured destruction, Norman Mailer, oil rush, peer-to-peer, pets.com, popular electronics, profit motive, race to the bottom, refrigerator car, risk/return, Ronald Reagan, Sand Hill Road, self-driving car, shareholder value, side project, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, Steve Ballmer, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, strikebreaker, Ted Nelson, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, the new new thing, The Predators' Ball, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, trade route, transcontinental railway, traveling salesman, Upton Sinclair, Vannevar Bush, Works Progress Administration, zero-sum game

Entering 1929, there were nearly 26 million registered vehicles on the road, nearly one for every five Americans, with millions of small trucks supplementing railroad commerce. The twenty million electrified American homes had new appliances such as washing machines and vacuum cleaners. The war efforts had made way for the rise of commercial aviation, with thousands of small aircraft operating scheduled service. And Americans continued to push the boundaries of their own breakthroughs: Charles Lindbergh crossed the Atlantic and became an international hero. American ingenuity was even putting radio into cars. Despite the loss of alcohol taxes due to Prohibition, the income tax had led to years of postwar budget surpluses. During the eight years of Republican presidencies under Warren Harding and Coolidge, the country had paid down vast amounts of debt incurred during the war. It exported far more than it imported, resulting in substantial trade surpluses.

This made perfect sense considering that America’s two most formidable defensive assets didn’t cost anything to maintain. As long as the Atlantic and Pacific oceans remained vast and filled with water, America was going to be tough to invade. This conception of warfare left America with old ships, old guns, old planes, and a small standing army. In the late thirties, to one American living in England, the fate of Europe seemed sealed. Charles Lindbergh had done more than any living person to shorten the time and space separating Europe from North America. His 1927 crossing of the Atlantic Ocean had made him an American hero and international sensation, with President Coolidge dispatching a warship to retrieve both Lindbergh and his plane. But celebrity had crushed Lindbergh. In America, faced with his reluctant country-boy shyness, the press had hounded him for pictures and sound bites, something and anything for an adoring American public.


pages: 384 words: 89,250

Made to Break: Technology and Obsolescence in America by Giles Slade

Albert Einstein, Alexey Pajitnov wrote Tetris, American ideology, Apple's 1984 Super Bowl advert, Buckminster Fuller, business cycle, Cass Sunstein, Charles Lindbergh, creative destruction, Douglas Engelbart, Douglas Engelbart, global village, housing crisis, indoor plumbing, invention of radio, Joseph Schumpeter, Marshall McLuhan, Mikhail Gorbachev, more computing power than Apollo, mutually assured destruction, Ralph Nader, rent control, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, Steve Jobs, the market place, the medium is the message, Thorstein Veblen, unemployed young men, upwardly mobile, Vladimir Vetrov: Farewell Dossier, white picket fence, women in the workforce

When it is 1 year, we will have a perfect score.”22 In the spring of 1927, after the fif een-millionth car rolled off the line, Ford Motor Company shut down production of the Model T forever, in order to retool for the Model A. Since Alfred Sloan was not yet a household name, the New York Times described what was happening as “the fi ht for the national automobile championship between Henry Ford and General Motors.”23 When Ford’s new car was revealed on November 30 of that year, the American press swooped down on Dearborn, Michigan, to watch Charles Lindbergh, the nation’s most recent hero, demonstrate the Model A’s modern features. Publicity photographs of the event depict a youthful, clear-eyed Lindbergh sitting tall behind the wheel of the new Ford Tudor with an elegant older woman smiling graciously beside him. She is Gertrude Ederle, Queen of Romania. With the joint endorsement of American and European royalty, the Model A became an overnight success.


pages: 259 words: 94,135

Spacewalker: My Journey in Space and Faith as NASA's Record-Setting Frequent Flyer by Jerry Lynn Ross, John Norberg

Charles Lindbergh, glass ceiling, low earth orbit, orbital mechanics / astrodynamics, Ronald Reagan, Saturday Night Live

On May 5,1961,NASA launched the first American,Alan Shepard, into space. At school we all gathered around a little black-and-white TV to watch. We cheered him on as his rocket lifted off the launch pad. He went up and came down. It was all over in fifteen minutes. Al was born in 1923, just five years after the end of World War I. He was born only twenty years after the Wright brothers flew at Kitty Hawk and four years before Charles Lindbergh flew solo across the Atlantic Ocean. This man, who was born in the shadows of the first days of flight, became not only the first American in space, but also the fifth person to walk on the Moon. I would meet this space icon several times in my life, always in group settings. He spoke to our astronaut class, and I saw him at astronaut reunions. Al was trim and athletic-looking. He had a quick mind and alert, piercing eyes.


pages: 339 words: 88,732

The Second Machine Age: Work, Progress, and Prosperity in a Time of Brilliant Technologies by Erik Brynjolfsson, Andrew McAfee

"Robert Solow", 2013 Report for America's Infrastructure - American Society of Civil Engineers - 19 March 2013, 3D printing, access to a mobile phone, additive manufacturing, Airbnb, Albert Einstein, Amazon Mechanical Turk, Amazon Web Services, American Society of Civil Engineers: Report Card, Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic, autonomous vehicles, barriers to entry, basic income, Baxter: Rethink Robotics, British Empire, business cycle, business intelligence, business process, call centre, Charles Lindbergh, Chuck Templeton: OpenTable:, clean water, combinatorial explosion, computer age, computer vision, congestion charging, corporate governance, creative destruction, crowdsourcing, David Ricardo: comparative advantage, digital map, employer provided health coverage, en.wikipedia.org, Erik Brynjolfsson, factory automation, falling living standards, Filter Bubble, first square of the chessboard / second half of the chessboard, Frank Levy and Richard Murnane: The New Division of Labor, Freestyle chess, full employment, G4S, game design, global village, happiness index / gross national happiness, illegal immigration, immigration reform, income inequality, income per capita, indoor plumbing, industrial robot, informal economy, intangible asset, inventory management, James Watt: steam engine, Jeff Bezos, jimmy wales, job automation, John Markoff, John Maynard Keynes: Economic Possibilities for our Grandchildren, John Maynard Keynes: technological unemployment, Joseph Schumpeter, Kevin Kelly, Khan Academy, knowledge worker, Kodak vs Instagram, law of one price, low skilled workers, Lyft, Mahatma Gandhi, manufacturing employment, Marc Andreessen, Mark Zuckerberg, Mars Rover, mass immigration, means of production, Narrative Science, Nate Silver, natural language processing, Network effects, new economy, New Urbanism, Nicholas Carr, Occupy movement, oil shale / tar sands, oil shock, pattern recognition, Paul Samuelson, payday loans, post-work, price stability, Productivity paradox, profit maximization, Ralph Nader, Ray Kurzweil, recommendation engine, Report Card for America’s Infrastructure, Robert Gordon, Rodney Brooks, Ronald Reagan, Second Machine Age, self-driving car, sharing economy, Silicon Valley, Simon Kuznets, six sigma, Skype, software patent, sovereign wealth fund, speech recognition, statistical model, Steve Jobs, Steven Pinker, Stuxnet, supply-chain management, TaskRabbit, technological singularity, telepresence, The Bell Curve by Richard Herrnstein and Charles Murray, The Signal and the Noise by Nate Silver, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, total factor productivity, transaction costs, Tyler Cowen: Great Stagnation, Vernor Vinge, Watson beat the top human players on Jeopardy!, winner-take-all economy, Y2K

While latitude was relatively easy to calculate, longitude was a bigger problem, especially during long ocean voyages. A series of prizes totaling over one hundred thousand British pounds motivated major advances throughout the 1700s in the measurement of longitude. In 1919, the twenty-five-thousand-dollar Orteig Prize for a nonstop transatlantic flight motivated a series of aviation innovations, culminating in Charles Lindbergh’s successful flight in 1927. “Work saves a man from three great evils: boredom, vice, and need.” —Voltaire THE RECOMMENDATIONS WE MADE in the previous chapter will help boost the bounty and reduce or reverse the spread. But as we move deeper into the second machine age and the second half of the chessboard, will the Econ 101 playbook be enough to maintain healthy wage and job prospects?


pages: 316 words: 90,165

You Are Here: From the Compass to GPS, the History and Future of How We Find Ourselves by Hiawatha Bray

A Declaration of the Independence of Cyberspace, Albert Einstein, Big bang: deregulation of the City of London, bitcoin, British Empire, call centre, Charles Lindbergh, crowdsourcing, Dava Sobel, digital map, don't be evil, Edmond Halley, Edward Snowden, Firefox, game design, Google Earth, Hedy Lamarr / George Antheil, Isaac Newton, job automation, John Harrison: Longitude, John Snow's cholera map, license plate recognition, lone genius, openstreetmap, polynesian navigation, popular electronics, RAND corporation, RFID, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, Steve Jobs, Steven Levy, Thales of Miletus, trade route, turn-by-turn navigation, uranium enrichment, urban planning, Zipcar

In May 1983 a private jet owned by defense contractor Rockwell International flew from Cedar Rapids, Iowa, to Paris, becoming the first airplane to navigate across the Atlantic guided solely by GPS. The incomplete GPS network provided only limited coverage, so the aircraft landed in Vermont, Newfoundland, Iceland, and the United Kingdom when the satellites passed out of range. As a result, the trip took four days. But when the Sabreliner jet parked at Le Bourget airport—the same field where Charles Lindbergh had set down after flying the Atlantic alone in 1927—its nosewheel rested within twenty feet of its intended parking space.19 It is notable that this first Atlantic crossing was made by a private jet. Even though GPS was a military program, it had always been intended for civilian use. “Contrary to some versions of GPS history, from the very beginning, GPS was configured to be a dual-use system,” wrote codevelopers Bradford Parkinson and Stephen Powers.20 Some lost sight of this fact in the aftermath of a Cold War tragedy.


pages: 313 words: 95,077

Here Comes Everybody: The Power of Organizing Without Organizations by Clay Shirky

Andrew Keen, Berlin Wall, bioinformatics, Brewster Kahle, c2.com, Charles Lindbergh, crowdsourcing, en.wikipedia.org, hiring and firing, hive mind, Howard Rheingold, Internet Archive, invention of agriculture, invention of movable type, invention of the printing press, invention of the telegraph, jimmy wales, Joi Ito, Kuiper Belt, liberation theology, Mahatma Gandhi, means of production, Merlin Mann, Metcalfe’s law, Nash equilibrium, Network effects, Nicholas Carr, Picturephone, place-making, Pluto: dwarf planet, prediction markets, price mechanism, prisoner's dilemma, profit motive, Richard Stallman, Robert Metcalfe, Ronald Coase, Silicon Valley, slashdot, social software, Stewart Brand, supply-chain management, The Nature of the Firm, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, The Wisdom of Crowds, transaction costs, ultimatum game, Vilfredo Pareto, Yogi Berra

Weblogs won’t destroy the one-way mirror of fame, and “interactive TV” is an oxymoron, because gathering an audience at TV scale defeats anything more interactive than voting for someone on American Idol. The surprise held out by social tools like weblogs is that scale alone, even in a medium that allows for two-way connections, is enough to create and sustain the imbalance of fame. The mere technological possibility of reply isn’t enough to overcome the human limits on attention. Charles Lindbergh couldn’t bear to let anyone else answer his fan mail, promising himself he would get around to it eventually (which, of course, he never did). Egalitarianism is possible only in small social systems. Once a medium gets past a certain size, fame is a forced move. Early reports of the death of traditional media portrayed the Web as a kind of anti-TV—two-way where TV is one-way, interactive where TV is passive, and (implicitly) good where TV is bad.


pages: 386 words: 92,778

"Live From Cape Canaveral": Covering the Space Race, From Sputnik to Today by Jay Barbree

Charles Lindbergh, dark matter, gravity well, invisible hand, Mikhail Gorbachev, Ronald Reagan, Stephen Hawking, white flight

(NASA). “What’s this?” he muttered to himself, reaching for the switch to override his automatics and deploy the drogue chute early. He was at 55,000 feet and stabilization was important. From that point on, Friendship Seven had a perfect splashdown. The first American to orbit Earth dropped into the water near his recovery ship, Noa. John Glenn arrived in the nation’s capital a hero of Charles Lindbergh’s stature. He had lassoed the Russian lead, and the White House gave him a parade. A quarter of a million people braved heavy rain to watch the astronaut pass. He was then jetted off to New York City, where four million screaming, cheering people greeted him with a tumultuous ovation and a ticker-tape parade. When John Glenn had satisfied all his national appearances, he came home for a parade through Cocoa Beach and a first-hand inspection by President John F.


pages: 325 words: 99,983

Globish: How the English Language Became the World's Language by Robert McCrum

Alistair Cooke, anti-communist, Berlin Wall, British Empire, call centre, Charles Lindbergh, colonial rule, credit crunch, cuban missile crisis, Deng Xiaoping, Etonian, failed state, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, invention of movable type, invention of writing, invisible hand, Isaac Newton, jimmy wales, knowledge economy, Livingstone, I presume, Martin Wolf, Naomi Klein, Norman Mailer, Parag Khanna, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Republic of Letters, Ronald Reagan, sceptred isle, Scramble for Africa, Silicon Valley, Steven Pinker, the new new thing, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thomas L Friedman, trade route, transatlantic slave trade, transcontinental railway, upwardly mobile

These new Hollywood movie legends – men like John Wayne and Errol Flynn – would speak in American English, and inspire a new fascination with a language and a culture that, in the final decades of British imperialism, was sometimes as much a source of hostility as admiration. Fittingly, the great American superstar of this new interconnected world was the first man to fly the Atlantic single-handed, Charles Lindbergh. Now that the Atlantic could be shrunk to ever-shorter aeroplane journeys, Great Britain and the United States would move closer together in culture and language. This American century is the essential precursor to the Globish millennium. It was a two-stage process. First, there was the worldwide development of a common print culture, in which American language and cultural values became widely available.


pages: 469 words: 97,582

QI: The Second Book of General Ignorance by Lloyd, John, Mitchinson, John

Ada Lovelace, Boris Johnson, British Empire, Buckminster Fuller, Captain Sullenberger Hudson, Charles Lindbergh, clean water, double helix, Etonian, George Santayana, ghettoisation, Isaac Newton, Lao Tzu, Louis Pasteur, Mikhail Gorbachev, Murano, Venice glass, out of africa, the built environment, trade route, transatlantic slave trade, traveling salesman, US Airways Flight 1549

When the US government recently attempted to buy the freehold of the Grosvenor Square site from their landlord, the Duke of Westminster, he said that he would let them have it if the Americans returned to him the State of Virginia, confiscated from his ancestors during the War of Independence. Which was the first film to star Mickey Mouse? It wasn’t Steamboat Willie, released on 18 November 1928 – even though the Walt Disney Company still celebrates this date as Mickey’s official birthday. There were two Mickey Mouse cartoons made earlier that year. The first was Plane Crazy. In it, Mickey tries to emulate the American aviator Charles Lindbergh (1902–74) by building a plane. He spends much of his first flight trying to force a kiss on Minnie Mouse, eventually causing the plane to crash-land. The second, The Gallopin’ Gaucho, was a topical parody of The Gaucho (1927), starring matinée idol Douglas Fairbanks Junior (1909– 2000). The film was set in a bar in the Argentine pampas, where Mickey smokes, drinks, dances a tango and fights the evil outlaw Black Pete to win the affections of the saucy barmaid, Minnie.


pages: 319 words: 100,984

The Moon: A History for the Future by Oliver Morton

Charles Lindbergh, commoditize, Dava Sobel, Donald Trump, Elon Musk, facts on the ground, gravity well, Isaac Newton, Jeff Bezos, Johannes Kepler, low earth orbit, Mark Zuckerberg, Menlo Park, multiplanetary species, Norman Mailer, Pierre-Simon Laplace, planetary scale, Pluto: dwarf planet, plutocrats, Plutocrats, Silicon Valley, South China Sea, Steve Jobs, Stewart Brand, UNCLOS, Whole Earth Catalog, X Prize

Oberth looked at me with the smile which old-fashioned pedagogues reserve for people whom they call “my dear young friend” and said after a while: “There will be need for rockets which carry a thousand pounds of dynamite.” And this was, indeed, the killer app. Goddard’s project was not obviously military; he attracted money from various sources, including the Smithsonian Institution and the Guggenheim family. Goddard was introduced to the Guggenheims by Charles Lindbergh, the aviator and fascist sympathiser who had become fascinated by talk of a rocket that could reach the Moon.1 But during the 1930s the armed forces were his biggest sponsor. At the same time, with the rise of the Nazi Party, the VfR saw many of its leading lights transfer themselves to the Wehrmacht. Rocketry, which had hardly contributed at all to the carnage of the First World War, was of such little account that the Treaty of Versailles had neglected to forbid or even mention it, meaning it was an area of weapons development where Germany was unconstrained.


Falter: Has the Human Game Begun to Play Itself Out? by Bill McKibben

23andMe, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Airbnb, American Legislative Exchange Council, Anne Wojcicki, artificial general intelligence, Bernie Sanders, Bill Joy: nanobots, Burning Man, call centre, carbon footprint, Charles Lindbergh, clean water, Colonization of Mars, computer vision, David Attenborough, Donald Trump, double helix, Edward Snowden, Elon Musk, ending welfare as we know it, energy transition, Flynn Effect, Google Earth, Hyperloop, impulse control, income inequality, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Jane Jacobs, Jaron Lanier, Jeff Bezos, job automation, life extension, light touch regulation, Mark Zuckerberg, mass immigration, megacity, Menlo Park, moral hazard, Naomi Klein, Nelson Mandela, obamacare, off grid, oil shale / tar sands, pattern recognition, Peter Thiel, plutocrats, Plutocrats, profit motive, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Ray Kurzweil, Robert Mercer, Ronald Reagan, Sam Altman, self-driving car, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, smart meter, Snapchat, stem cell, Stephen Hawking, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Steven Pinker, strong AI, supervolcano, technoutopianism, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, traffic fines, Travis Kalanick, urban sprawl, Watson beat the top human players on Jeopardy!, Y Combinator, Y2K, yield curve

Using that plant as a rough yardstick, Solomon calculates that America needs 295 solar factories of a similar size to defeat climate change (roughly six per state), plus a similar effort for wind turbines. We’ve mobilized at this scale once before, and it was the last time we faced what seemed like an existential enemy. After the attack on Pearl Harbor, the world’s largest industrial plant under a single roof went up in six months, near Ypsilanti, Michigan; Charles Lindbergh called it the “Grand Canyon of the mechanized world.” Within months, it was churning out a B-24 Liberator bomber every hour. Bombers! Huge, complicated planes, endlessly more intricate than solar panels or turbine blades—each one 1,225,000 parts, with 313,237 rivets. Nearby, in Warren, Michigan, the U.S. Army built a tank factory faster than it could build the power plant to run it—so it simply towed a steam locomotive into one end of the building to provide steam heat and electricity.


pages: 300 words: 99,432

Godforsaken Sea by Derek Lundy

British Empire, Charles Lindbergh, Parkinson's law, the scientific method, William Langewiesche, Winter of Discontent

“It’s a dreadful, brutal disappointment, but it won’t do any good to cry over it,” she said briskly. She would rejoin the race after her boat had been repaired, “not to win, but as a way of being faithful to my commitments. The Vendée Globe is a hard race. No one can say they’re sure of finishing. But for me, in my mind, the race will go on until I get back to Les Sables-d’Olonne.” IN MAY 1932, Amelia Earhart flew solo across the Atlantic Ocean, the first person to do so since Charles Lindbergh five years earlier and, needless to say, the first woman to make the flight alone. (She had been a passenger on a plane that made the crossing in 1928.) She took off from Harbour Grace, Newfoundland, in her red single-engine Lockheed Vega and flew into bad weather almost right away. For most of the fourteen-hour-long flight, she was socked-in, flying blind. A few hours after takeoff, her altimeter failed.


pages: 328 words: 96,141

Rocket Billionaires: Elon Musk, Jeff Bezos, and the New Space Race by Tim Fernholz

Amazon Web Services, autonomous vehicles, business climate, Charles Lindbergh, Clayton Christensen, cloud computing, Colonization of Mars, corporate governance, corporate social responsibility, disruptive innovation, Donald Trump, Elon Musk, high net worth, Iridium satellite, Jeff Bezos, Kickstarter, low earth orbit, Marc Andreessen, Mark Zuckerberg, minimum viable product, multiplanetary species, mutually assured destruction, new economy, nuclear paranoia, paypal mafia, Peter H. Diamandis: Planetary Resources, Peter Thiel, pets.com, planetary scale, private space industry, profit maximization, RAND corporation, Richard Feynman, Richard Feynman: Challenger O-ring, Ronald Reagan, shareholder value, Silicon Valley, skunkworks, sovereign wealth fund, Stephen Hawking, Steve Jobs, trade route, undersea cable, We wanted flying cars, instead we got 140 characters, X Prize, Y2K

And in 2004, he saw opportunity in flying humans to the stars above. At the time, there existed only one privately funded, flight-proven vehicle that could take humans up to space. It was called SpaceShipOne, and in 2004 it won the Ansari X Prize by flying a human out of the atmosphere twice in two weeks. The prize had been created in the spirit of the great aviation challenges of the 1930s. Just as Charles Lindbergh flew across the Atlantic, spurred by a big cash prize, before paying passengers existed, so, too, did the donors behind this prize hope to goose space commerce. To fund the prize, the prize’s organizer, Peter Diamandis, called on the Ansaris, a wealthy Iranian family that had fled to the United States during the revolution. In the early nineties, Anousheh Ansari, then an employee of MCI, convinced her husband and brother-in-law to start a new company called Telecom Technologies Inc., which provided software to manage the growth of digital networks.


pages: 415 words: 103,801

The Last Kings of Shanghai: The Rival Jewish Dynasties That Helped Create Modern China by Jonathan Kaufman

anti-communist, Berlin Wall, British Empire, Charles Lindbergh, colonial rule, Deng Xiaoping, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Honoré de Balzac, indoor plumbing, joint-stock company, life extension, Mahatma Gandhi, Mark Zuckerberg, Mikhail Gorbachev, old-boy network, plutocrats, Plutocrats, rent control, Steve Jobs, trade route

It didn’t stop the Kadoories from filling Marble Hall with Chinese antiques, Persian carpets, even a whole ceiling imported from an Indian temple. Marble Hall became the most famous address in Shanghai. Unlike the parties at the stuffy Shanghai British Club and other British residences that were staid and predictable, those at Marble Hall burst with the energy of the Jazz Age that was sweeping the United States and Europe. The home linked Shanghai to London, but also to Paris and New York. The Kadoories hosted Charles Lindbergh at a party when he was flying around the world, then welcomed Katherine Stinson as the first woman to fly to Shanghai from England. A group of American pilots flying around the world landed one day at four in the afternoon. A film was made of the landing and shown in the ballroom of Marble Hall at nine the same night. Marble Hall parties featured a “bevy of pretty girls” who greeted guests at the door and ushered them into the ballroom and gardens to see “solos, dancers, musical numbers, clever variety turns, some smart dresses and a few stunts not seen before in Shanghai,” Shanghai’s English-language newspaper reported.


Fodor's Hawaii 2012 by Fodor's Travel Publications

big-box store, carbon footprint, Charles Lindbergh, global village, Maui Hawaii, new economy, out of africa, place-making, polynesian navigation, urban sprawl

The place gets crowded, though, because most people who drive the Hāna Highway make this their last stop. If you enjoy hiking, go up the stream on the 2-mi hike to Waimoku Falls. The trail crosses a spectacular gorge, then turns into a boardwalk that takes you through an amazing bamboo forest. You can pitch a tent in the grassy campground down by the sea. Grave of Charles Lindbergh. Many people travel the mile past ‘Ohe‘o Gulch to see the Grave of Charles Lindbergh. The world-renowned aviator chose to be buried here because he and his wife, writer Anne Morrow Lindbergh, spent a lot of time living in the area in a home they’d built. He was buried here in 1974, next to Palapala Ho‘omau Congregational Church. The simple one-room church sits on a bluff over the sea, with the small graveyard on the ocean side.


pages: 816 words: 242,405

A Man on the Moon by Andrew Chaikin

Charles Lindbergh, cuban missile crisis, data acquisition, gravity well, index card, Internet Archive, invention of the telephone, Isaac Newton, Norman Mailer, orbital mechanics / astrodynamics

He was a member of the second astronaut group—or the New 9, as they were dubbed by Life magazine—and they were key players in the Apollo effort. But to the world, the only real astronauts were the Original 7. One of Conrad's first assignments was to accompany John Glenn on visits to Apollo contractors around the country. Glenn was likable enough, and Conrad could see that as the first American to orbit the earth he had risen to a hero status no pilot had attained since Charles Lindbergh. At every airport an excited crowd would quickly surround Glenn, asking for autographs, and Glenn would smile and put down his bag and oblige them. In order to keep moving, Conrad ended up carrying Glenn's bags as well as his own. A few weeks of this were enough to shatter any illusions Conrad may have had about his status as one of the nation's astronauts. In fact, Pete Conrad was the last person anybody would think to ask for an autograph.

They reviewed the flight plan, and received briefings on the readiness of their spacecraft and Saturn booster. And above all, there were the daily sessions in the simulator; at times, Apollo 8 seemed to be an exercise in switches and valves and maneuvers, not the first flight away from the earth. But on December 20, the day before launch, Borman’s crew had a visitor who brought home the historic impact of what they were about to attempt. Charles Lindbergh, one of the most enigmatic figures of the twentieth century, emerged from his retreat to visit Borman, Lovell, and Anders in the crew quarters. Forty-one years after flying solo across the Atlantic, Lindbergh appeared tall, tanned, and surprisingly fit for his sixty-six years. Accompanied by his wife, Anne, herself an accomplished pilot and author, Lindbergh arrived to have lunch with three fellow fliers about to navigate an ocean far more vast and untraveled.


pages: 366 words: 109,117

Higher: A Historic Race to the Sky and the Making of a City by Neal Bascomb

buttonwood tree, California gold rush, Charles Lindbergh, Everybody Ought to Be Rich, hiring and firing, margin call, market bubble, Ralph Waldo Emerson, transcontinental railway, Works Progress Administration

Scott Fitzgerald, the poster boy for the decade to come, gave words to what everyone felt: “A fresh picture of life in America began to form before my eyes—America was going on the greatest, gaudiest spree in history and there was going to be plenty to tell about it. The golden boom was in the air.” While Europe was forced to tend its wounds, America accelerated at a dizzying pace into the 1920s. The decade saw the first pilot to cross the Atlantic in a solo flight and declare in France, “I am Charles Lindbergh.” It saw the spread of mass production, mass marketing, and mass consumption. It brought us flappers, short skirts, the Harlem Renaissance, a woman’s right to vote, the martini, celebrity scandals, the cult of youth, talkies, mobsters, the great Babe Ruth, speakeasies, 104 words for “intoxicated,” Dorothy Parker’s Round Table, the fast-step, and lots of cigarettes and sex. Passion was liberated, and there seemed no end to it: there were million-dollar-bout fights, ticker-tape parades, pole-sitting contests, the tabloid boom, mah-jong, hip-flasks, the handsome and hapless President Harding followed by Coolidge’s prosperity, stock market mania, marathon dancers, and movement, always movement.


pages: 430 words: 109,064

13 Bankers: The Wall Street Takeover and the Next Financial Meltdown by Simon Johnson, James Kwak

American ideology, Andrei Shleifer, Asian financial crisis, asset-backed security, bank run, banking crisis, Bernie Madoff, Bonfire of the Vanities, bonus culture, break the buck, business cycle, buy and hold, capital controls, Carmen Reinhart, central bank independence, Charles Lindbergh, collapse of Lehman Brothers, collateralized debt obligation, commoditize, corporate governance, corporate raider, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, crony capitalism, Edward Glaeser, Eugene Fama: efficient market hypothesis, financial deregulation, financial innovation, financial intermediation, financial repression, fixed income, George Akerlof, Gordon Gekko, greed is good, Home mortgage interest deduction, Hyman Minsky, income per capita, information asymmetry, interest rate derivative, interest rate swap, Kenneth Rogoff, laissez-faire capitalism, late fees, light touch regulation, Long Term Capital Management, market bubble, market fundamentalism, Martin Wolf, money market fund, moral hazard, mortgage tax deduction, Myron Scholes, Paul Samuelson, Ponzi scheme, price stability, profit maximization, race to the bottom, regulatory arbitrage, rent-seeking, Robert Bork, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, Ronald Reagan, Saturday Night Live, Satyajit Das, sovereign wealth fund, The Myth of the Rational Market, too big to fail, transaction costs, value at risk, yield curve

Opponents argued that the problem was a cabal of big banks that were secretly running the country. This fear was likely exaggerated, but there is no doubt that Wall Street banks played a critical role in creating the industrial trusts. In 1912, the House of Representatives, then controlled by the Democratic Party, commissioned an investigation of the “money trust” and its economic influence. (The investigation was proposed by Representative Charles Lindbergh Sr., who called the Aldrich plan a “wonderfully devised plan specifically fitted for Wall Street securing control of the world.”67) The Pujo Committee concluded that control of credit was concentrated in the hands of a small group of Wall Street bankers, who had used their central place in the financial system to amass considerable economic power.68 The committee report provided ammunition to Louis Brandeis, a prominent lawyer and future Supreme Court justice.


Lonely Planet's Best of USA by Lonely Planet

Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Airbnb, Bay Area Rapid Transit, Berlin Wall, big-box store, Burning Man, car-free, carbon footprint, Charles Lindbergh, East Village, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Francisco Pizarro, Frank Gehry, Golden Gate Park, haute cuisine, mass immigration, obamacare, ride hailing / ride sharing, Ronald Reagan, Rosa Parks, Silicon Valley, South of Market, San Francisco, the High Line, the payments system, transcontinental railway, upwardly mobile, urban planning, urban renewal, Works Progress Administration

Same-day tickets for a timed entrance are available at the kiosk (Map; 15th St, btwn Madison Dr NW & Jefferson Dr SW; hfrom 8:30am) by the monument. Arrive early. (www.nps.gov/wamo; 2 15th St NW; h9am-5pm, to 10pm Jun-Aug; gCirculator, mSmithsonian) F National Air & Space Museum Museum The Air and Space Museum is one of the most popular Smithsonian museums. Everyone flocks to see the Wright brothers’ flyer, Chuck Yeager’s Bell X-1, Charles Lindbergh’s Spirit of St Louis, Amelia Earhart’s natty red plane and the Apollo Lunar Module. (www.airandspace.si.edu; cnr 6th St & Independence Ave SW; h10am-5:30pm, to 7:30pm mid-Mar–early Sep; Wc; gCirculator, mL’Enfant Plaza) F National Gallery of Art Museum Map Google Map The staggering collection spans the Middle Ages to the present. The neoclassical west building showcases European art through the early 1900s.


pages: 391 words: 105,382

Utopia Is Creepy: And Other Provocations by Nicholas Carr

Air France Flight 447, Airbnb, Airbus A320, AltaVista, Amazon Mechanical Turk, augmented reality, autonomous vehicles, Bernie Sanders, book scanning, Brewster Kahle, Buckminster Fuller, Burning Man, Captain Sullenberger Hudson, centralized clearinghouse, Charles Lindbergh, cloud computing, cognitive bias, collaborative consumption, computer age, corporate governance, crowdsourcing, Danny Hillis, deskilling, digital map, disruptive innovation, Donald Trump, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, Elon Musk, factory automation, failed state, feminist movement, Frederick Winslow Taylor, friendly fire, game design, global village, Google bus, Google Glasses, Google X / Alphabet X, Googley, hive mind, impulse control, indoor plumbing, interchangeable parts, Internet Archive, invention of movable type, invention of the steam engine, invisible hand, Isaac Newton, Jeff Bezos, jimmy wales, Joan Didion, job automation, Kevin Kelly, lifelogging, low skilled workers, Marc Andreessen, Mark Zuckerberg, Marshall McLuhan, means of production, Menlo Park, mental accounting, natural language processing, Network effects, new economy, Nicholas Carr, Norman Mailer, off grid, oil shale / tar sands, Peter Thiel, plutocrats, Plutocrats, profit motive, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Ray Kurzweil, recommendation engine, Republic of Letters, robot derives from the Czech word robota Czech, meaning slave, Ronald Reagan, self-driving car, SETI@home, side project, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley ideology, Singularitarianism, Snapchat, social graph, social web, speech recognition, Startup school, stem cell, Stephen Hawking, Steve Jobs, Steven Levy, technoutopianism, the medium is the message, theory of mind, Turing test, Whole Earth Catalog, Y Combinator

As we become more expert in the use of a tool, our sense of responsibility for it naturally strengthens. To the novice mower, a scythe may feel like a foreign object in the hands; to the accomplished mower, hands and scythe become one thing. Talent tightens the bond between an instrument and its user. This feeling of physical and ethical entanglement doesn’t have to go away as technologies become more complex. In reporting on his historic solo flight across the Atlantic in 1927, Charles Lindbergh spoke of his plane and himself as if they were a single being: “We have made this flight across the ocean, not I or it.” The airplane was a complicated system encompassing many components, but to a skilled pilot it still had the intimate quality of a hand tool. The love that lays the swale in rows is also the love that parts the clouds for the stick-and-rudder man. Automation weakens the bond between tool and user not because computer-controlled systems are complex but because they ask so little of us.


pages: 502 words: 107,657

Predictive Analytics: The Power to Predict Who Will Click, Buy, Lie, or Die by Eric Siegel

Albert Einstein, algorithmic trading, Amazon Mechanical Turk, Apple's 1984 Super Bowl advert, backtesting, Black Swan, book scanning, bounce rate, business intelligence, business process, butter production in bangladesh, call centre, Charles Lindbergh, commoditize, computer age, conceptual framework, correlation does not imply causation, crowdsourcing, dark matter, data is the new oil, en.wikipedia.org, Erik Brynjolfsson, Everything should be made as simple as possible, experimental subject, Google Glasses, happiness index / gross national happiness, job satisfaction, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, lifelogging, Machine translation of "The spirit is willing, but the flesh is weak." to Russian and back, mass immigration, Moneyball by Michael Lewis explains big data, Nate Silver, natural language processing, Netflix Prize, Network effects, Norbert Wiener, personalized medicine, placebo effect, prediction markets, Ray Kurzweil, recommendation engine, risk-adjusted returns, Ronald Coase, Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, self-driving car, sentiment analysis, Shai Danziger, software as a service, speech recognition, statistical model, Steven Levy, text mining, the scientific method, The Signal and the Noise by Nate Silver, The Wisdom of Crowds, Thomas Bayes, Thomas Davenport, Turing test, Watson beat the top human players on Jeopardy!, X Prize, Yogi Berra, zero-sum game

Following the 1997 chess match in which IBM’s Deep Blue computer defeated then world champion Garry Kasparov, the 2011 Jeopardy! broadcast pitted man against machine just as publicly, and with a renewed, healthy dose of bravado. A national audience of Jeopardy! viewers awaited on the horizon. As with all grand challenges, success was not a certainty. No precedent or principle had ensured it would be possible to fly across the Atlantic (Charles Lindbergh did so to win $25,000 in 1927); walk on the moon (NASA’s Apollo 11 brought people there in 1969, achieving the goal John F. Kennedy’s set for that decade); beat a chess grandmaster with a computer (IBM’s Deep Blue in 1997); or even improve Netflix’s movie recommendation system by 10 percent (2009, as detailed in the previous chapter). Reproduced with permission. In great need of a breakthrough, IBM tackled the technical challenge with the force only a mega-multinational enterprise can muster.


pages: 331 words: 104,366

Deep Thinking: Where Machine Intelligence Ends and Human Creativity Begins by Garry Kasparov

3D printing, Ada Lovelace, AI winter, Albert Einstein, AltaVista, barriers to entry, Berlin Wall, business process, call centre, Charles Lindbergh, clean water, computer age, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, David Brooks, Donald Trump, Douglas Hofstadter, Drosophila, Elon Musk, Erik Brynjolfsson, factory automation, Freestyle chess, Gödel, Escher, Bach, job automation, Leonard Kleinrock, low earth orbit, Mikhail Gorbachev, Nate Silver, Norbert Wiener, packet switching, pattern recognition, Ray Kurzweil, Richard Feynman, rising living standards, rolodex, Second Machine Age, self-driving car, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, Skype, speech recognition, stem cell, Stephen Hawking, Steven Pinker, technological singularity, The Coming Technological Singularity, The Signal and the Noise by Nate Silver, Turing test, Vernor Vinge, Watson beat the top human players on Jeopardy!, zero-sum game

I want to get all this out of the way because my attitude about losing inevitably comes up in any discussion of my match with the IBM supercomputer Deep Blue. To be more precise, my rematch with Deep Blue in 1997. I am resigned to the fact that almost no one remembers I beat Deep Blue in our first match in 1996. “This Day in History” calendars don’t have entries for all the failed attempts to fly across the Atlantic before Charles Lindbergh succeeded in 1927. When the 1996 match is remembered at all, it’s because my loss in game one was the first time a machine had beaten the world champion in a classical time control game. Prior to that, I had played quite a few games against machines at faster time controls and lost a number of them. What we call “rapid” games allow between fifteen and thirty minutes per player for the whole game.


pages: 407 words: 109,653

Top Dog: The Science of Winning and Losing by Po Bronson, Ashley Merryman

Asperger Syndrome, Berlin Wall, Charles Lindbergh, conceptual framework, crowdsourcing, delayed gratification, deliberate practice, Edward Glaeser, experimental economics, Fall of the Berlin Wall, fear of failure, game design, industrial cluster, Jean Tirole, knowledge worker, longitudinal study, loss aversion, Mark Zuckerberg, meta analysis, meta-analysis, Mikhail Gorbachev, phenotype, Richard Feynman, risk tolerance, school choice, selection bias, shareholder value, Silicon Valley, six sigma, Steve Jobs, zero-sum game

Chemical fire extinguishers are based on Ambrose Godfrey’s 1761 prize-winning entry for a contest to come up with ideas for putting out fires. Hyppolyte Mège-Mouriés’s margarine was the winning entry for Napoleon III’s competition for a butter-substitute that could be sent to the troops in the field. (Napoleon I’s contest to feed the troops was the catalyst for Nicholas Appert’s 1809 innovation in bottling food.) Charles Lindbergh’s 1927 transcontinental flight was for a contest sponsored by Raymond Orteig, a French hotel owner who hoped to spur the French tourism and hotel industries. In 2006, an Apple user started publicly asking for donations to sponsor a competition for software that would translate PC software for Macs. He received so many donations that Apple itself decided to develop the software. Beersman, Bianca, John R.


pages: 341 words: 116,854

The Devil's Playground: A Century of Pleasure and Profit in Times Square by James Traub

Anton Chekhov, Broken windows theory, Buckminster Fuller, Charles Lindbergh, delayed gratification, Donald Trump, fear of failure, intangible asset, Jane Jacobs, jitney, light touch regulation, megastructure, New Urbanism, Peter Eisenman, plutocrats, Plutocrats, price mechanism, rent control, Ronald Reagan, upwardly mobile, urban planning, urban renewal

For all the virtuoso eclecticism, Strike Up the Band is generally considered the first musical in which the songs emerge directly from the narrative, just as June Moon was one of the first Broadway plays in which the humor is rooted in character. Nineteen twenty-seven was an astonishing year. Broadway theaters staged an average of 225 shows a year during the decade; in 1927 the figure reached 264, a figure never equaled before or since. It was not only one of the greatest seasons in the history of Broadway, but the year of Babe Ruth’s sixty home runs and Charles Lindbergh’s successful transatlantic flight, a year of heroes and parades and headlines. The stock market was making everybody rich, elevator boys as well as bankers. “The uncertainties of 1920 were drowned out in a steady golden roar,” Fitzgerald later wrote. “The parties were bigger . . . the shows were broader, the buildings were higher, the morals were looser and the liquor was cheaper.” It was a moment of frenzy that was bound to spend itself, though you would think, from Fitzgerald’s apocalyptic disgust, that the catastrophe of the Depression arrived as a biblical punishment for wantonness.


pages: 401 words: 115,959

Philanthrocapitalism by Matthew Bishop, Michael Green, Bill Clinton

Albert Einstein, anti-communist, barriers to entry, battle of ideas, Bernie Madoff, Bob Geldof, Bonfire of the Vanities, business process, business process outsourcing, Charles Lindbergh, clean water, cleantech, corporate governance, corporate social responsibility, Dava Sobel, David Ricardo: comparative advantage, don't be evil, family office, financial innovation, full employment, global pandemic, global village, God and Mammon, Hernando de Soto, high net worth, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), invisible hand, James Dyson, John Harrison: Longitude, joint-stock company, knowledge economy, knowledge worker, Live Aid, lone genius, Marc Andreessen, market bubble, mass affluent, microcredit, Mikhail Gorbachev, Nelson Mandela, new economy, offshore financial centre, old-boy network, peer-to-peer lending, performance metric, Peter Singer: altruism, plutocrats, Plutocrats, profit maximization, profit motive, Richard Feynman, risk tolerance, risk-adjusted returns, Ronald Coase, Ronald Reagan, shareholder value, Silicon Valley, Slavoj Žižek, South Sea Bubble, sovereign wealth fund, stem cell, Steve Jobs, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, The Wisdom of Crowds, Thomas Malthus, Thorstein Veblen, trade liberalization, transaction costs, trickle-down economics, wealth creators, winner-take-all economy, working poor, World Values Survey, X Prize

ALL SHALL HAVE PRIZES The nineteenth-century Swedish munitions baron Alfred Nobel is the most famous prize giver—an act of atonement for the invention of dynamite, so the story goes—rewarding annually since 1901 achievements in physics, chemistry, medicine, literature, and peace (the economics prize is not actually a Nobel Prize). Prizes to incentivize innovation also have a long history. The race to win a £20,000 prize offered by the British Parliament in the eighteenth century for a solution to how to measure longitude, and the struggle of clockmaker John Harrison to convince the government-appointed panel that he had won, is described in Dava Sobel’s 1995 bestseller, Longitude. Charles Lindbergh flew the Atlantic in 1927 to win a $25,000 prize offered by Raymond Orteig, a hotelier. Now they are back in fashion. The breakthrough moment came when SpaceShipOne won the $10 million X Prize, created by Peter Diamandis, for the first privately funded space flight. In October 2006, the X Prize Foundation launched its second prize, for genomics: $10 million to the first inventor able to sequence a hundred human genomes in ten days.


pages: 349 words: 114,914

We Were Eight Years in Power: An American Tragedy by Ta-Nehisi Coates

affirmative action, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Bernie Madoff, Bernie Sanders, Broken windows theory, Charles Lindbergh, crack epidemic, crony capitalism, David Brooks, deindustrialization, desegregation, Donald Trump, fear of failure, Ferguson, Missouri, Gunnar Myrdal, housing crisis, Howard Zinn, income inequality, jitney, low skilled workers, mandatory minimum, mass incarceration, moral panic, new economy, obamacare, payday loans, phenotype, Ronald Reagan, Rosa Parks, single-payer health, The Bell Curve by Richard Herrnstein and Charles Murray, War on Poverty, white flight

My guide was Timuel Black, ninety years old, who’d fought in World War II, helped bring Martin Luther King Jr. to the city, and, in his later years, turned to compiling an oral history of the Great Migration. A slight, energetic man with a gray mustache, he stepped into the car wearing a blue Obama/Biden hat, and we were off. For three hours, we followed the map of his memories across the South Side, down Cottage Grove, across Hyde Park Boulevard, down through Michelle’s old neighborhood of South Shore. Black was seven when he saw Charles Lindbergh parading down Grand Boulevard, later rechristened Martin Luther King Jr. Drive. He pointed out Joe Louis’s home, and black Chicago’s old commercial district, the Stroll, where he’d seen all the jazz acts. The South Side’s sheer mass and its shifting character astonished me. Bungalows would give way to mansions, mansions to burned-out lots, and at every gas station, panhandlers waited in search of change.


pages: 441 words: 113,244

Seasteading: How Floating Nations Will Restore the Environment, Enrich the Poor, Cure the Sick, and Liberate Humanity From Politicians by Joe Quirk, Patri Friedman

3D printing, access to a mobile phone, addicted to oil, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, agricultural Revolution, Albert Einstein, barriers to entry, Branko Milanovic, British Empire, Buckminster Fuller, Burning Man, business climate, business cycle, business process, California gold rush, Celtic Tiger, Charles Lindbergh, clean water, Colonization of Mars, Dean Kamen, Deng Xiaoping, drone strike, Elon Musk, en.wikipedia.org, failed state, financial intermediation, Gini coefficient, happiness index / gross national happiness, income inequality, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), joint-stock company, joint-stock limited liability company, Kickstarter, low skilled workers, Machinery of Freedom by David Friedman, Mark Zuckerberg, megacity, minimum wage unemployment, Network effects, new economy, obamacare, offshore financial centre, open borders, paypal mafia, peak oil, Peter H. Diamandis: Planetary Resources, Peter Thiel, price stability, profit motive, Ronald Coase, Ronald Reagan, Shenzhen was a fishing village, Silicon Valley, special economic zone, standardized shipping container, stem cell, trade route, UNCLOS, UNCLOS, undersea cable, young professional

The Floating City That Almost Was Oceanographers often remark that we know more about the surface of Mars than we know about the seafloor. In our race to space, why have we skipped the sea? We can blame the Great Depression of the 1930s. In 1915 engineer and inventor Edward Robert Armstrong designed “seadromes,” floating airports anchored to the ocean floor that would allow planes to refuel for transatlantic flights. After more than a decade of tests, Armstrong built a working scale model close to shore in 1926. When Charles Lindbergh completed the first transatlantic flight a year later, flying from Long Island to Paris in the Spirit of St. Louis, newspapers featured Armstrong’s vision, and investors backed his plan. The Depression postponed Armstrong’s ambitions until World War II, when aircraft carriers rendered his concept obsolete. But civilization still owes a great debt to Edward Robert Armstrong, whose design was applied to the development of floating oil rigs, which pump lifeblood into our global economy.


pages: 422 words: 114,198

The Wright Brothers by David McCullough

Charles Lindbergh, Louis Blériot, moral hazard, NetJets

Air Services in 1945, he made plain that Whitehead was a man of delusions. Strangely, the story still draws attention, despite the fact that there is still no proof. Advances in aviation all the while had been accelerating faster than Orville or anyone of his generation had thought possible, and starting with World War I to a form of weaponry like nothing before in human experience. In 1927 young Charles Lindbergh flew the Atlantic to land in Paris, a feat once thought impossible by the Wrights. On his return to America, Lindbergh made a point of coming to Dayton to pay his respects to Orville at Hawthorn Hill, an event that caused excitement in Dayton of a kind not seen since the brothers had made their celebrated return from Europe eighteen years before. Orville lived to see, too, the horrific death and destruction wrought by the giant bombers of World War II and in several interviews tried as best he could to speak both for himself and for Wilbur.


pages: 425 words: 116,409

Hidden Figures by Margot Lee Shetterly

affirmative action, Charles Lindbergh, cognitive dissonance, desegregation, en.wikipedia.org, European colonialism, glass ceiling, Gunnar Myrdal, low earth orbit, Mahatma Gandhi, New Journalism, orbital mechanics / astrodynamics, RAND corporation, Rosa Parks, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, upwardly mobile, women in the workforce, éminence grise

Employees learned to keep mum on the work front even at the family dinner table. But even if they wanted to share the particulars of the day’s toil, finding someone outside of Langley who understood what they were talking about would have been well nigh impossible. In the twenty-four years since the Langley laboratory had started operation, the glitterati of the aeronautical world had made pilgrimages to Hampton. Orville Wright and Charles Lindbergh served on the NACA’s executive committee. Amelia Earhart nearly lost her raccoon coat to a wind tunnel’s giant turbine while touring the lab. Tycoon Howard Hughes made an appearance at the lab’s 1934 research conference, and Hollywood showed up at the airfield to shoot the 1938 movie Test Pilot, starring Clark Gable, Spencer Tracey, and Myrna Loy. The people the famous came to see—Eastman Jacobs, Max Munk, Robert Jones, Theodore Theodorsen—were the best minds in a thrilling new discipline.


pages: 501 words: 114,888

The Future Is Faster Than You Think: How Converging Technologies Are Transforming Business, Industries, and Our Lives by Peter H. Diamandis, Steven Kotler

Ada Lovelace, additive manufacturing, Airbnb, Albert Einstein, Amazon Mechanical Turk, augmented reality, autonomous vehicles, barriers to entry, bitcoin, blockchain, blood diamonds, Burning Man, call centre, cashless society, Charles Lindbergh, Clayton Christensen, clean water, cloud computing, Colonization of Mars, computer vision, creative destruction, crowdsourcing, cryptocurrency, Dean Kamen, delayed gratification, dematerialisation, digital twin, disruptive innovation, Edward Glaeser, Edward Lloyd's coffeehouse, Elon Musk, en.wikipedia.org, epigenetics, Erik Brynjolfsson, Ethereum, ethereum blockchain, experimental economics, food miles, game design, Geoffrey West, Santa Fe Institute, gig economy, Google X / Alphabet X, gravity well, hive mind, housing crisis, Hyperloop, indoor plumbing, industrial robot, informal economy, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Internet of things, invention of the telegraph, Isaac Newton, Jaron Lanier, Jeff Bezos, job automation, Joseph Schumpeter, Kevin Kelly, Kickstarter, late fees, Law of Accelerating Returns, life extension, lifelogging, loss aversion, Lyft, M-Pesa, Mary Lou Jepsen, mass immigration, megacity, meta analysis, meta-analysis, microbiome, mobile money, multiplanetary species, Narrative Science, natural language processing, Network effects, new economy, New Urbanism, Oculus Rift, out of africa, packet switching, peer-to-peer lending, Peter H. Diamandis: Planetary Resources, Peter Thiel, QR code, RAND corporation, Ray Kurzweil, RFID, Richard Feynman, Richard Florida, ride hailing / ride sharing, risk tolerance, Satoshi Nakamoto, Second Machine Age, self-driving car, Silicon Valley, Skype, smart cities, smart contracts, smart grid, Snapchat, sovereign wealth fund, special economic zone, stealth mode startup, stem cell, Stephen Hawking, Steve Jobs, Steven Pinker, Stewart Brand, supercomputer in your pocket, supply-chain management, technoutopianism, Tesla Model S, Tim Cook: Apple, transaction costs, Uber and Lyft, uber lyft, unbanked and underbanked, underbanked, urban planning, Watson beat the top human players on Jeopardy!, We wanted flying cars, instead we got 140 characters, X Prize

You will continue to receive exclusive offers in your inbox. I dedicate this book to all who have mentored and coached me during my life: Harry P. Diamandis, Tula Diamandis, Frank Price, David C. Webb, Paul E. Gray, David E. Wine, Gregg E. Maryniak, Ayn Rand, Art Dula, Robert Heinlein, Byron K. Lichtenberg, Sylvia Earle, Gerard K. O’Neill, Arthur C. Clarke, John T. Chirban, Laurence R. Young, Martine Rothblatt, Charles Lindbergh, Tom Velez, Stuart O. Witt, S. Pete Worden, Robert K. Weiss, Alfred H. Kerth, Burt Rutan, Anousheh Ansari, Tony Robbins, Ray Kurzweil, and Dan Sullivan. —Peter This one is for the late Joe Lefler and the crew from Pandora’s Box. Thanks for so much magic. Thanks for believing in me long before anyone else did. Thanks for Derek Dingle’s cockroach pass. Still miss you. Down the funny stairs.


pages: 422 words: 119,123

To the Edges of the Earth: 1909, the Race for the Three Poles, and the Climax of the Age of Exploration by Edward J. Larson

back-to-the-land, British Empire, Charles Lindbergh, Eratosthenes, European colonialism, Fellow of the Royal Society, Livingstone, I presume, Scientific racism, the scientific method, trade route, yellow journalism

Aviation, of course, offered a place for heroics before 1909, but it literally took off with improvements in aircraft during and after World War I. Amundsen quickly adopted it as a means for Arctic exploration, ending in his death during a rescue flight in 1928. The American Richard Byrd became a national hero for his pioneering flights toward the North and South Poles during the late 1920s, while Charles Lindbergh attained the status of a living legend for completing the first solo flight across the Atlantic Ocean on May 21, 1927. With the refinement of jet and rocket engines following World War II, test pilots like Chuck Yeager set altitude and speed records beginning in the late 1940s, while Soviet cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin and American astronaut John Glenn gained worldwide acclaim for orbiting the earth during the early 1960s.


Time of the Magicians: Wittgenstein, Benjamin, Cassirer, Heidegger, and the Decade That Reinvented Philosophy by Wolfram Eilenberger

Albert Einstein, Charles Lindbergh, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Johannes Kepler, liberation theology, precariat, scientific worldview, side project, traveling salesman, wikimedia commons

That decade rightly saw itself as a time of unprecedented, world-changing innovations, above all of a technical kind. The automobile, now mass-produced, began to determine the shape of cities; radio became a global medium of communication in the public sphere, the telephone in the private; cinema became an art form; the first commercial airlines were launched; now not only steamships but soon also zeppelins and even airplanes crossed the oceans, with Charles Lindbergh paving the way. The twenties witnessed the birth of an age of global communication facilitated by and in turn facilitating leaps in technical innovation. It persists into our own time. No individual and no individual discipline could keep interpretative pace. Not even philosophy. Precisely in the German-speaking world it saw itself as being propelled forward by progress; it wanted at best to act as its critical brake, not its driving engine.


pages: 431 words: 118,074

The Ultimate Engineer: The Remarkable Life of NASA's Visionary Leader George M. Low by Richard Jurek

additive manufacturing, affirmative action, Charles Lindbergh, cognitive dissonance, en.wikipedia.org, fudge factor, John Conway, low earth orbit, Mars Rover, operation paperclip, orbital mechanics / astrodynamics, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley ideology, Stewart Brand, undersea cable, uranium enrichment, Whole Earth Catalog, Winter of Discontent, women in the workforce

This is another important aspect of the economic benefits that flow from our programs in aeronautics and space to the broad economy.”117 Low took his speech on the road to aeronautical industry conferences. At a dinner for the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics in June 1973, his keynote speech focused on the key economic benefits of space exploration. “When the Wright brothers first flew in 1903, many people asked, ‘Why?’” he told the crowd. “They said the same thing again when Charles Lindbergh flew nonstop across the Atlantic in 1927. People now ask about the moon landings in the same, skeptical tone, ‘Why?’” He named some of the recent practical applications in science and medicine that were currently providing major benefits, before he centered on the field of communications. “Breakthroughs are already being made. For example, fifteen years ago, no one would have predicted color television broadcasts from China would have been possible.”


pages: 1,336 words: 415,037

The Snowball: Warren Buffett and the Business of Life by Alice Schroeder

affirmative action, Albert Einstein, anti-communist, Ayatollah Khomeini, barriers to entry, Bob Noyce, Bonfire of the Vanities, Brownian motion, capital asset pricing model, card file, centralized clearinghouse, Charles Lindbergh, collateralized debt obligation, computerized trading, corporate governance, corporate raider, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, desegregation, Donald Trump, Eugene Fama: efficient market hypothesis, Everybody Ought to Be Rich, global village, Golden Gate Park, Haight Ashbury, haute cuisine, Honoré de Balzac, If something cannot go on forever, it will stop - Herbert Stein's Law, In Cold Blood by Truman Capote, index fund, indoor plumbing, intangible asset, interest rate swap, invisible hand, Isaac Newton, Jeff Bezos, John Meriwether, joint-stock company, joint-stock limited liability company, Long Term Capital Management, Louis Bachelier, margin call, market bubble, Marshall McLuhan, medical malpractice, merger arbitrage, Mikhail Gorbachev, money market fund, moral hazard, NetJets, new economy, New Journalism, North Sea oil, paper trading, passive investing, Paul Samuelson, pets.com, plutocrats, Plutocrats, Ponzi scheme, Ralph Nader, random walk, Ronald Reagan, Scientific racism, shareholder value, short selling, side project, Silicon Valley, Steve Ballmer, Steve Jobs, supply-chain management, telemarketer, The Predators' Ball, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thomas Malthus, too big to fail, transcontinental railway, Upton Sinclair, War on Poverty, Works Progress Administration, Y2K, yellow journalism, zero-coupon bond

In the firm’s first month of operation, as financial panic spread around the world, he produced $400 of commissions and the firm was profitable.14 Through the ensuing months, even as people’s savings evaporated and faith in banks disappeared, Howard stuck to the same kind of conservative investments that had gotten him started, steadily adding customers and growing his business.15 The family’s fortunes had turned around. Then, shortly before Warren’s second birthday, twenty-month-old Charles Lindbergh Jr. was kidnapped and murdered in March 1932. The snatching of the “Lone Eagle’s” baby was “the biggest story since the Resurrection,” according to pundit H. L. Mencken. The country flew into a kidnapping paranoia in which parents conveyed their terror of abduction to their children, the Buffetts being no exception.16 Around then, Howard suffered some kind of attack serious enough for Leila to call an ambulance.

, which had quadrupled in the last year. Yahoo!, which captured the spirit of the times in its name, was now valued at $115 billion. As 1999 spun to a close, there was no doubt who was important and influential at the turn of the millennium, and even less doubt who was not. Time magazine crowned Amazon.com’s Jeff Bezos as its person of the year, comparing him in importance to Queen Elizabeth, Charles Lindbergh, and Martin Luther King Jr. Buffett’s personal ranking had dropped on the annual taking-stock lists, which multiplied a thousandfold that year with the millennial summings-up and retrospectives. He had just fallen from being the second-richest to the fourth-richest man in the world. Technophiles reveled in pointing out the great investor’s feet of clay, saying that “if Buffett headed a mutual fund, he’d be looking at a second career.”38 Barron’s, a weekly must-read on Wall Street, put him on its cover with the accompanying headline “Warren, What’s Wrong?”

It kicked the quivering legs out from under the banking system and sent the already battered economy into collapse. 14. Although its return on revenues was low, the firm by then was consistently profitable and would remain so, with the exception of a couple of months. 15. By the end of 1932, Howard Buffett was averaging 40–50% more in commissions than in 1931, based on financial statements of Buffett, Sklenicka & Co. 16. Charles Lindbergh Jr., “The Little Eaglet,” was kidnapped on March 1, 1932. His body was found on May 12, 1932. Many parents in the 1920s and 1930s were preoccupied with kidnapping, a fear that actually began with the Leopold and Loeb case in 1924 but peaked with the Lindbergh baby. An Omaha country-club groundskeeper claimed he was kidnapped and robbed of $7. In Dallas a minister faked his own kidnapping, trussing himself to his church’s electric fan (Omaha World-Herald, August 4, 1931, and June 20, 1931). 17.


pages: 366 words: 119,981

The Race: The Complete True Story of How America Beat Russia to the Moon by James Schefter

Berlin Wall, Burning Man, Charles Lindbergh, cuban missile crisis, Kitchen Debate, low earth orbit, RAND corporation, Ronald Reagan

There was a place on the edge of town that drew the best of the best in the young field of aeronautics. Langley Field was home to an airport, a small squadron of Army airplanes, and a collection of buildings, most of them wood- or metal-sided, that housed a research organization called the National Advisory Committee on Aeronautics (NACA). The committee itself was a pantheon of aviation legends. Orville Wright was still active. The youngest committee member was Charles Lindbergh. Others included Joe Ames, Harry Guggenheim, and Gus Robins, all pioneers in flight. Bob Gilruth had a job waiting at NACA. He arrived with impressive credentials for a fellow reporting to his first real job. At Minnesota, he’d been a graduate assistant under Dr. Jean Piccard, the famed balloonist, and Piccard’s equally famous and possibly smarter wife, Dr. Jeanette Piccard. He’d spent another term helping to redesign Roscoe Turner’s airplane for the 1936 National Air Race.


pages: 415 words: 103,231

Gusher of Lies: The Dangerous Delusions of Energy Independence by Robert Bryce

addicted to oil, Berlin Wall, Charles Lindbergh, Colonization of Mars, decarbonisation, en.wikipedia.org, energy security, energy transition, financial independence, flex fuel, hydrogen economy, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), John Markoff, Just-in-time delivery, low earth orbit, Nelson Mandela, new economy, oil shale / tar sands, oil shock, peak oil, price stability, Project for a New American Century, rolodex, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, Stewart Brand, Thomas L Friedman, Whole Earth Catalog, X Prize, Yom Kippur War

The money and refereeing for the Superbattery Prize could be provided by either the U.S. Department of Energy or, better yet, a consortium of private foundations. There is plenty of precedent for using prize money to drive innovation. In 1919, a hotelier named Raymond Orteig offered $25,000 to the 278 GUSHER OF LIES first pilot who could fly nonstop between New York and Paris. Eight years later, a previously unknown American named Charles Lindbergh collected that prize.67 More recently, aviation whiz Burt Rutan, backed by billionaire Paul Allen, collected the $10-million Ansari X Prize, which was offered to the first privately built vehicle that could fly to the edge of space, return to earth, and repeat the feat within two weeks. In 2004, their creation, SpaceShipOne, made two trips into low-earth orbit, and Rutan and Allen claimed the $10-million prize.


pages: 521 words: 125,749

Fallen Astronauts: Heroes Who Died Reaching for the Moon by Colin Burgess, Kate Doolan

Charles Lindbergh, Ferguson, Missouri, Mikhail Gorbachev, profit motive, Ronald Reagan

After half a day of ground school and another half day's flying, the instructor asked Hall and Dellorto if they would like to attend a meeting that night of the Quiet Birdmen, to be held in the Skylane Motel in Pearland. Each year these aviation enthusiasts, pilots, and other special guests would gather to salute fallen comrades and discuss their part in the world of aviation. Hall was familiar with the Birdmen and had always wanted to join the organization, founded by Charles Lindbergh many years before. Each local area chapter of the Quiet Birdmen held a monthly meeting, and prospective members had to be invited to, and attend, twelve meetings before consideration could be given for full membership. Hall had been to one other meeting, which he had enjoyed a great deal, so he jumped at the opportunity to attend another. He came from a family well entrenched in aviation and the air force.


Beggars in Spain by Nancy Kress

Cepheid variable, Charles Lindbergh, double helix, gravity well, index card, indoor plumbing, job automation, phenotype, union organizing

The New York Times ran an editorial, widely reprinted on the electronic news services: PROSPERITY AND HATRED: A LOGIC CURVE WE’D RATHER NOT SEE The United States has never been a country that much values calm, logic, and rationality. We have, as a people, tended to label these things “cold.” We have, as a people, tended to admire feeling and action. We exalt in our stories and our memorials—not the creation of the Constitution but its defense at Iwo Jima; not the intellectual achievements of a Linus Pauling but the heroic passion of a Charles Lindbergh; not the inventors of the mono-rails and computers that unite us but the composers of the angry songs of rebellion that divide us. A peculiar aspect of this phenomenon is that it grows stronger in times of prosperity. The better off our citizenry, the greater their contempt for the calm reasoning that got them there, and the more passionate their indulgence in emotion. Consider, in the past century, the gaudy excesses of the roaring twenties and the antiestablishment contempt of the sixties.


pages: 437 words: 126,860

Case for Mars by Robert Zubrin

Charles Lindbergh, Colonization of Mars, gravity well, Johannes Kepler, Kevin Kelly, low earth orbit, Mars Rover, orbital mechanics / astrodynamics, planetary scale, skunkworks, spice trade, telerobotics, uranium enrichment

Success or failure with this approach depends solely upon the ingenuity of the American people and the workings of the free enterprise system, not upon political wrangling. The tactic not only guarantees economic results, but it also promotes quick results and smart results. When people have their own money at stake, it’s a lot easier to find and settle on practical, no-nonsense solutions to engineering problems than is ever the case in the complex and endless deliberations of a government bureaucracy. Readers may recall that when Charles Lindbergh flew the Atlantic, he did not do it as part of a government-funded program, but in pursuit of a privately posted prize. There were many such prizes offered for breakthrough technical accomplishments in aviation’s early years, and collectively they played a major role in raising the art of flight from its infancy to a globe-spanning transportation network. There are other advantages to this approach as well.


pages: 452 words: 126,310

The Case for Space: How the Revolution in Spaceflight Opens Up a Future of Limitless Possibility by Robert Zubrin

Ada Lovelace, Albert Einstein, anthropic principle, battle of ideas, Charles Lindbergh, Colonization of Mars, complexity theory, cosmic microwave background, cosmological principle, discovery of DNA, double helix, Elon Musk, en.wikipedia.org, flex fuel, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, gravity well, if you build it, they will come, Internet Archive, invisible hand, Jeff Bezos, Johannes Kepler, John von Neumann, Kuiper Belt, low earth orbit, Mars Rover, Menlo Park, more computing power than Apollo, Naomi Klein, nuclear winter, off grid, out of africa, Peter H. Diamandis: Planetary Resources, Peter Thiel, place-making, Pluto: dwarf planet, private space industry, rising living standards, Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, self-driving car, Silicon Valley, telerobotics, Thomas Malthus, transcontinental railway, uranium enrichment

One of the first (and least appreciated, because it brought him no money, but perhaps—as we shall see—the most consequential) was the founding of the intercollegiate organization Students for the Exploration and Development of Space (SEDS). Later, working with others, he created the International Space University, a notable institution with a substantial endowment that now has a campus in Strasbourg, France. In the 1990s, he decided to take on the central challenge of opening the space frontier—the creation of reusable space launch systems. After reading a biography of Charles Lindbergh, Diamandis had been impressed by the fact that Lindbergh had flown the Atlantic—and eight others had been motivated to try—for the possibility of winning a prize. Furthermore, the estimated $400,000 (in 1920s money) collectively spent to win the Orteig Prize was much greater than the $25,000 prize fund itself. Not only that, the intellectual impact resulting from Lindbergh's spectacular achievement had resulted in the rapid expansion of the airline industry shortly thereafter.


pages: 422 words: 131,666

Life Inc.: How the World Became a Corporation and How to Take It Back by Douglas Rushkoff

addicted to oil, affirmative action, Amazon Mechanical Turk, anti-globalists, banks create money, big-box store, Bretton Woods, car-free, Charles Lindbergh, colonial exploitation, Community Supported Agriculture, complexity theory, computer age, corporate governance, credit crunch, currency manipulation / currency intervention, David Ricardo: comparative advantage, death of newspapers, don't be evil, Donald Trump, double entry bookkeeping, easy for humans, difficult for computers, financial innovation, Firefox, full employment, global village, Google Earth, greed is good, Howard Rheingold, income per capita, invention of the printing press, invisible hand, Jane Jacobs, John Nash: game theory, joint-stock company, Kevin Kelly, Kickstarter, laissez-faire capitalism, loss aversion, market bubble, market design, Marshall McLuhan, Milgram experiment, moral hazard, mutually assured destruction, Naomi Klein, negative equity, new economy, New Urbanism, Norbert Wiener, peak oil, peer-to-peer, place-making, placebo effect, Ponzi scheme, price mechanism, price stability, principal–agent problem, private military company, profit maximization, profit motive, race to the bottom, RAND corporation, rent-seeking, RFID, road to serfdom, Ronald Reagan, short selling, Silicon Valley, Simon Kuznets, social software, Steve Jobs, Telecommunications Act of 1996, telemarketer, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thomas L Friedman, too big to fail, trade route, trickle-down economics, union organizing, urban decay, urban planning, urban renewal, Vannevar Bush, Victor Gruen, white flight, working poor, Works Progress Administration, Y2K, young professional, zero-sum game

., 1865), 476. 13 “The defendant corporations are persons” Thom Hartmann, Unequal Protection: The Rise of Corporate Dominance and the Theft of Human Rights (New York: Rodale Books, 2002), 105. 15 The anti-Semitic diatribes Ford published Adolf Hitler, Mein Kampf translated by Ralph Manheim (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1939), 639, and Steven Watts, The People’s Tycoon: Henry Ford and the American 15 (New York: Knopf, 2005). 15 American corporations from General Electric Graeme Howard, America and the New World Order (New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1940), and Max Wallace, The American Axis: Henry Ford, Charles Lindbergh, and the Rise of the Third Reich (New York: St. Martin’s Press, 2003). 16 Although he had run for reelection Edward L. Bernays, “The Marketing of National Policies: A Study of War Propaganda,” Journal of Marketing, Vol. 6, No. 3 (1942). 16 Instead of letting them rule themselves Edward L. Bernays, Crystallizing Public Opinion (New York: Kessinger Publishing, 2004), 19. 16 Consumers are easier to please Edward L.


pages: 478 words: 131,657

Tesla: Man Out of Time by Margaret Cheney

Charles Lindbergh, dematerialisation, fudge factor, invention of radio, luminiferous ether, Menlo Park

If they do, a brave nation will hear of this and call for an account.” It came as something of an anticlimax, therefore, when Admiral Cervera, who was himself on the launch, took the Americans to a Spanish fortress where he treated them with great courtesy and soon exchanged them for Spanish prisoners. When this feat of derring-do hit American newspapers, they carried little else for days. Hobson was lionized almost to the same degree that Charles Lindbergh would be much later, after flying the Atlantic. Tesla was filled with pride for his friend and delighted when Hobson was sent home for a round of public appearances across the country to rally greater enthusiasm for the war. Tesla and Johnson took the young officer to Delmonico’s for a promised celebration and referred to him frequently as “the hero.” Later it greatly amused the inventor to read of how women swarmed over Hobson wherever he went.


pages: 453 words: 142,717

The Last Man on the Moon: Astronaut Eugene Cernan and America's Race in Space by Eugene Cernan, Donald A. Davis

Berlin Wall, Charles Lindbergh, Eratosthenes, full employment, Isaac Newton, orbital mechanics / astrodynamics, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, white flight

The fact that Andrew George and Rose Cernan had produced a second child passed unnoticed except for family members and neighbors around our home in the Chicago suburb of Broadview. Other babies, however, did make the news that year. In May, five famous little girls, the Dionne quintuplets, filled a little farm house in Callender, Ontario, Canada. A few months later, an immigrant carpenter named Bruno Richard Haupt-mann was arrested for kidnapping and murdering the infant child of aviation pioneer Charles Lindbergh. And I certainly wasn’t the biggest event that summer in my hometown, since my birth certificate didn’t state that the last man who would walk on the Moon had just been born. No, the headlines went to gangster John Dillinger, who was betrayed by the Woman in Red and shot by g-men as he left a downtown movie theater. Not much was being printed about events in Europe, where ominous clouds were brewing that eventually would darken the entire globe.


pages: 509 words: 132,327

Rise of the Machines: A Cybernetic History by Thomas Rid

1960s counterculture, A Declaration of the Independence of Cyberspace, agricultural Revolution, Albert Einstein, Alistair Cooke, Apple II, Apple's 1984 Super Bowl advert, back-to-the-land, Berlin Wall, British Empire, Brownian motion, Buckminster Fuller, business intelligence, Charles Lindbergh, Claude Shannon: information theory, conceptual framework, connected car, domain-specific language, Douglas Engelbart, Douglas Engelbart, dumpster diving, Extropian, full employment, game design, global village, Haight Ashbury, Howard Rheingold, Jaron Lanier, job automation, John Markoff, John von Neumann, Kevin Kelly, Kubernetes, Marshall McLuhan, Menlo Park, Mitch Kapor, Mother of all demos, new economy, New Journalism, Norbert Wiener, offshore financial centre, oil shale / tar sands, pattern recognition, RAND corporation, Silicon Valley, Simon Singh, speech recognition, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Steven Levy, Stewart Brand, technoutopianism, Telecommunications Act of 1996, telepresence, The Hackers Conference, Vernor Vinge, Whole Earth Catalog, Whole Earth Review, Y2K, Yom Kippur War, Zimmermann PGP

In 1936, the US Army General Staff had cut half of its research-and-development budget, believing that America’s weaponry was adequate and that the money would be better spent on maintenance, repair, and more ordnance.7 After making inquiries, Bush was dismayed to find a military leadership clueless about how science could be useful in war—and scientists clueless about what the military might need in the event of war. Bush’s service on the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA), the organization that preceded NASA, gave him unique insights into cutting-edge aeronautical developments: in 1938, he heard a fellow member, Charles Lindbergh, give a talk after his return from a privileged tour of German munitions and aircraft factories. Lindbergh was impressed by the mighty German war machine, especially by the displays of the seemingly invincible Luftwaffe. And few people understood the power of the flying machines as well as Lindbergh did. Eleven years earlier the aviation pioneer had become the first pilot to fly nonstop from New York to Paris.


pages: 455 words: 131,569

Predator: The Secret Origins of the Drone Revolution by Richard Whittle

Berlin Wall, Charles Lindbergh, cuban missile crisis, drone strike, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, Google Earth, indoor plumbing, Khyber Pass, Kickstarter, Mikhail Gorbachev, precision agriculture, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, Yom Kippur War

Later, Cassidy and the Blue brothers would insist it was pure coincidence that an Arnold Schwarzenegger movie set in Central America and released within days of their first meeting with Bill Sadler was also called Predator. 3 A STRAW HAT IN WINTER Since 1909, with breaks only for wars, the world’s largest and most important aviation exposition and air show has been held in Paris, France. First staged in the city’s magnificent Grand Palais des Beaux-Arts as L’Exposition Internationale de la Locomotion Aérienne, since 1953 the renamed Salon International de l’Aéronautique et de l’Espace has been held four miles north of Paris, at Le Bourget, the city’s first airport, where on May 21, 1927, ecstatic crowds swarmed the Spirit of St. Louis as exhausted American pilot Charles Lindbergh completed the first nonstop transatlantic flight. Now held only in odd-numbered years, the Paris Air Show, as it’s commonly known, attracts aircraft manufacturers, aviation vendors, airline executives, military officers, political leaders, media representatives, and passionate fans of flying from around the globe. Major manufacturers and military powers show off their aircraft in daily aerial displays for the paying public and official attendees.


pages: 440 words: 132,685

The Wizard of Menlo Park: How Thomas Alva Edison Invented the Modern World by Randall E. Stross

Albert Einstein, centralized clearinghouse, Charles Lindbergh, death of newspapers, distributed generation, East Village, Ford paid five dollars a day, I think there is a world market for maybe five computers, interchangeable parts, Isaac Newton, Livingstone, I presume, Marshall McLuhan, Menlo Park, plutocrats, Plutocrats, Saturday Night Live, side project, Silicon Valley, Steve Jobs, Steven Levy, urban renewal

It was conceived by one of Edison’s staff members and was intended to encourage high school students to pursue technical studies in college. Each of the forty-eight states and the District of Columbia were to name a top scholarship designate, and these finalists would answer a questionnaire addressing moral fitness as well as general knowledge, with questions composed not just by Edison, but also by the other judges, who included Henry Ford and Charles Lindbergh. This elaborate nationwide selection apparatus would lead to the selection of a single winner who would receive a four-year scholarship to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. In his business and research projects, Edison became more timid as he became older. While in his thirties, he had had the energy to tackle a problem that had seemed to many to be insoluble: the “subdivision” of the electric light that would make indoor use technically and economically feasible.


USA Travel Guide by Lonely, Planet

1960s counterculture, active transport: walking or cycling, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Albert Einstein, Asilomar, Bay Area Rapid Transit, Berlin Wall, Big bang: deregulation of the City of London, big-box store, bike sharing scheme, Bretton Woods, British Empire, Burning Man, California gold rush, call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, centre right, Charles Lindbergh, Chuck Templeton: OpenTable:, cuban missile crisis, desegregation, Donald Trump, Donner party, East Village, edge city, El Camino Real, Fall of the Berlin Wall, feminist movement, Frank Gehry, glass ceiling, global village, Golden Gate Park, Guggenheim Bilbao, Haight Ashbury, haute couture, haute cuisine, Hernando de Soto, Howard Zinn, illegal immigration, immigration reform, information trail, interchangeable parts, intermodal, jitney, Kickstarter, license plate recognition, Mars Rover, Mason jar, mass immigration, Maui Hawaii, McMansion, Menlo Park, Monroe Doctrine, new economy, New Urbanism, obamacare, off grid, Ralph Nader, Ralph Waldo Emerson, RFID, ride hailing / ride sharing, Ronald Reagan, Rosa Parks, Saturday Night Live, Silicon Valley, South of Market, San Francisco, starchitect, stealth mode startup, stem cell, supervolcano, the built environment, The Chicago School, the High Line, the payments system, trade route, transcontinental railway, union organizing, Upton Sinclair, upwardly mobile, urban decay, urban planning, urban renewal, urban sprawl, walkable city, white flight, working poor, Works Progress Administration, young professional, Zipcar

Until then, you can peruse its temporary galleries on the 2nd floor of the National Museum of American History. All museums are open daily (except Christmas Day) 10am to 5:30pm unless noted. Some have extended hours in summer. Be prepared for lines and bag checks. National Air & Space Museum MUSEUM (cnr 6th St & Independence Ave SW) The Air & Space Museum is the most popular Smithsonian museum; everyone flocks to see the Wright brothers’ flyer, Chuck Yeager’s Bell X-1, Charles Lindbergh’s Spirit of St Louis and the Apollo 11 command module. An IMAX theater, planetarium and ride simulator are all here (adult/child $9/7.50 each). More avionic pieces reside in Virginia at the Steven F Udvar-Hazy Center (Click here), an annex to hold this museum’s leftovers. National Museum of Natural History MUSEUM (cnr 10th St & Constitution Ave SW) A favorite of the kids, the Museum of Natural History showcases dinosaur skeletons, an archae- ology/anthropology collection, wonders from the ocean, and unusual gems and minerals, including the 45-carat Hope Diamond.

History Fur-trapper Pierre Laclede knew prime real estate when he saw it, so he put down stakes at the junction of the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers in 1764. The hustle picked up considerably when prospectors discovered gold in California in 1848 and St Louis became the jump-off point (aka ‘Gateway to the West’) for get-rich-quick dreamers. St Louis became known as a center of innovation after hosting the 1904 World’s Fair. Aviator Charles Lindbergh furthered the reputation in 1927 when he flew the first nonstop, solo transatlantic flight in the ‘Spirit of St Louis,’ named for the far-sighted town that funded the aircraft. Grand plans have always been part of the city’s self-assurance and you’ll find no chips on local shoulders. Sights & Activities The landmark Gateway Arch rises right along the Mississippi River. Downtown runs west of the arch.

The Visitor and Education Center (www.forestparkforever.org; 5595 Grand Dr; 8:30am-7pm Mon-Fri, 9am-4pm Sat & Sun) is in an old streetcar pavilion and has a cafe. Free walking tours leave from here, or you can borrow an iPod audio tour. Missouri History Museum (www.mohistory.org; 5700 Lindell Blvd; 10am-6pm, to 8pm Tue) Presents the story of St Louis, starring such worthies as the World’s Fair, Charles Lindbergh (look for the sales receipt for his first plane – he bought it at a variety store!) and a host of bluesmen. Oral histories from those who fought segregation are moving. St Louis Art Museum (www.slam.org; 1 Fine Arts Dr; 10am-5pm Tue-Sun, to 9pm Fri) A grand beaux-arts palace originally built for the World’s Fair. Now housing this storied institution, its collections span time and styles.


pages: 469 words: 145,094

Endgame: Bobby Fischer's Remarkable Rise and Fall - From America's Brightest Prodigy to the Edge of Madness by Frank Brady

anti-communist, Charles Lindbergh, El Camino Real, illegal immigration, index card, long peace, offshore financial centre, Ponzi scheme, Socratic dialogue

Mayor Lindsay’s limousine was waiting for Bobby when he touched down in New York. Bobby’s retinue included his bodyguard Saemi Palsson and Palsson’s wife, as well as Quinteros. “It’s great to be back in America” was Fischer’s only comment to the waiting reporters. The mayor had offered Bobby a ticker-tape parade down the “Canyon of Heroes” on Broadway in lower Manhattan, a rare honor given in the past to such luminaries as Charles Lindbergh, Franklin D. Roosevelt, and the Apollo astronauts, but Bobby wasn’t much excited by the idea. Friends and advisors reminded him that if he accepted, he’d be the only chess player ever to have a ticker-tape parade, and probably there’d never be another chess player receiving the distinction. He was unmoved: “No, I don’t want it,” he decided. He would, however, agree to a “small” ceremony on the steps of City Hall.


pages: 538 words: 147,612

All the Money in the World by Peter W. Bernstein

Albert Einstein, anti-communist, Berlin Wall, Bill Gates: Altair 8800, call centre, Charles Lindbergh, corporate governance, corporate raider, creative destruction, currency peg, David Brooks, Donald Trump, estate planning, family office, financial innovation, George Gilder, high net worth, invisible hand, Irwin Jacobs: Qualcomm, Jeff Bezos, job automation, job-hopping, John Markoff, Long Term Capital Management, Marc Andreessen, Martin Wolf, Maui Hawaii, means of production, mega-rich, Menlo Park, Mikhail Gorbachev, new economy, Norman Mailer, PageRank, Peter Singer: altruism, pez dispenser, popular electronics, Renaissance Technologies, Rod Stewart played at Stephen Schwarzman birthday party, Ronald Reagan, Sand Hill Road, school vouchers, Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, shareholder value, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, stem cell, Stephen Hawking, Steve Ballmer, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, the new new thing, Thorstein Veblen, too big to fail, traveling salesman, urban planning, wealth creators, William Shockley: the traitorous eight, women in the workforce

His heir, Malcolm “Kim” Chace III, and family, ranked 209 on the Forbes 400 in 2002, with $1 billion in assets. David Gottesman: Ranking 117 on the Forbes 400 in 2006 (net worth: $2.5 billion), Gottesman was an early investor in Berkshire Hathaway because he was a believer in Benjamin Graham, Buffett’s investing mentor. He founded the investment advisory firm First Manhattan Company in New York. Albert Lee Ueltschi: A pilot and associate of Charles Lindbergh, he ranked 258 on the Forbes 400 in 2005 with $1.3 billion. He received 16,256 shares in Berkshire Hathaway in exchange for his pilot training school, Flight Safety International. * * * Consider, for example, Edward S. Lampert, a dapper forty-five-year-old based in Greenwich, Connecticut, who runs one of the biggest hedge funds outside of Wall Street. Lampert is frequently compared to Warren Buffett, his investing model.


pages: 464 words: 155,696

Becoming Steve Jobs: The Evolution of a Reckless Upstart Into a Visionary Leader by Brent Schlender, Rick Tetzeli

Albert Einstein, Apple II, Apple's 1984 Super Bowl advert, Bill Gates: Altair 8800, Bob Noyce, Byte Shop, Charles Lindbergh, computer age, corporate governance, El Camino Real, Isaac Newton, John Markoff, Jony Ive, Kickstarter, Marc Andreessen, market design, McMansion, Menlo Park, Paul Terrell, popular electronics, QWERTY keyboard, Ronald Reagan, Sand Hill Road, side project, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, skunkworks, Steve Ballmer, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Steven Levy, Stewart Brand, Tim Cook: Apple, Wall-E, Watson beat the top human players on Jeopardy!, Whole Earth Catalog

In the early 1900s, Jackling had pioneered open-pit mining, the highly efficient yet disastrously polluting method for reaping low-grade copper that is still used throughout the world. Like Steve, Jackling made a bundle developing his idea, and the Woodside house, designed in Spanish Colonial style, was his personal monument. The rambling 17,000-square-foot structure had fourteen bedrooms, custom-made wrought-iron lamps, and a pipe organ that had been expanded to seventy-one ear-shattering pipes. Charles Lindbergh and Lillian Gish had been feted there at parties that flowed forth from the enormous ballroom. The driveway leading to the mansion showed off its ample landscaped grounds, which had fallen into some disrepair. Some of Steve’s indulgences—a BMW motorcycle and a gray Porsche 911—were parked out front. On the inside it didn’t feel much like a home at all. Steve hadn’t gotten around to buying much furniture.


pages: 516 words: 159,734

War Without Mercy: PACIFIC WAR by John Dower

anti-communist, Bartolomé de las Casas, British Empire, Charles Lindbergh, colonial rule, European colonialism, ghettoisation, Gunnar Myrdal, land reform, Monroe Doctrine, plutocrats, Plutocrats, Scientific racism, South China Sea, Torches of Freedom, transcontinental railway

In many instances, moreover, Japanese who did become prisoners were killed on the spot or en route to the prisoner compounds. Stories of this nature frequently emerge in conversations with veterans of the Pacific War, often–like J. Glenn Gray’s veteran–in a tone almost of disbelief concerning the blind savagery of those days. No source, however, captures the war hates and war crimes of this merciless struggle more soberly than Charles Lindbergh’s diary. For over four months in mid-1944, Lindbergh lived and flew as a civilian observer with U.S. forces based in New Guinea, and as the weeks passed he became deeply troubled, not by the willingness to kill on the part of the soldiers, which he accepted as an inherent part of the war, but by the utter contempt in which Allied fighting men held their Japanese adversaries. The famous “Lone Eagle,” whose isolationist sentiments had placed him among the conservative opponents of President Roosevelt’s policies, really harkened back to what Gray has called the more chivalrous tradition of the professional militarist, who accepts the necessity of war while maintaining respect for his adversary, recognizing courage as courage and duty as duty, irrespective of the uniform worn.


pages: 523 words: 159,884

The Great Railroad Revolution by Christian Wolmar

1919 Motor Transport Corps convoy, accounting loophole / creative accounting, banking crisis, Bay Area Rapid Transit, big-box store, Charles Lindbergh, collective bargaining, cross-subsidies, intermodal, James Watt: steam engine, Kickstarter, Ponzi scheme, quantitative easing, railway mania, Ralph Waldo Emerson, refrigerator car, Silicon Valley, strikebreaker, too big to fail, trade route, transcontinental railway, traveling salesman, union organizing, urban sprawl

By ship and train, the fastest services reached New York just thirteen days after leaving Japan, the principal producer, and in January 1929 a train carrying solely silk covered the route between San Francisco and Chicago in just over two days, a good day and a half faster than the usual passenger services. There was one other famous example showing that, when motivated, the railroad companies could get their act together and provide rapid services. The occasion was, ironically, the return to the United States in June 1927 of aviator Charles Lindbergh following his inaugural transatlantic flight. He arrived in Washington, DC, and most of the newsreel companies, eager to show the footage in the New York news theaters, arranged to fly their film there. However, the International News Reel Company beat all its rivals by using a special train commissioned from the Pennsylvania Railroad equipped with a mobile film laboratory and pulled by a fast steam locomotive.


pages: 286 words: 94,017

Future Shock by Alvin Toffler

Albert Einstein, Brownian motion, Buckminster Fuller, Charles Lindbergh, cognitive dissonance, Colonization of Mars, corporate governance, East Village, global village, Haight Ashbury, information retrieval, invention of agriculture, invention of movable type, invention of writing, longitudinal study, Marshall McLuhan, mass immigration, Menlo Park, New Urbanism, Norman Mailer, post-industrial society, RAND corporation, social intelligence, the market place, Thomas Kuhn: the structure of scientific revolutions, urban renewal, Whole Earth Catalog, zero-sum game

They ranged from Ché Guevara to William Buckley, from Bob Dylan and Joan Baez to Robert Kennedy. "The American youth bag," wrote Speicher, lapsing into hippie jargon, "is overcrowded with heroes." And, he adds, "where heroes are, there are followers, cultists." To the subcult member, its heroes provide what Speicher calls the "crucial existential necessity of psychological identity." This is, of course, hardly new. Earlier generations identified with Charles Lindbergh or Theda Bara. What is new and highly significant, however, is the fabulous proliferation of such heroes and mini-heroes. As subcults multiply and values diversify, we find, in Speicher's words, "a national sense of identity hopelessly fragmented." For the individual, he says, this means greater choice: "There is a wide range of cults available, a wide range of heroes. You can do comparison shopping."


pages: 417 words: 147,682

The Right Stuff by Tom Wolfe

British Empire, Charles Lindbergh, cuban missile crisis, music of the spheres, urban renewal

The selling point for NASA would be that if the seven of them sold exclusive rights to one organization, then they would have a natural shield against the endless requests and intrusions by the rest of the press and would be better able to concentrate on their training. Sure enough, NASA approved the idea, the White House approved it, and DeOrsey started getting in touch with magazines, setting $500,000 as the floor for bids. The one solid offer—$500,000—came from Life, and DeOrsey closed the deal. Life had an excellent precedent for the decision. Few people remembered, but The New York Times had bought the rights to Charles Lindbergh's personal story before his famous transatlantic flight in 1927. It worked out splendidly for both parties. Having bought an exclusive, the Times devoted its first five pages to Lindbergh the day after his flight and the first sixteen the day after he returned from Paris, and all other major newspapers tried their best to keep up. In return for Life's exclusive rights to their personal stories and their wives', the astronauts would share the $500,000 evenly; the sum amounted to just under $24,000 a year for each man over the three years Project Mercury was scheduled to run, about $70,000 in all.


pages: 650 words: 155,108

A Man and His Ship: America's Greatest Naval Architect and His Quest to Build the S.S. United States by Steven Ujifusa

8-hour work day, big-box store, British Empire, Charles Lindbergh, computer age, glass ceiling, haute cuisine, interchangeable parts, Malcom McLean invented shipping containers, Mercator projection, Ronald Reagan, the built environment, trade route

“Now they have ripped out her fittings—the tapestries which the craftsmen of Gobelins took two years to weave,” the piece read, “the paneling made especially for her adornment by a famous artist. Aching, scarred, her gutted timbers gape at a pitiless heaven.”23 As Leviathan was reduced to scrap and Normandie and Queen Mary battled for the Blue Riband, propeller-driven airplanes were making their first scheduled flights across the Atlantic. Even Harry Manning, now commodore of the United States Lines, bought himself an airplane. He and millions of others read about Charles Lindbergh’s solo Atlantic flight in 1927, and Manning began to wonder if someday, sea travel and the Blue Riband would be part of history. Soon after he became president of the United States Lines, John Franklin was appointed a director of the fledgling Trans World Airlines. Its president, Juan Trippe, asked all new directors to make a transatlantic trip aboard one of the new Clipper planes to Europe.


pages: 522 words: 150,592

Atlantic: Great Sea Battles, Heroic Discoveries, Titanic Storms & a Vast Ocean of a Million Stories by Simon Winchester

British Empire, cable laying ship, Charles Lindbergh, colonial rule, friendly fire, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), intermodal, Isaac Newton, Louis Blériot, Malcom McLean invented shipping containers, Nelson Mandela, North Sea oil, Piper Alpha, polynesian navigation, supervolcano, trade route, transatlantic slave trade, transcontinental railway, undersea cable

When the radiomen awoke and realized who the two fliers were, they telegraphed news of their achievement to London. The pair became rich and famous overnight and were knighted by the king only weeks later. Sir John Alcock was killed in a flying accident just a year afterward, and Sir Arthur Whitten Brown lived until 1948. They had crossed the ocean, without stopping, and they had done it in sixteen hours and twenty-seven minutes. When the much more showy and popular Charles Lindbergh single-handedly flew the Spirit of St. Louis from Long Island to Le Bourget in 1927, he gave due credit to the pair: Alcock and Brown, he said, had showed him the way. Amy Johnson and Beryl Markham, who in the 1930s separately became the first of their sex to fly the same ocean westward, were not so generous. The ocean is officially described by the two air traffic control centers that have charge of North Atlantic airspace as a region “moderately hostile to civilian air traffic”—it is vast, there are no navigation aids and no communication relays.


pages: 488 words: 145,950

The Ice at the End of the World: An Epic Journey Into Greenland's Buried Past and Our Perilous Future by Jon Gertner

American ideology, Charles Lindbergh, fear of failure, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), mass immigration, RAND corporation, risk tolerance, Silicon Valley, trade route

Meanwhile, his writing and informal diplomacy connected Greenland more closely to Denmark.41 In the process, his work had the ultimate effect of connecting Greenland more closely to the rest of the world. Partly he did this by bringing a number of social and physical scientists into his orbit and helping to introduce them to the world of ice and the Arctic. And partly he did this by the magnetic power of his celebrity, which in time prompted a variety of outsiders interested in Greenland—movie directors, U.S. military officers, even the aviator Charles Lindbergh—to seek him out. He did not do it alone, though. In 1908, while on vacation in Bergen, Norway, Rasmussen met a huge, handsome, good-natured man who was nearly a full foot taller and several years younger. Peter Freuchen, with unkempt hair and a full and ragged beard, was on his way back from Greenland, where he had been working for two years as a member of the Danmark expedition. In many respects, the Danmark group, which took its name from their sturdy ship, was the first endeavor that included scientists who aimed to investigate east Greenland’s meteorology, geology, and ice.


pages: 514 words: 153,092

The Forgotten Man by Amity Shlaes

anti-communist, bank run, banking crisis, Charles Lindbergh, collective bargaining, currency manipulation / currency intervention, Frederick Winslow Taylor, invisible hand, jobless men, Mahatma Gandhi, plutocrats, Plutocrats, short selling, Upton Sinclair, wage slave, Works Progress Administration

The Sutherland opinion fit in with Coolidge’s own general attitude, that the individual should have primacy—“All liberty is individual,” he had said in a speech in 1924. Coolidge’s personal wager about the 1920s was that the private sector would and should take the lead, and that then the possibilities for progress would be boundless. His reserve did not mean that he was not interested in modern technology. He followed Charles Lindbergh’s flights avidly, and the daughter of one of his closest friends, Dwight Morrow of Wall Street, would eventually marry Lindbergh. Citizens had proven their willingness to test Coolidge’s propositions again by voting overwhelmingly for the refrainer in 1924, despite the fact that he had been vice president to Warren Harding, whose short time in office had been clouded by scandal. At first, the differences between Coolidge and Hoover were nearly indistinguishable to the public eye.


pages: 501 words: 145,097

The Men Who United the States: America's Explorers, Inventors, Eccentrics and Mavericks, and the Creation of One Nation, Indivisible by Simon Winchester

British Empire, Charles Lindbergh, clean water, colonial rule, discovery of the americas, distributed generation, Donner party, estate planning, Etonian, full employment, Hernando de Soto, hive mind, invention of radio, invention of the telegraph, James Watt: steam engine, Joi Ito, Khyber Pass, Menlo Park, plutocrats, Plutocrats, transcontinental railway, Works Progress Administration

The standard appearance of the Interstate highways reflected his view that all roadside motels should be similar also, and he began planting them at busy intersections as fast as the roads were built. He had fifty Holiday Inns in 1958; ten years later, a thousand. * Aviation prizes did much to stimulate early flying. Lord Rothermere at the Daily Mail got fliers to cross the Channel and then the Atlantic; the owners of New York’s tony Brevoort Hotel and of the Bulova Watch Company both gave the prizes that were won by Charles Lindbergh when he reached Paris single-handed; and Tokyo’s newspaper Asahi Shimbun offered $50,000 for the first nonstop crossing of the Pacific. American fliers won the contest, but were paid only half because they were not Japanese. * The great French aristocrat who had played such a heroic role in the American War of Independence had returned to America as a distinguished graybeard a half century later to perform what was essentially a yearlong victory lap.


pages: 557 words: 159,434

Straight on Till Morning: The Life of Beryl Markham by Mary S. Lovell

British Empire, Charles Lindbergh, Etonian, out of africa

On her discharge from hospital, bolstered by renewed vigour which came from a combination of good diet and lots of mental stimulation, she spent the summer happily enough. Paddy Migdoll wrote regularly to me saying that Beryl was in better health than she had been for a long time. As the date of the fiftieth anniversary of her flight drew closer, plans were made by various bodies to celebrate the day. Beryl was almost the last of the great aviation figures in a line which had included Charles Lindbergh, Amelia Earhart, Wiley Post, Amy Johnson and Jim Mollison. At Abingdon, the Royal Air Force particularly wanted to mark the anniversary, and with the help of the original sponsors of Beryl’s flight, Smith’s Industries and Castrol, and surprisingly, the Province of Nova Scotia, they commissioned a bronze model of the Vega Gull. This they hoped could be presented to Beryl in person at Abingdon on the anniversary of the flight.


pages: 513 words: 154,427

Chief Engineer by Erica Wagner

Charles Lindbergh, Edmond Halley, index card, oil shale / tar sands, railway mania, Silicon Valley

Donald Roebling, John’s youngest son, removed the stained-glass window of the Brooklyn Bridge from the top of the staircase in 1936, and moved it to his estate in Florida; the place was restored in the early years of the twenty-first century, but the window, alas, seems to have disappeared. The year after Washington’s death—just a few days short of what would have been his ninetieth birthday—Charles Lindbergh’s Spirit of St. Louis landed at Le Bourget, in Paris, completing the world’s first solo transatlantic flight. The airplane’s control cables had been manufactured by John A. Roebling’s Sons Company; the plane was braced with Roebling wire, and its lighting and ignition cables had been made by the company, too: it constituted a new kind of bridge, thousands of miles long, stretched across a great ocean.


pages: 524 words: 155,947

More: The 10,000-Year Rise of the World Economy by Philip Coggan

"Robert Solow", accounting loophole / creative accounting, Ada Lovelace, agricultural Revolution, Airbnb, airline deregulation, Andrei Shleifer, anti-communist, assortative mating, autonomous vehicles, bank run, banking crisis, banks create money, basic income, Berlin Wall, Bob Noyce, Branko Milanovic, Bretton Woods, British Empire, business cycle, call centre, capital controls, carbon footprint, Carmen Reinhart, Celtic Tiger, central bank independence, Charles Lindbergh, clean water, collective bargaining, Columbian Exchange, Columbine, Corn Laws, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, crony capitalism, currency peg, debt deflation, Deng Xiaoping, discovery of the americas, Donald Trump, Erik Brynjolfsson, European colonialism, eurozone crisis, falling living standards, financial innovation, financial intermediation, floating exchange rates, Fractional reserve banking, Frederick Winslow Taylor, full employment, germ theory of disease, German hyperinflation, gig economy, Gini coefficient, global supply chain, global value chain, Gordon Gekko, greed is good, Haber-Bosch Process, Hans Rosling, Hernando de Soto, hydraulic fracturing, Ignaz Semmelweis: hand washing, income inequality, income per capita, indoor plumbing, industrial robot, inflation targeting, Isaac Newton, James Watt: steam engine, job automation, John Snow's cholera map, joint-stock company, joint-stock limited liability company, Kenneth Arrow, Kula ring, labour market flexibility, land reform, land tenure, Lao Tzu, large denomination, liquidity trap, Long Term Capital Management, Louis Blériot, low cost airline, low skilled workers, lump of labour, M-Pesa, Malcom McLean invented shipping containers, manufacturing employment, Marc Andreessen, Mark Zuckerberg, Martin Wolf, McJob, means of production, Mikhail Gorbachev, mittelstand, moral hazard, Murano, Venice glass, Myron Scholes, Nelson Mandela, Network effects, Northern Rock, oil shale / tar sands, oil shock, Paul Samuelson, popular capitalism, popular electronics, price stability, principal–agent problem, profit maximization, purchasing power parity, quantitative easing, railway mania, Ralph Nader, regulatory arbitrage, road to serfdom, Robert Gordon, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, Ronald Coase, Ronald Reagan, savings glut, Scramble for Africa, Second Machine Age, secular stagnation, Silicon Valley, Simon Kuznets, South China Sea, South Sea Bubble, special drawing rights, spice trade, spinning jenny, Steven Pinker, TaskRabbit, Thales and the olive presses, Thales of Miletus, The Great Moderation, The inhabitant of London could order by telephone, sipping his morning tea in bed, the various products of the whole earth, The Rise and Fall of American Growth, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, The Wisdom of Crowds, Thomas Malthus, Thorstein Veblen, trade route, transaction costs, transatlantic slave trade, transcontinental railway, Triangle Shirtwaist Factory, universal basic income, Unsafe at Any Speed, Upton Sinclair, V2 rocket, Veblen good, War on Poverty, Washington Consensus, Watson beat the top human players on Jeopardy!, women in the workforce, Yom Kippur War, zero-sum game

But after that, progress was rapid, with Louis Blériot crossing the Channel between France and England, a journey of around 31 miles, in July 1909. During the First World War, military men saw the potential for aeroplanes for reconnaissance, and the first fighter and bomber planes emerged. A commercial use for airlines wasn’t immediately obvious in the aftermath of the war. Early planes were not robust enough to carry passengers. But an airmail service was created after 1925, and Charles Lindbergh, having been the first man to fly across the Atlantic, piloted PanAm’s first service to South America in 1929. By the late 1930s, the DC-3 was large enough to seat 21 passengers. Shirley Temple, the Hollywood child star, was the first passenger to buy a sleeping ticket on a flight.52 Early airlines realised what Thomas Petzinger dubbed the “first rule of airline economics”: if a plane is going to take off anyway, any extra payload in the form of passengers or goods is almost pure profit.53 In the early years of commercial aviation, flying was seen as a glamorous business.


The Matter of the Heart: A History of the Heart in Eleven Operations by Thomas Morris

3D printing, Albert Einstein, Charles Lindbergh, experimental subject, Kickstarter, lateral thinking, meta analysis, meta-analysis, New Journalism, placebo effect, popular electronics, randomized controlled trial, stem cell

Though this was the first attempt to mimic the function of the natural heart, it was only ever intended to enable study on animal cadavers rather than sustain life, and aroused interest only among specialists. The perfusion pump unveiled in 1935 by two researchers in New York was, if anything, less sophisticated, yet it prompted a storm of publicity. Front-page headlines celebrated the invention of a ‘robot heart’, and fanciful claims were made about its likely application in humans. Fuelling this press hysteria was the identity of the pump’s inventor: Charles Lindbergh, revered for his feat in becoming the first solo pilot to fly the Atlantic nonstop. After the abduction and murder of his young son in 1932, Lindbergh had become a virtual recluse, and his sudden return to the public eye caused a sensation. For several years, it emerged, he had been quietly devoting himself to biological research at the Rockefeller Medical Center, assisting Alexis Carrel in his experiments.


pages: 2,323 words: 550,739

1,000 Places to See in the United States and Canada Before You Die, Updated Ed. by Patricia Schultz

Albert Einstein, Alfred Russel Wallace, American Society of Civil Engineers: Report Card, Bretton Woods, Burning Man, California gold rush, car-free, Charles Lindbergh, Columbine, Donald Trump, East Village, El Camino Real, estate planning, Frank Gehry, glass ceiling, Golden Gate Park, Guggenheim Bilbao, Haight Ashbury, haute cuisine, indoor plumbing, interchangeable parts, Mars Rover, Mason jar, Maui Hawaii, Mikhail Gorbachev, Murano, Venice glass, Nelson Mandela, new economy, New Urbanism, Norman Mailer, out of africa, Pepto Bismol, place-making, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Ronald Reagan, Rosa Parks, Saturday Night Live, sexual politics, South of Market, San Francisco, The Chicago School, transcontinental railway, traveling salesman, upwardly mobile, urban decay, urban planning, urban renewal, urban sprawl, wage slave, white picket fence, Works Progress Administration, Yogi Berra, éminence grise

The main Aviation Hangar, ten stories high and three football fields long, houses more than 100 aircraft, some on its main floor, others suspended from two hanging levels beside elevated overlooks. Highlights include a Concorde supersonic airliner; the Enola Gay, which dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima; and the only surviving Boeing 307 Stratoliner. There’s also a collection of 45 aircraft engines and more than 1,500 smaller artifacts such as uniforms, models, aerial cameras, and displays on famous aviators, including Charles Lindbergh and Amelia Earhart. Off to one side, the 53,000-square-foot James S. McDonnell Space Hangar houses the museum’s space collection, centered around the space shuttle Enterprise, the original test vehicle that initiated the shuttle program in 1976–77. It was originally to be named Constitution in honor of the U.S. Bicentennial, but the name was changed after 20,000 Star Trek fans wrote letters to President Gerald Ford.

Tel 202-707-5000 (general info) or 202-707-0919 (tour info); www.loc.gov. WHEN: closed Sun. BEST TIMES: Wed noon for free talks in the American Treasures gallery; evenings at the Madison Building’s Mary Pickford Theater for showings of films from the museum’s collection. The Final Frontier THE NATIONAL AIR AND SPACE MUSEUM Washington, D.C. For those in thrall with the notion of flight, this is your place. Under one roof you’ll find Charles Lindbergh’s Spirit of St. Louis, Chuck Yeager’s Glamorous Glennis Bell X-1, the Apollo 11 command module, the Skylab space station, and some moon rocks collected by Apollo 17. Orville and Wilbur Wright made history’s first manned flight in 1903, but the Smithsonian’s aeronautical collection actually predates that by 17 years, beginning with its 1876 acquisition of a group of Chinese kites. Today the museum’s facility on the National Mall houses 62 aircraft, 49 space vehicles and large artifacts, and more than 2,000 smaller pieces, and is the most visited museum in the world and an unrivaled hit with kids.

Designed in 1929 by noted local architect Albert Kahn, the home has interior paneling and furniture imported from old English manors; Cotswold roofers were brought in to split and lay the imported stone shingles. Evident throughout is the Fords’ love of art, though copies stand in for the originals now hanging in the Detroit Institute of the Arts (see p. 525). Much of this rich estate remains as it was when the Fords lived here, down to the framed photos of family and friends like Charles Lindbergh. Surprisingly, the least ostentatious home belonged to Henry Ford himself. Fair Lane, the 1914 estate of Henry and his wife, Clara, is remarkable for how well it reflects the inventive, detail-oriented mind of its owner. It is filled with technical innovations, including the powerhouse, designed with mentor Thomas Edison, which made the estate completely self-sufficient for heating, lighting, and refrigeration.


pages: 540 words: 168,921

The Relentless Revolution: A History of Capitalism by Joyce Appleby

1919 Motor Transport Corps convoy, agricultural Revolution, anti-communist, Asian financial crisis, asset-backed security, Bartolomé de las Casas, Bernie Madoff, Bretton Woods, BRICs, British Empire, call centre, Charles Lindbergh, collateralized debt obligation, collective bargaining, Columbian Exchange, commoditize, corporate governance, creative destruction, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, David Ricardo: comparative advantage, deindustrialization, Deng Xiaoping, deskilling, Doha Development Round, double entry bookkeeping, epigenetics, equal pay for equal work, European colonialism, facts on the ground, failed state, Firefox, fixed income, Ford paid five dollars a day, Francisco Pizarro, Frederick Winslow Taylor, full employment, Gordon Gekko, Henry Ford's grandson gave labor union leader Walter Reuther a tour of the company’s new, automated factory…, Hernando de Soto, hiring and firing, illegal immigration, informal economy, interchangeable parts, interest rate swap, invention of movable type, invention of the printing press, invention of the steam engine, invisible hand, Isaac Newton, James Hargreaves, James Watt: steam engine, Jeff Bezos, joint-stock company, Joseph Schumpeter, knowledge economy, land reform, Livingstone, I presume, Long Term Capital Management, Mahatma Gandhi, Martin Wolf, moral hazard, Parag Khanna, Ponzi scheme, profit maximization, profit motive, race to the bottom, Ralph Nader, refrigerator car, Ronald Reagan, Scramble for Africa, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, South China Sea, South Sea Bubble, special economic zone, spice trade, spinning jenny, strikebreaker, the built environment, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thomas L Friedman, Thorstein Veblen, total factor productivity, trade route, transatlantic slave trade, transcontinental railway, union organizing, Unsafe at Any Speed, Upton Sinclair, urban renewal, War on Poverty, working poor, Works Progress Administration, Yogi Berra, Yom Kippur War

Fund raising acquired a new importance in American politics. Once again, commerce showed its power to shape institutions in unexpected ways. Another newcomer to postwar American consumers was air travel. The U.S. government had promoted aeronautic research after the Wright brothers’ successful flight in 1903 but ceased to do so after World War I. The original airlines like American and United emerged from aircraft companies. Charles Lindbergh drew world attention in 1927, when he flew from New York to Paris in a single-engine monoplane. Lindbergh then became a pilot for Pan American, which, like the other pioneering, commercial airlines, relied on income from carrying the mail, especially to the countries of Latin America. During the 1930s fear and expense curbed commercial flying. One marketing effort to confront these obstacles boomeranged.


Frommer's San Diego 2011 by Mark Hiss

airport security, California gold rush, car-free, Charles Lindbergh, desegregation, Donald Trump, East Village, El Camino Real, glass ceiling, New Journalism, Norman Mailer, Skype, South of Market, San Francisco, sustainable-tourism, transcontinental railway, urban renewal, white picket fence, Works Progress Administration

In 1911, Aviator Glenn Hammond Curtiss established a flight school on Coronado’s North Island and invited the Army and Navy there to train for free. With the onset of World War I in 1917, the government purchased North Island, which by then had already been in use by the Army, Navy, and Marines. The Navy relocated its Pacific Fleet to San Diego in 1919. North Island’s aviation activity continued after the war, too, most famously when a young pilot named Charles Lindbergh hired San Diego’s Ryan Aeronautical Company to manufacture a special plane of his own design, called the Spirit of St. Louis. On May 10, 1927, Lindbergh left North Island for New York on a test flight, setting a transcontinental record in the process. Ten days later, he flew from New York to Paris, becoming the first pilot to make a solo nonstop flight across the Atlantic. San Diego’s airport, Lindbergh Field (p. 25), pays homage to the flying legend.


pages: 552 words: 168,518

MacroWikinomics: Rebooting Business and the World by Don Tapscott, Anthony D. Williams

accounting loophole / creative accounting, airport security, Andrew Keen, augmented reality, Ayatollah Khomeini, barriers to entry, Ben Horowitz, bioinformatics, Bretton Woods, business climate, business process, buy and hold, car-free, carbon footprint, Charles Lindbergh, citizen journalism, Clayton Christensen, clean water, Climategate, Climatic Research Unit, cloud computing, collaborative editing, collapse of Lehman Brothers, collateralized debt obligation, colonial rule, commoditize, corporate governance, corporate social responsibility, creative destruction, crowdsourcing, death of newspapers, demographic transition, disruptive innovation, distributed generation, don't be evil, en.wikipedia.org, energy security, energy transition, Exxon Valdez, failed state, fault tolerance, financial innovation, Galaxy Zoo, game design, global village, Google Earth, Hans Rosling, hive mind, Home mortgage interest deduction, information asymmetry, interchangeable parts, Internet of things, invention of movable type, Isaac Newton, James Watt: steam engine, Jaron Lanier, jimmy wales, Joseph Schumpeter, Julian Assange, Kevin Kelly, Kickstarter, knowledge economy, knowledge worker, Marc Andreessen, Marshall McLuhan, mass immigration, medical bankruptcy, megacity, mortgage tax deduction, Netflix Prize, new economy, Nicholas Carr, oil shock, old-boy network, online collectivism, open borders, open economy, pattern recognition, peer-to-peer lending, personalized medicine, Ray Kurzweil, RFID, ride hailing / ride sharing, Ronald Reagan, Rubik’s Cube, scientific mainstream, shareholder value, Silicon Valley, Skype, smart grid, smart meter, social graph, social web, software patent, Steve Jobs, text mining, the scientific method, The Wisdom of Crowds, transaction costs, transfer pricing, University of East Anglia, urban sprawl, value at risk, WikiLeaks, X Prize, young professional, Zipcar

The contest rules have three broad components: efficiency (cars must get at least 100 miles per gallon); emissions (cars must produce less than 200 grams of greenhouse gases per mile); and economic viability (mass production of the cars has to be feasible, and the company has to have a plan to make 10,000 a year).17 It’s this last point—that a winning vehicle has to be safe, comfortable, and ready to be mass-manufactured at a reasonable cost—that will separate the fantasy-mobiles from those that could actually be put into production and sold for a profit. “If we do this right,” says Diamandis, “we’re going to draw a line in the sand and say all the cars we drove before this date are relegated to the history museums.” Contests as an Innovation Model It’s not the first time high-profile contests have been used to motivate creative solutions to grand challenges. In 1927, Charles Lindbergh won the $25,000 Orteig Prize for flying nonstop from New York to Paris—a seminal event that helped launch the modern aviation industry. After Lindbergh’s nonstop solo flight across the Atlantic, the number of people who bought airplane tickets in the United States went from about 6,000 to 180,000 in eighteen months: a thirty-fold increase.18 The first X Prize, modeled after the Orteig Prize, captured the public’s attention in 2004, when the contest awarded $10 million to designer Burt Rutan and Microsoft cofounder Paul Allen for building the first privately funded spaceship that traveled 100 kilometers above the surface of the Earth.


pages: 710 words: 164,527

The Battle of Bretton Woods: John Maynard Keynes, Harry Dexter White, and the Making of a New World Order by Benn Steil

activist fund / activist shareholder / activist investor, Albert Einstein, Asian financial crisis, banks create money, Bretton Woods, British Empire, business cycle, capital controls, Charles Lindbergh, currency manipulation / currency intervention, currency peg, deindustrialization, European colonialism, facts on the ground, fiat currency, financial independence, floating exchange rates, full employment, global reserve currency, imperial preference, invisible hand, Isaac Newton, John Maynard Keynes: Economic Possibilities for our Grandchildren, Joseph Schumpeter, Kenneth Rogoff, lateral thinking, margin call, means of production, money: store of value / unit of account / medium of exchange, Monroe Doctrine, New Journalism, open economy, Paul Samuelson, Potemkin village, price mechanism, price stability, psychological pricing, reserve currency, road to serfdom, seigniorage, South China Sea, special drawing rights, The Great Moderation, the market place, trade liberalization, Works Progress Administration

Treasury Secretary, armed with figures prepared by White, testifying on the depths of British penury and speculating on what little might remain to be picked off the empire’s carcass in return for American support. Resistance to the plan was bolstered by the forced resignation of the U.S. ambassador to Britain, Joseph Kennedy, a hated figure in Downing Street, who admonished Congress that this was “not our war.” Charismatic aviation hero Charles Lindbergh also took up the opposition cause. “We are in danger of war today, not because Europeans attempted to interfere in our internal affairs,” Lindbergh insisted, “but because Americans attempted to interfere in the internal affairs of Europe.… If we desire peace, we need only stop asking for war.”11 Lend-Lease was widely painted as a measure likely to bankrupt America and drag it into a hopeless conflict remote from the nation’s vital interests.


pages: 526 words: 160,601

A Generation of Sociopaths: How the Baby Boomers Betrayed America by Bruce Cannon Gibney

1960s counterculture, 2013 Report for America's Infrastructure - American Society of Civil Engineers - 19 March 2013, affirmative action, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, American Society of Civil Engineers: Report Card, Bernie Madoff, Bernie Sanders, Bretton Woods, business cycle, buy and hold, carbon footprint, Charles Lindbergh, cognitive dissonance, collapse of Lehman Brothers, collateralized debt obligation, corporate personhood, Corrections Corporation of America, currency manipulation / currency intervention, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, dark matter, Deng Xiaoping, Donald Trump, Downton Abbey, Edward Snowden, Elon Musk, ending welfare as we know it, equal pay for equal work, failed state, financial deregulation, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, future of work, gender pay gap, gig economy, Haight Ashbury, Home mortgage interest deduction, Hyperloop, illegal immigration, impulse control, income inequality, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), invisible hand, Jane Jacobs, Kitchen Debate, labor-force participation, Long Term Capital Management, Lyft, Mark Zuckerberg, market bubble, mass immigration, mass incarceration, McMansion, medical bankruptcy, Menlo Park, Mont Pelerin Society, moral hazard, mortgage debt, mortgage tax deduction, neoliberal agenda, Network effects, obamacare, offshore financial centre, oil shock, operation paperclip, plutocrats, Plutocrats, Ponzi scheme, price stability, quantitative easing, Ralph Waldo Emerson, RAND corporation, rent control, ride hailing / ride sharing, risk tolerance, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, Ronald Reagan, Rubik’s Cube, school choice, secular stagnation, self-driving car, shareholder value, short selling, side project, Silicon Valley, smart grid, Snapchat, source of truth, stem cell, Steve Jobs, Stewart Brand, survivorship bias, TaskRabbit, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Tim Cook: Apple, too big to fail, War on Poverty, white picket fence, Whole Earth Catalog, women in the workforce, Y2K, Yom Kippur War, zero-sum game

Media of the age celebrated these accomplishments, in journals like Popular Science magazine, founded in 1872. In American cities, lectures on scientific topics, demonstrations of new inventions, and even public dissections were must-see events. The newspapers closely followed Thomas Edison, the “Wizard of Menlo Park,” and Americans prided themselves on his ingenuity. The Wright brothers, who invented the heavier-than-air plane, and Charles Lindbergh, the first person to fly solo across the Atlantic, also became celebrities and heroes (in the case of Lindbergh, notwithstanding his repellent personal views). There was not one Elon Musk, there were dozens. The stature of science and technology peaked in the two decades following World War II. In the American mind, the victories of science were literal and existential, with triumph over the Axis due in no small part to the contributions of the scientific and technical establishment, especially the Manhattan Project.


pages: 520 words: 164,834

Bill Marriott: Success Is Never Final--His Life and the Decisions That Built a Hotel Empire by Dale van Atta

Berlin Wall, Charles Lindbergh, clean water, collective bargaining, corporate raider, Deng Xiaoping, Donald Trump, dumpster diving, financial innovation, hiring and firing, index card, indoor plumbing, Kickstarter, Maui Hawaii, medical residency, Menlo Park, Mikhail Gorbachev, mortgage debt, profit motive, Robert Bork, Ronald Reagan, shareholder value, short selling, urban renewal

When Billy strode through the doors into the grand lobby with its twenty-one-foot-high colonnade of marble and gold, the Hotel Astor was the most popular meeting place on Broadway. In the center of the lobby was an ornate clock under which couples often met, and which was featured in a Judy Garland movie, The Clock. At the time of the Marriotts’ visit, the hotel was the temporary residence of several of the rich and famous, including Charles Lindbergh, Will Rogers, and Arturo Toscanini. Times Square never lost its allure for Bill, who returned two decades later in 1960 in the hope of opening a hotel there. At the time, he was chief of Marriott’s “Hotel Division,” overseeing a grand total of two hotels. He was thinking about buying the historic twenty-five-story Times Tower, built in 1904 as the headquarters of the fledgling New York Times.


pages: 1,540 words: 400,759

Fodor's California 2014 by Fodor's

1960s counterculture, active transport: walking or cycling, affirmative action, Asilomar, Bay Area Rapid Transit, big-box store, California gold rush, car-free, centre right, Charles Lindbergh, Chuck Templeton: OpenTable:, Donner party, Downton Abbey, East Village, El Camino Real, Frank Gehry, Golden Gate Park, Haight Ashbury, housing crisis, Kickstarter, Maui Hawaii, Mikhail Gorbachev, Ronald Reagan, Saturday Night Live, Silicon Valley, South of Market, San Francisco, trade route, transcontinental railway, urban renewal, urban sprawl, white picket fence, Works Progress Administration, young professional

In 1867 developer Alonzo Horton, who called the town’s bay front “the prettiest place for a city I ever saw,” began building a hotel, a plaza, and prefab homes on 960 Downtown acres. The city’s fate was sealed in 1908, when President Theodore Roosevelt’s Great White Fleet sailed into the bay. The U.S. Navy, impressed by the city’s excellent harbor and temperate climate, decided to build a destroyer base on San Diego Bay in the 1920s. The newly developed aircraft industry soon followed (Charles Lindbergh’s plane, Spirit of St. Louis, was built here). The military, which operates many bases and installations throughout the county (which, added together, form the largest military base in the world), continues to contribute to the local economy. Top Reasons to Go Beautiful beaches: San Diego’s shore shimmers with crystalline Pacific waters rolling up to some of the prettiest stretches of sand on the West Coast.

Coronado As if freeze-framed in the 1950s, Coronado’s quaint appeal is captured in its old-fashioned storefronts, well-manicured gardens, and charming Ferry Landing Marketplace. The streets of Coronado are wide, quiet, and friendly, and many of today’s residents live in grand Victorian homes handed down for generations. Naval Air Station North Island was established in 1911 on Coronado’s north end, across from Point Loma, and was the site of Charles Lindbergh’s departure on the transcontinental flight that preceded his famous solo flight across the Atlantic. Coronado’s long relationship with the U.S. Navy and its desirable real estate have made it an enclave for military personnel; it’s said to have more retired admirals per capita than anywhere else in the United States. Coronado is accessible via the arching blue 2.2-mile-long San Diego–Coronado Bay Bridge, which handles some 68,000 cars each day.


pages: 812 words: 180,057

The Generals: American Military Command From World War II to Today by Thomas E. Ricks

affirmative action, airport security, amateurs talk tactics, professionals talk logistics, Charles Lindbergh, Columbine, continuation of politics by other means, cuban missile crisis, hiring and firing, MITM: man-in-the-middle, RAND corporation, Ronald Reagan, South China Sea, Yom Kippur War

MacArthur privately told Ridgway that Truman was an unhealthy, confused man, suffering from “mental illness.” Truman, for his part, later said that there were times when MacArthur was “out of his head and didn’t know what he was doing.” MacArthur returned home to the welcome of a conquering hero. He was given one parade in Honolulu, two each in San Francisco and Washington, and a final triumph in New York City, bigger than that given for Charles Lindbergh. He addressed a joint session of Congress and used it to accuse the Truman Administration of appeasement of Communism and “defeatism.” It was time to take on China, he said, though he pulled his punches a bit and did not call for bombing of its air bases, as he had recommended internally. If the United States did not prevent a Communist takeover of Taiwan, he added, then it might well start think about defending itself “on the coast of California, Oregon, and Washington.”


Carrying the Fire: An Astronaut's Journeys: 50th Anniversary Edition by Michael Collins, Charles A. Lindbergh

Charles Lindbergh, Colonization of Mars, Elon Musk, Isaac Newton, Jeff Bezos, orbital mechanics / astrodynamics, place-making, Ralph Waldo Emerson, RAND corporation, the medium is the message

The most unusual telegram reads: “… Thirty-five years ago in our home, on July 21, 1934, we heard firsthand from our father of the adventures of Buck Rogers in his first flight to the moon. Father, Phil Nowland, originated the comic strip ‘Buck Rogers’ on that date. Walking on the moon was commonplace to us at Maple Avenue in Bala-Cynwyd, Pennsylvania, but it was a thrill and exciting to all of us to watch your flight into space, Buck Rogers finally coming to life. Our Best Wishes, the children of Phillip Nowland.” Most impressive of all is the letter from Charles Lindbergh, written on Pan American Flight 841 from Honolulu to Manila, and postmarked in Manila on July 28. Dear Colonel Collins, My congratulations to you on your fascinating, extraordinary, and beautifully executed mission; and my sincere thanks for the part you took in issuing the invitation that permitted me to watch your Apollo 11 launching from the location assigned to Astronauts. (There would have been constant distractions for me in the area with VIPs, among whom I refuse to class myself—what a terrible designation!)


pages: 1,048 words: 187,324

Atlas Obscura: An Explorer's Guide to the World's Hidden Wonders by Joshua Foer, Dylan Thuras, Ella Morton

anti-communist, Berlin Wall, British Empire, Buckminster Fuller, centre right, Charles Lindbergh, colonial rule, Colonization of Mars, cosmic microwave background, cuban missile crisis, dark matter, double helix, East Village, Exxon Valdez, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Frank Gehry, germ theory of disease, Golden Gate Park, Google Earth, Haight Ashbury, horn antenna, Ignaz Semmelweis: hand washing, index card, Jacques de Vaucanson, Kowloon Walled City, Louis Pasteur, low cost airline, Mahatma Gandhi, mass immigration, mutually assured destruction, Panopticon Jeremy Bentham, phenotype, Pluto: dwarf planet, Ronald Reagan, Rubik’s Cube, Sapir-Whorf hypothesis, Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, trade route, transatlantic slave trade, transcontinental railway, Tunguska event, urban sprawl, Vesna Vulović, white picket fence, wikimedia commons, working poor

When it came time to furnish the house, Stenman continued the newspaper theme, rolling papers into tiny logs, stacking them to form chairs, bookcases, and desks, and sloshing varnish on top for a lacquered wood effect. Stenman spent summers in his newspaper house until 1930, after which the place opened to the public as a museum. Look through the layers of shellac and you’ll see headlines and tales from the 1920s, including, on one desk, accounts of Charles Lindbergh’s pioneering transatlantic flight. 52 Pigeon Hill Street, Rockport. The house is around 40 miles (64 km) northeast of Boston, in the coastal town of Rockport. It’s open from spring through fall. 42.672947 70.634617 Even the furniture is made of rolled-up newspapers. NEW HAMPSHIRE America’s Stonehenge SALEM The name of this place sets you up for disappointment—it’s nothing like the original.


pages: 714 words: 188,602

Persian Gulf Command: A History of the Second World War in Iran and Iraq by Ashley Jackson

British Empire, Charles Lindbergh, colonial rule, fixed income, full employment, out of africa, the built environment

The Iranian prime minister ‘stated he wishes to have a complete American military mission to reorganize and train the Army which is demoralized, inefficient, depleted in materials and almost disintegrated as a result of the invasion of the country’.26 American experts also advised on police administration, irrigation, agricultural education and public health. By far the most successful mission was that of Colonel H. Norman Schwarzkopf, a former chief of the New Jersey State Police who had led the investigation into the kidnapping of Charles Lindbergh’s son, and who was the father of ‘Stormin’ Norman, of later Gulf War fame. Renowned as ‘a gang-smasher’, Schwarzkopf was sent to Iran to reorganize the gendarmerie and improve security on the all-important road network, reorganizing and retraining a force of 20,000 men under a US Army mandate.27 The force trained by Schwarzkopf would later be instrumental in suppressing autonomous movements in Azerbaijan and Kurdistan.28 The main American mission was undoubtedly that responsible for financial reconstruction.


The Splendid and the Vile: A Saga of Churchill, Family, and Defiance During the Blitz by Erik Larson

Albert Einstein, British Empire, Charles Lindbergh, plutocrats, Plutocrats, traveling salesman, union organizing, Works Progress Administration

A Gallup Poll released on September 3 showed that 51 percent of Americans favored Roosevelt in the upcoming election; 49 percent preferred Wendell Willkie. Given margins of error in polling, the two candidates were running neck and neck. But in America, the tilt toward isolationism was gaining momentum and intensity. On September 4, a group of Yale Law students founded the America First Committee to oppose involvement in the war. The organization grew quickly, winning the energetic support of no less a celebrity than Charles Lindbergh, a national hero ever since his 1927 flight across the Atlantic. And Willkie, urged by Republican leaders to do whatever he could to pull ahead in the presidential election, was about to change strategy and make the war—and fear—the central issue in the campaign. CHAPTER 41 He Is Coming ON WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, HITLER stepped to the rostrum at the Berlin Sportpalast, where some years earlier he had made his first speech as chancellor of Germany.


pages: 769 words: 397,677

Frommer's California 2007 by Harry Basch, Mark Hiss, Erika Lenkert, Matthew Richard Poole

airport security, Asilomar, Bay Area Rapid Transit, car-free, Charles Lindbergh, Chuck Templeton: OpenTable:, clean water, Columbine, Donald Trump, Donner party, East Village, El Camino Real, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, Frank Gehry, Golden Gate Park, Guggenheim Bilbao, Haight Ashbury, indoor plumbing, Iridium satellite, Joan Didion, Maui Hawaii, Silicon Valley, South of Market, San Francisco, sustainable-tourism, transcontinental railway, upwardly mobile, urban sprawl, white picket fence, Works Progress Administration

The Hollywood crowd would take Hearst’s private railway car from Los Angeles to San Luis Obispo, where a fleet of limousines waited to transport them to San Simeon. Those who didn’t come by train were treated to a flight on Hearst’s private plane from the Burbank airport (MGM head Irving Thalberg and his wife, Norma Shearer, preferred this mode of transportation). Hearst, an avid aviator, had a landing strip built; Charles Lindbergh used it when he flew up for a visit in the summer of 1928. Oh, if the walls could talk. Atop one of the castle towers are the hexagonal Celestial Suites. One was a favorite of Clark Gable and Carole Lombard, who would be startled out of their romantic slumber by the clamor of 18 carillon bells overhead. David Niven, a frequent guest, was one of the many who defied Hearst’s edict against liquor in private rooms: Niven was called upon more than once to explain the “empties” under the bed (once owned by Cardinal Richelieu) in his customary suite.

Will Rogers State Historic Park Will Rogers State Historic Park was once Will Rogers’s private ranch and grounds. Willed to California in 1944, the 168-acre estate is now a park and historic site, supervised by the Department of Parks and Recreation. Visitors may explore the grounds, the former stables, and the 31-room house with original furnishings, including a porch swing in the living room and Native American rugs and baskets. Charles Lindbergh and his wife, Anne Morrow Lindbergh, hid here in the 1930s during the craze that followed the kidnap and murder of their first son. There are picnic tables, but no food is sold. Who’s Will Rogers, you ask? He was born in Oklahoma in 1879 and became a cowboy in the Texas Panhandle before drifting into a Wild West show as a folksy, speechifying roper. The “cracker-barrel philosopher” performed lariat tricks while carrying on a humorous deadpan monologue on current events.


pages: 677 words: 206,548

Future Crimes: Everything Is Connected, Everyone Is Vulnerable and What We Can Do About It by Marc Goodman

23andMe, 3D printing, active measures, additive manufacturing, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Airbnb, airport security, Albert Einstein, algorithmic trading, artificial general intelligence, Asilomar, Asilomar Conference on Recombinant DNA, augmented reality, autonomous vehicles, Baxter: Rethink Robotics, Bill Joy: nanobots, bitcoin, Black Swan, blockchain, borderless world, Brian Krebs, business process, butterfly effect, call centre, Charles Lindbergh, Chelsea Manning, cloud computing, cognitive dissonance, computer vision, connected car, corporate governance, crowdsourcing, cryptocurrency, data acquisition, data is the new oil, Dean Kamen, disintermediation, don't be evil, double helix, Downton Abbey, drone strike, Edward Snowden, Elon Musk, Erik Brynjolfsson, Filter Bubble, Firefox, Flash crash, future of work, game design, global pandemic, Google Chrome, Google Earth, Google Glasses, Gordon Gekko, high net worth, High speed trading, hive mind, Howard Rheingold, hypertext link, illegal immigration, impulse control, industrial robot, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Internet of things, Jaron Lanier, Jeff Bezos, job automation, John Harrison: Longitude, John Markoff, Joi Ito, Jony Ive, Julian Assange, Kevin Kelly, Khan Academy, Kickstarter, knowledge worker, Kuwabatake Sanjuro: assassination market, Law of Accelerating Returns, Lean Startup, license plate recognition, lifelogging, litecoin, low earth orbit, M-Pesa, Mark Zuckerberg, Marshall McLuhan, Menlo Park, Metcalfe’s law, MITM: man-in-the-middle, mobile money, more computing power than Apollo, move fast and break things, move fast and break things, Nate Silver, national security letter, natural language processing, obamacare, Occupy movement, Oculus Rift, off grid, offshore financial centre, optical character recognition, Parag Khanna, pattern recognition, peer-to-peer, personalized medicine, Peter H. Diamandis: Planetary Resources, Peter Thiel, pre–internet, RAND corporation, ransomware, Ray Kurzweil, refrigerator car, RFID, ride hailing / ride sharing, Rodney Brooks, Ross Ulbricht, Satoshi Nakamoto, Second Machine Age, security theater, self-driving car, shareholder value, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, Skype, smart cities, smart grid, smart meter, Snapchat, social graph, software as a service, speech recognition, stealth mode startup, Stephen Hawking, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, strong AI, Stuxnet, supply-chain management, technological singularity, telepresence, telepresence robot, Tesla Model S, The Future of Employment, The Wisdom of Crowds, Tim Cook: Apple, trade route, uranium enrichment, Wall-E, Watson beat the top human players on Jeopardy!, Wave and Pay, We are Anonymous. We are Legion, web application, Westphalian system, WikiLeaks, Y Combinator, zero day

By an act of Parliament, the British government offered £20,000 (more than £1 million today) for a solution that could find longitude to within half a degree. The incentive prize inspired John Harrison, a self-educated working-class clock maker, to invent the marine chronometer, a clocklike device that solved the problem. Two hundred years later, another incentive prize was launched, this time to stimulate advances in the nascent field of aviation. Charles Lindbergh became the first man to fly across the Atlantic, not just because of his sense of adventure, but because a seldom-recalled hotel magnate named Raymond Orteig offered $25,000 of his own money in 1919 as a prize to “the first aviator of any Allied Country crossing the Atlantic in one flight, from Paris to New York or New York to Paris.” Orteig offered the purse to drive forward an exciting new technology of his day: the flying machine.


pages: 588 words: 193,087

And Here's the Kicker: Conversations with 21 Top Humor Writers on Their Craft by Mike Sacks

Albert Einstein, Charles Lindbergh, Columbine, Donald Trump, Exxon Valdez, fear of failure, game design, illegal immigration, In Cold Blood by Truman Capote, index card, Joan Didion, Norman Mailer, out of africa, pre–internet, Ronald Reagan, Saturday Night Live, upwardly mobile

And if you're up onstage every night for a year, or two years, or three years, with the audience yelling suggestions at you like “Do Chekhov, but do it with Chinese characters,” you get used to an immediate commitment to lunatic ideas. You gain a confidence. Most of the SNL cast members came from that background. You played one of the more bizarre and lecherous characters on the show, Uncle Roy, the middle-aged pedophile babysitter. I wonder how many guest hosts today would ever play such a role. He wasn't the only creepy character I played. I played Charles Lindbergh crossing the Atlantic and jerking off to a pornographic magazine. I welcomed the weirdness of that sketch and others. I don't think you could do a sketch like “Uncle Roy” these days. I think one of the reasons why it worked was because the two little-girl characters, played by Gilda and Laraine Newman, love their Uncle Roy in the nicest possible way. The games they play are great fun to them.


pages: 612 words: 206,792

The Mask of Sanity: An Attempt to Clarify Some Issues About the So Called Psychopathic Personality by Hervey Cleckley

Charles Lindbergh, financial independence, Mason jar, traveling salesman

Telephone calls from newspapermen and from people connected with the American embassy, his parents report, confirm this and indicate that Stanley must have created a remarkable stir and a great deal of confusion. His own report, which can hardly be counted upon as accurate or trustworthy, pictures him as being hailed and feted in Brussels in a style and on a scale almost comparable to the welcome Charles Lindbergh received in New York after his historic solo first airplane flight across the Atlantic ocean. This account of Stanley began with headlines from a newspaper. It seems to me appropriate to close the report with another small item of news that appeared in 1975 in a local paper. “PREACHER” BLESSES AUGUSTAN’S WALLET, COLLECTS $175 FEE An agreeable young man who identified himself as a “preacher” blessed an Augusta man’s wallet Tuesday and collected a $175 fee.


pages: 760 words: 218,087

The Pentagon: A History by Steve Vogel

Berlin Wall, Charles Lindbergh, City Beautiful movement, cuban missile crisis, East Village, Fall of the Berlin Wall, New Journalism, Norman Mailer, Ronald Reagan, Works Progress Administration

Actor Clark Gable, then a captain in the Army Air Forces, nearly brought the Pentagon to a standstill. “His appearance upset the work of hundreds of War Department women workers who swarmed out of their offices, ignored the shouts of federal policemen to ‘keep moving,’ and sighed as the former actor hurried through the halls,” The New York Times reported. Famous faces—Bob Hope, Cary Grant, and Charles Lindbergh among them—were spotted coming through the River entrance. Eleanor Roosevelt had a special pass allowing her to enter without challenge, but Vienna-born Supreme Court Justice Felix Frankfurter, late for an appointment with Stimson, was given the treatment by a suspicious receptionist. “That man was born in Austria,” the receptionist remarked to the next visitor. “You can’t be too careful these days.”


pages: 356 words: 186,629

Frommer's Los Angeles 2010 by Matthew Richard Poole

call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, Charles Lindbergh, clean water, Donald Trump, El Camino Real, Frank Gehry, Guggenheim Bilbao, Haight Ashbury, Joan Didion, Maui Hawaii, Saturday Night Live, sustainable-tourism, upwardly mobile

W H AT TO S E E & D O I N LO S A N G E L E S 188 Will Rogers State Historic Park Will Rogers willed his private ranch and grounds to the state of California in 1944, and the 168-acr e estate is no w both a par k and a historic site. Visitors may explor e the grounds, the former stables, and the 31-r oom house filled with the original furnishings, including a porch swing in the living room and many Native American rugs and baskets. Charles Lindbergh and his wife, Anne M orrow Lindbergh, hid out her e in the 1930s during part of the craze that followed the kidnapping and murder of their first son. There are picnic tables, but no food is sold. Who’s Will Rogers, you ask? He was born in Oklahoma in 1879 and became a cowboy in the Texas Panhandle before drifting into a Wild West show as a folksy , speechifying roper. The “ cracker-barrel philosopher ” per formed lariat tricks while carr ying on a humorous deadpan monologue on curr ent events.


pages: 669 words: 210,153

Tools of Titans: The Tactics, Routines, and Habits of Billionaires, Icons, and World-Class Performers by Timothy Ferriss

Airbnb, Alexander Shulgin, artificial general intelligence, asset allocation, Atul Gawande, augmented reality, back-to-the-land, Ben Horowitz, Bernie Madoff, Bertrand Russell: In Praise of Idleness, Black Swan, blue-collar work, Boris Johnson, Buckminster Fuller, business process, Cal Newport, call centre, Charles Lindbergh, Checklist Manifesto, cognitive bias, cognitive dissonance, Colonization of Mars, Columbine, commoditize, correlation does not imply causation, David Brooks, David Graeber, diversification, diversified portfolio, Donald Trump, effective altruism, Elon Musk, fault tolerance, fear of failure, Firefox, follow your passion, future of work, Google X / Alphabet X, Howard Zinn, Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall, Jeff Bezos, job satisfaction, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, John Markoff, Kevin Kelly, Kickstarter, Lao Tzu, lateral thinking, life extension, lifelogging, Mahatma Gandhi, Marc Andreessen, Mark Zuckerberg, Mason jar, Menlo Park, Mikhail Gorbachev, MITM: man-in-the-middle, Nelson Mandela, Nicholas Carr, optical character recognition, PageRank, passive income, pattern recognition, Paul Graham, peer-to-peer, Peter H. Diamandis: Planetary Resources, Peter Singer: altruism, Peter Thiel, phenotype, PIHKAL and TIHKAL, post scarcity, post-work, premature optimization, QWERTY keyboard, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Ray Kurzweil, recommendation engine, rent-seeking, Richard Feynman, risk tolerance, Ronald Reagan, selection bias, sharing economy, side project, Silicon Valley, skunkworks, Skype, Snapchat, social graph, software as a service, software is eating the world, stem cell, Stephen Hawking, Steve Jobs, Stewart Brand, superintelligent machines, Tesla Model S, The Wisdom of Crowds, Thomas L Friedman, Wall-E, Washington Consensus, Whole Earth Catalog, Y Combinator, zero-sum game

Lewis), Cancer as a Metabolic Disease: On the Origin, Management, and Prevention of Cancer (Thomas Seyfried), Ketogenic Diabetes Diet: Type 2 Diabetes (Ellen Davis, MS, and Keith Runyan, MD), Fight Cancer with a Ketogenic Diet (Ellen Davis, MS) de Botton, Alain: The Unbearable Lightness of Being (Milan Kundera), The Complete Essays (Michel de Montaigne), In Search of Lost Time (Marcel Proust) De Sena, Joe: A Message to Garcia (Elbert Hubbard), Atlas Shrugged (Ayn Rand), Shōgun (James Clavell), The One Minute Manager (Kenneth H. Blanchard) Diamandis, Peter: The Spirit of St. Louis (Charles Lindbergh), The Man Who Sold the Moon (Robert A. Heinlein), The Singularity Is Near (Ray Kurzweil), Atlas Shrugged (Ayn Rand), Stone Soup story DiNunzio, Tracy: Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap . . . and Others Don’t (Jim Collins), The Everything Store: Jeff Bezos and the Age of Amazon (Brad Stone) Dubner, Stephen: For adults: Levels of the Game (John McPhee); for kids: The Empty Pot (Demi) Eisen, Jonathan: National Geographic Field Guide to the Birds of North America (Jon L.


Frommer's California 2009 by Matthew Poole, Harry Basch, Mark Hiss, Erika Lenkert

airport security, Asilomar, Bay Area Rapid Transit, California gold rush, call centre, car-free, Charles Lindbergh, clean water, Columbine, Donald Trump, Donner party, East Village, El Camino Real, European colonialism, Frank Gehry, Golden Gate Park, Haight Ashbury, housing crisis, indoor plumbing, Joan Didion, Mason jar, mass immigration, Maui Hawaii, post-work, Saturday Night Live, Silicon Valley, Skype, South of Market, San Francisco, sustainable-tourism, transcontinental railway, urban sprawl, white picket fence, Works Progress Administration, Y Combinator

The Holly wood cr owd w ould take Hearst’s private railway car from Los Angeles to San Luis Obispo, where a fleet of limousines wait ed to transport them to San Simeon. Those who didn’t come by train w ere treated to a flight on Hearst ’s private plane fr om the Burbank airport (MGM head Irving Thalberg and his wife, Norma Shearer, preferred this mode of transpor tation). Hearst, an a vid aviator, had a landing strip built; Charles Lindbergh used it when he flew up f or a visit in the summer of 1928. Oh, if the walls c ould talk. Atop one of the castle t owers are the hexagonal Celestial Suit es. One was a fa vorite of Clark G able and C arole Lombard, who would be star tled out of their r omantic slumber b y the clamor of 18 carillon bells o verhead. Da vid N iven, a fr equent guest, was one of the man y who defied Hearst ’s edic t against liquor in privat e r ooms: N iven was called upon more than onc e t o explain the “empties” under the bed (onc e o wned b y Cardinal R ichelieu) in his cust omary suit e. 430 wine accessories, and gifts, plus Wine Country gourmet goodies open for tasting.

Will Rogers Sta te Historic P ark Will R ogers State H istoric Park was once Will Rogers’s private ranch and gr ounds. Willed to the state of California in 1944, the 168acre estate is now both a park and a historic site, supervised by the Department of Parks and Recreation. Visitors may explore the grounds, the former stables, and the 31-r oom house filled with the original furnishings, including a porch swing in the living room and many Native American rugs and baskets. Charles Lindbergh and his wife, Anne Morrow Lindbergh, hid out her e in the 1930s during par t of the craz e that followed the kidnap and murder of their first son. There are picnic tables, but no food is sold. Guided Ranch House tours are available as well. Who’s Will Rogers, you ask? He was born in Oklahoma in 1879 and became a cowboy in the Texas Panhandle before drifting into a Wild West show as a folksy , speechifying 559 Value F ree Culture To beef up att endance and g ive indigent f olk like us tra vel writ ers a br eak, almost all of L.A. ’s ar t galleries and museums ar e open fr ee t o the public 1 day of the w eek or month (or both), and sev eral char ge no admission.


pages: 797 words: 227,399

Wired for War: The Robotics Revolution and Conflict in the 21st Century by P. W. Singer

agricultural Revolution, Albert Einstein, Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic, Atahualpa, barriers to entry, Berlin Wall, Bill Joy: nanobots, blue-collar work, borderless world, Charles Lindbergh, clean water, Craig Reynolds: boids flock, cuban missile crisis, digital map, en.wikipedia.org, Ernest Rutherford, failed state, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Firefox, Francisco Pizarro, Frank Gehry, friendly fire, game design, George Gilder, Google Earth, Grace Hopper, I think there is a world market for maybe five computers, if you build it, they will come, illegal immigration, industrial robot, interchangeable parts, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), invention of gunpowder, invention of movable type, invention of the steam engine, Isaac Newton, Jacques de Vaucanson, job automation, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Law of Accelerating Returns, Mars Rover, Menlo Park, New Urbanism, pattern recognition, private military company, RAND corporation, Ray Kurzweil, RFID, robot derives from the Czech word robota Czech, meaning slave, Rodney Brooks, Ronald Reagan, Schrödinger's Cat, Silicon Valley, social intelligence, speech recognition, Stephen Hawking, strong AI, technological singularity, The Coming Technological Singularity, The Wisdom of Crowds, Turing test, Vernor Vinge, Wall-E, Yogi Berra

When asked about his thoughts on the implications of arming robots, for example, Brian Miller, our NASCAR engineer turned roboticist, simply responds, “I stay out of politics.” Likewise, Sebastian Thrun pointedly changes the subject when the topic of the political impact of his research comes up. “I am ignoring all of this to build this vehicle.” He says he just focuses on the path of invention and discovery and compares his work to Charles Lindbergh’s preparations for the first flight across the Atlantic. “He didn’t do it thinking about all the regulations for transatlantic passenger travel it would inspire. He just did it.” It is not that the researchers don’t realize there are big issues at hand; indeed, the idea of having a major impact is what drives many of them to robotics research, as opposed to any of the other scientific fields in which they would thrive.


pages: 756 words: 228,797

Ayn Rand and the World She Made by Anne C. Heller

affirmative action, Albert Einstein, American ideology, anti-communist, Bolshevik threat, Charles Lindbergh, conceptual framework, greed is good, laissez-faire capitalism, Milgram experiment, money market fund, Mont Pelerin Society, New Journalism, open borders, price stability, profit motive, rent control, rolodex, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, the scientific method, theory of mind, Thorstein Veblen, transcontinental railway, upwardly mobile, wage slave, War on Poverty, Works Progress Administration, young professional

This, of course, echoes the ending of Atlas Shrugged, except that there the novel’s hero, John Galt, refuses to help the socialistic villains and instead flies his plane to a self-sustaining miniature world hidden in the Rocky Mountains; there he waits for the incompetent “looters and moochers” to perish of their own incompetence. Although Rand used many of the same ideas and motifs in both narratives, by the 1950s she appeared to be less hopeful that minds can be changed, villains converted, and mankind in general saved; a sealed world became her only answer. It’s remarkable that this story is set aboard an airplane, let alone one that orbits the earth. If Rand’s memory is correct, she wrote it four years before Charles Lindbergh crossed the Atlantic Ocean. The explanation may lie in an influence she never publicly spoke of: the stories and novels of a few then-famous Russian futurist and surrealist writers who lived in St. Petersburg in the early 1920s and made their names by envisioning the utopian, and anti-utopian, potential of the decade’s new machines. Rand’s 1938 novel, Anthem, clearly reflects their influence, and so, perhaps, did this early effort.


pages: 788 words: 223,004

Merchants of Truth: The Business of News and the Fight for Facts by Jill Abramson

23andMe, 4chan, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Alexander Shulgin, Apple's 1984 Super Bowl advert, barriers to entry, Bernie Madoff, Bernie Sanders, Charles Lindbergh, Chelsea Manning, citizen journalism, cloud computing, commoditize, corporate governance, creative destruction, crowdsourcing, death of newspapers, digital twin, diversified portfolio, Donald Trump, East Village, Edward Snowden, Ferguson, Missouri, Filter Bubble, future of journalism, glass ceiling, Google Glasses, haute couture, hive mind, income inequality, information asymmetry, invisible hand, Jeff Bezos, Joseph Schumpeter, Khyber Pass, late capitalism, Marc Andreessen, Mark Zuckerberg, move fast and break things, move fast and break things, Nate Silver, new economy, obamacare, Occupy movement, performance metric, Peter Thiel, phenotype, pre–internet, race to the bottom, recommendation engine, Robert Mercer, Ronald Reagan, Saturday Night Live, self-driving car, sentiment analysis, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley ideology, Silicon Valley startup, skunkworks, Snapchat, social intelligence, social web, Steve Jobs, Steven Levy, technoutopianism, telemarketer, the scientific method, The Wisdom of Crowds, Tim Cook: Apple, too big to fail, WikiLeaks

In that boisterous age, presses roared in the basement of the Times Building (the namesake of Times Square), typewriters clacked, and bookies ran in and out of the newsroom. Next to Sulzberger’s office was the imposing boardroom dominated by a huge mahogany table and walls that were covered with signed portraits of dignitaries who had visited the offices, including several American presidents, Charlie Chaplin, Charles Lindbergh, and an array of foreign leaders. There were so many that there was a special book in the room to identify them. President Hamid Karzai of Afghanistan and Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice had been recent guests at sessions where Sulzberger introduced them, then handed them over for questioning by the journalists on his editorial board. Sulzberger would occasionally attend the front-page meeting, but only rarely and without ever commenting on the stories editors pitched for the six precious spots on A1 of the next day’s paper.


The Rough Guide to New York City by Martin Dunford

Anton Chekhov, Berlin Wall, Bonfire of the Vanities, Buckminster Fuller, buttonwood tree, car-free, Charles Lindbergh, Chuck Templeton: OpenTable:, clean water, colonial exploitation, colonial rule, desegregation, Donald Trump, East Village, Edward Thorp, Exxon Valdez, Frank Gehry, glass ceiling, haute cuisine, illegal immigration, Jane Jacobs, market bubble, Norman Mailer, paper trading, post-work, Saturday Night Live, sustainable-tourism, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, the High Line, transcontinental railway, Triangle Shirtwaist Factory, upwardly mobile, urban decay, urban planning, urban renewal, white flight, Yogi Berra, young professional

Its front and sides are gleaming white marble, but the back of the building, which faces north, is dull red sandstone – allegedly because the architects couldn’t imagine anyone peering around behind the structure, which was built when this area was at the farthest north fringe of the city. The building’s first moment of fame came in 1865 when Abraham Lincoln’s body lay in state here for 120,000 sorrowful New Yorkers to file past. In 1927, the city feted aviator Charles Lindbergh, lately returned from Paris, and the building became the traditional finishing point for tickertape parades down Broadway, over time honoring everyone from astronauts to returned hostages to championship-winning teams. An elegant meeting of arrogance and authority, the building, with its sweeping interior spiral staircase and fine collections of nineteenth-century American art and furnishings, has unfortunately been closed to individual visitors since the July 2003 shooting of City Councilman James E.


Without Remorse by Tom Clancy

Charles Lindbergh, defense in depth, South China Sea

His crew station allowed him to turn and look out a small porthole to inspect his bird visually, which he did even though there was no real reason to do so. The sergeant loved the things as a child will love a particularly entertaining toy. He'd worked with the drone program for ten years, and this particular one he had flown sixty-one times. That was a record for the area. Cody-193 had a distinguished ancestry. Its manufacturers, Teledyne-Ryan of San Diego, California, had built Charles Lindbergh's Spirit of St Louis, but the company had never quite managed to cash in on that bit of aviation history. Struggling from one small contract to another, it had finally achieved financial stability by making targets. Fighter aircraft had to practice shooting at something. The Firebee drone had begun life as just that, a miniature jet aircraft whose mission was to die gloriously at the hands of a fighter pilot - except that the sergeant had never quite seen things that way.


Western USA by Lonely Planet

airport security, Albert Einstein, Apple II, Asilomar, back-to-the-land, Bay Area Rapid Transit, Burning Man, California gold rush, call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, Charles Lindbergh, Chuck Templeton: OpenTable:, Donner party, East Village, edge city, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, Frank Gehry, global village, Golden Gate Park, Haight Ashbury, haute couture, haute cuisine, illegal immigration, intermodal, Joan Didion, Kickstarter, Loma Prieta earthquake, Mahatma Gandhi, Mars Rover, Maui Hawaii, off grid, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, South of Market, San Francisco, starchitect, stealth mode startup, stem cell, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, supervolcano, trade route, transcontinental railway, Upton Sinclair, urban planning, women in the workforce, Works Progress Administration, young professional, Zipcar

San Diego Automotive Museum MUSEUM ( 619-231-2886; www.sdautomuseum.org; 2080 Pan-American Plaza; adult/child $8/4; 10am-5pm) Buildings around Pan- American Plaza in the park’s southern section date from the 1935 Pacific-California Exposition. It’s all about polished chrome and cool tailfins at this museum. San Diego Air & Space Museum MUSEUM ( 619-234-8291; www.sandiegoairandspace.org; adult/child $16.50/6; 10am-5:30pm Jun-Aug, to 4:30pm Sep-May) Highlights include an original Blackbird SR-71 spy plane and a replica of Charles Lindbergh’s Spirit of St Louis, as well as simulators that require an extra charge. San Diego Museum of Art MUSEUM ( 619-232-7931; www.sdmart.org; 1450 El Prado, Plaza de Panama; adult/child $12/4.50; 10am-5pm Tue-Sat, from noon Sun, to 9pm Thu Jun-Sep) Gets accolades for its European old masters and good collections of American and Asian art. Mingei International Museum MUSEUM ( 619-239-0003; www.mingei.org; 1439 El Prado, Plaza de Panama; adult/child $7/4; 10am-4pm Tue-Sun) Exhibits folk art from around the globe; don’t miss the lovely museum store here.


pages: 972 words: 259,764

The Road Not Taken: Edward Lansdale and the American Tragedy in Vietnam by Max Boot

American ideology, anti-communist, Berlin Wall, Charles Lindbergh, colonial rule, cuban missile crisis, David Brooks, desegregation, Dissolution of the Soviet Union, drone strike, European colonialism, facts on the ground, failed state, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Golden Gate Park, jitney, land reform, Mikhail Gorbachev, Potemkin village, RAND corporation, Ronald Reagan, South China Sea, Steve Jobs, War on Poverty, white picket fence, Works Progress Administration

His worst grade was an F in Latin, demonstrating for neither the first nor the last time his inability to learn foreign languages. His greatest achievement was to complete enough extra coursework to graduate a semester early, in December 1926.6 GOING FROM an old institution of learning to a new one, Lansdale entered the University of California at Los Angeles, better known as UCLA, early in 1927—a year that would see Charles Lindbergh’s celebrated solo flight across the Atlantic and the release of the first full-length motion picture with sound. The university was but eight years old and the campus was still located, as it had been since its inception in 1919, on a 25-acre plot on the outskirts of downtown Los Angeles. It would not move to its present location in Westwood—the name bestowed by the real estate developers Harold and Edwin Janss on an empty 383-acre tract near the Pacific Ocean—until Lansdale was a junior.


George Marshall: Defender of the Republic by David L. Roll

anti-communist, British Empire, Charles Lindbergh, David Brooks, Defenestration of Prague, Donald Trump, European colonialism, fear of failure, invisible hand, MITM: man-in-the-middle, Monroe Doctrine, mutually assured destruction, one-China policy, one-state solution, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Simon Kuznets, South China Sea, Steve Jobs, trade liberalization, Works Progress Administration, yellow journalism

When it was over, Marshall would write an affectionate note to Pershing saying that his years with the great general “will always remain the unique experience of my career.”60 Throughout the summer of 1919, Marshall accompanied Pershing on trips to revisit battlefields, and to be feted at parades, dinners, dances, and gala receptions in France, Italy, and England. In Paris, Marshall was introduced to Pershing’s chief civilian aide, Dwight Morrow, a partner in J.P. Morgan & Co., the largest and most powerful commercial bank in the United States. Morrow, whose daughter Anne would marry Charles Lindbergh, reportedly offered Marshall a job at Morgan at an annual salary of $30,000 (more than $435,000 today). Marshall graciously turned him down. In London, Marshall stood with Pershing and Winston Churchill in Hyde Park, watching an American “victory” regiment march by in review.61 Churchill turned to Marshall and remarked, “What a magnificent body of men never to take a drink.”62 Churchill was, of course, referring to the fact that Prohibition in America was about to go into effect.


Presidents of War by Michael Beschloss

anti-communist, British Empire, California gold rush, Charles Lindbergh, continuation of politics by other means, cuban missile crisis, desegregation, Donald Trump, full employment, Henry Ford's grandson gave labor union leader Walter Reuther a tour of the company’s new, automated factory…, long peace, Monroe Doctrine, New Journalism, Ronald Reagan, traveling salesman, War on Poverty, Works Progress Administration

That night, in a fireside chat, Roosevelt (no doubt recalling Wilson’s demand of 1914 that Americans be “impartial in thought, as well as action”) told radio listeners, “This nation will remain a neutral nation, but I cannot ask that every American remain neutral in thought as well.” Still he soon asked the leaders of Congress to call their members back from summer recess to repeal the Neutrality Acts. Outraged by the growing possibility of American involvement in Europe, Charles Lindbergh, an American hero since making the first transatlantic solo aerial crossing, gave his first formal speech since the kidnapping and murder of his infant son in 1932. By radio, Lindbergh warned that the new conflict was “not a question of banding together to defend the white race from invasion” but “simply one of those age-old struggles within our own family of nations, a quarrel rising from the errors of the last war.”


pages: 1,104 words: 302,176

The Rise and Fall of American Growth: The U.S. Standard of Living Since the Civil War (The Princeton Economic History of the Western World) by Robert J. Gordon

"Robert Solow", 3D printing, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, airline deregulation, airport security, Apple II, barriers to entry, big-box store, blue-collar work, business cycle, Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty, Charles Lindbergh, clean water, collective bargaining, computer age, creative destruction, deindustrialization, Detroit bankruptcy, discovery of penicillin, Donner party, Downton Abbey, Edward Glaeser, en.wikipedia.org, Erik Brynjolfsson, everywhere but in the productivity statistics, feminist movement, financial innovation, full employment, George Akerlof, germ theory of disease, glass ceiling, high net worth, housing crisis, immigration reform, impulse control, income inequality, income per capita, indoor plumbing, industrial robot, inflight wifi, interchangeable parts, invention of agriculture, invention of air conditioning, invention of the sewing machine, invention of the telegraph, invention of the telephone, inventory management, James Watt: steam engine, Jeff Bezos, jitney, job automation, John Markoff, John Maynard Keynes: Economic Possibilities for our Grandchildren, labor-force participation, Loma Prieta earthquake, Louis Daguerre, Louis Pasteur, low skilled workers, manufacturing employment, Mark Zuckerberg, market fragmentation, Mason jar, mass immigration, mass incarceration, McMansion, Menlo Park, minimum wage unemployment, mortgage debt, mortgage tax deduction, new economy, Norbert Wiener, obamacare, occupational segregation, oil shale / tar sands, oil shock, payday loans, Peter Thiel, pink-collar, Productivity paradox, Ralph Nader, Ralph Waldo Emerson, refrigerator car, rent control, Robert X Cringely, Ronald Coase, school choice, Second Machine Age, secular stagnation, Skype, stem cell, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Steven Pinker, The Market for Lemons, The Rise and Fall of American Growth, Thomas Malthus, total factor productivity, transaction costs, transcontinental railway, traveling salesman, Triangle Shirtwaist Factory, undersea cable, Unsafe at Any Speed, Upton Sinclair, upwardly mobile, urban decay, urban planning, urban sprawl, washing machines reduced drudgery, Washington Consensus, Watson beat the top human players on Jeopardy!, We wanted flying cars, instead we got 140 characters, working poor, working-age population, Works Progress Administration, yellow journalism, yield management

Cuddeback became anxious as the 6:00 am departure time came and went. Finally, after 20 minutes of pulling, the engine caught and Cuddeback roared off for Elko.34 So well recorded was that day that a letter addressed to Charles J. Rose, U.S. Air Mail Field, Elko, Nevada, signed by the pilot, has pride of place today in the corporate archives of United Airlines. Now let us flash forward five years to November 19, 1931, in an event involving Charles Lindbergh just four years after his solo transatlantic flight, the first ever, had made him the most famous man in the world. Lindbergh was sitting in an airport lounge with Igor Sikorsky, a Russian immigrant best known for inventing the first viable helicopter in 1939. Together the two men began preliminary sketches on the back of a menu, as they envisaged the plane, to be called the Sikorsky S-42, that four years later would fly the first nonstop service from San Francisco to Honolulu, 2,400 miles away.35 And that same plane would continue onward to Manila in the Philippines, then an American colony.36 Through a curious victory of necessity birthing invention, aircraft designers somehow figured out how to achieve that range at a time when the newly introduced DC-3 carried only twenty-one passengers and could fly only as far as New York to Chicago.


pages: 1,073 words: 314,528

Strategy: A History by Lawrence Freedman

Albert Einstein, anti-communist, Anton Chekhov, Ayatollah Khomeini, barriers to entry, battle of ideas, Black Swan, British Empire, business process, butterfly effect, centre right, Charles Lindbergh, circulation of elites, cognitive dissonance, coherent worldview, collective bargaining, complexity theory, conceptual framework, corporate raider, correlation does not imply causation, creative destruction, cuban missile crisis, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, defense in depth, desegregation, Edward Lorenz: Chaos theory, en.wikipedia.org, endogenous growth, endowment effect, Ford paid five dollars a day, framing effect, Frederick Winslow Taylor, Gordon Gekko, greed is good, information retrieval, interchangeable parts, invisible hand, John Nash: game theory, John von Neumann, Kenneth Arrow, lateral thinking, linear programming, loose coupling, loss aversion, Mahatma Gandhi, means of production, mental accounting, Murray Gell-Mann, mutually assured destruction, Nash equilibrium, Nelson Mandela, Norbert Wiener, Norman Mailer, oil shock, Pareto efficiency, performance metric, Philip Mirowski, prisoner's dilemma, profit maximization, race to the bottom, Ralph Nader, RAND corporation, Richard Thaler, road to serfdom, Ronald Reagan, Rosa Parks, shareholder value, social intelligence, Steven Pinker, strikebreaker, The Chicago School, The Myth of the Rational Market, the scientific method, theory of mind, Thomas Davenport, Thomas Kuhn: the structure of scientific revolutions, Torches of Freedom, Toyota Production System, transaction costs, ultimatum game, unemployed young men, Upton Sinclair, urban sprawl, Vilfredo Pareto, War on Poverty, women in the workforce, Yogi Berra, zero-sum game

Laton McCartney, The Teapot Dome Scandal: How Big Oil Bought the Harding White House and Tried to Steal the Country (New York: Random House, 2008). 29. Although the first senator to come out for Roosevelt and the New Deal, by 1939 he was known as a vigorous isolationist and for accusations that Jews in Hollywood were using the influence of the movies to stir up prowar fervor. He denied Japan’s hostile intent in the weeks before Pearl Harbor. This background led him to have a later literary incarnation, as Charles Lindbergh’s vice president in Philip Roth’s The Plot Against America (New York: Random House, 2004). 30. Michael Kazin, American Dreamers (see chap. 25, n. 51), 187; Charles Lindblom and John A. Hall, “Frank Capra Meets John Doe: Anti-politics in American National Identity,” in Mette Hjort and Scott Mackenzie, eds., Cinema and Nation (New York: Routledge, 2000). See also Joseph McBride, Frank Capra (Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 2011). 31.


pages: 1,169 words: 342,959

New York by Edward Rutherfurd

Bonfire of the Vanities, British Empire, Charles Lindbergh, illegal immigration, margin call, millennium bug, out of africa, place-making, plutocrats, Plutocrats, rent control, short selling, Silicon Valley, South Sea Bubble, the market place, urban renewal, white picket fence, Y2K, young professional

On May 20, however, a young American that few people had ever heard of managed to take off from Roosevelt Field, Long Island, in a single-seater, single-engine monoplane that he called the Spirit of St. Louis. By the night of the next day, after flying through rain, wind and fog, sometimes above the clouds and sometimes only feet above the Atlantic waves, the young fellow arrived at Paris’s Le Bourget airport, where a night-time crowd of 150,000 had gathered to meet him. From that moment young Charles Lindbergh became an international sensation. Despite losing two of their own national heroes that month, the French took the young American to their hearts. Breaking all protocol, the Foreign Ministry at the Quai d’Orsay flew the Stars and Stripes from its flagpole. The President of France gave Lindbergh the Légion d’honneur. Now Lindbergh was back in America, and it was not an opportunity that sporting Mayor Walker of New York was going to miss.


pages: 675 words: 344,555

Frommer's Hawaii 2009 by Jeanette Foster

airport security, California gold rush, Charles Lindbergh, glass ceiling, gravity well, haute couture, haute cuisine, indoor plumbing, Maui Hawaii, place-making, polynesian navigation, South China Sea, sustainable-tourism, urban renewal, urban sprawl, white picket fence, Yogi Berra

Joseph’s Church with such a bold ray of light that it looks as if God is about to perform a miracle. This little 1876 wood-frame church is one of four Father Damien built “topside” on Molokai. Restored in 1971, the church stands beside a seaside cemetery, where feral cats play under the gaze of a Damien statue amid gravestones decorated with flower leis. King Kamehameha V Hwy. (Hwy. 450), just after mile marker 10. In 1927, Charles Lindbergh soloed across the Atlantic Ocean in a plane called The Spirit of St. Louis and became an American hero. That same year, Ernie Smith and Emory B. Bronte took off from Oakland, California, on July 14, in a single-engine Travelair aircraft named The City of Oakland, headed across the Pacific Ocean for Honolulu, 2,397 miles away. The next day, after running out of fuel, they crash-landed upside-down in a kiawe thicket on Molokai, but emerged unhurt to become the first civilians to fly to Hawaii from the U.S. mainland.


Eastern USA by Lonely Planet

1960s counterculture, active transport: walking or cycling, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Albert Einstein, Berlin Wall, bike sharing scheme, Bretton Woods, British Empire, car-free, carbon footprint, centre right, Charles Lindbergh, collective bargaining, cuban missile crisis, desegregation, Donald Trump, East Village, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Frank Gehry, glass ceiling, Guggenheim Bilbao, haute cuisine, Hernando de Soto, illegal immigration, immigration reform, information trail, interchangeable parts, jitney, Kickstarter, license plate recognition, Mason jar, mass immigration, McMansion, megacity, Menlo Park, new economy, New Urbanism, obamacare, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Ronald Reagan, Rosa Parks, Saturday Night Live, Silicon Valley, Skype, the built environment, the High Line, the payments system, transcontinental railway, union organizing, Upton Sinclair, upwardly mobile, urban decay, urban planning, urban renewal, urban sprawl, walkable city, white flight, Works Progress Administration, young professional

Until then, you can peruse its temporary galleries on the 2nd floor of the National Museum of American History. All museums are open daily (except Christmas Day) 10am to 5:30pm unless noted. Some have extended hours in summer. Be prepared for lines and bag checks. National Air & Space Museum MUSEUM (cnr 6th St & Independence Ave SW) The Air & Space Museum is the most popular Smithsonian museum; everyone flocks to see the Wright brothers’ flyer, Chuck Yeager’s Bell X-1, Charles Lindbergh’s Spirit of St Louis and the Apollo 11 command module. An IMAX theater, planetarium and ride simulator are all here (adult/child $9/7.50 each). More avionic pieces reside in Virginia at the Steven F Udvar-Hazy Center (Click here), an annex to hold this museum’s leftovers. National Museum of Natural History MUSEUM (cnr 10th St & Constitution Ave SW) A favorite of the kids, the Museum of Natural History showcases dinosaur skeletons, an archae- ology/anthropology collection, wonders from the ocean, and unusual gems and minerals, including the 45-carat Hope Diamond.


France (Lonely Planet, 8th Edition) by Nicola Williams

active transport: walking or cycling, back-to-the-land, bike sharing scheme, British Empire, car-free, carbon footprint, centre right, Charles Lindbergh, Columbine, double helix, Guggenheim Bilbao, haute couture, haute cuisine, Henri Poincaré, Honoré de Balzac, illegal immigration, industrial robot, information trail, Jacquard loom, Joseph-Marie Jacquard, Kickstarter, Louis Blériot, Louis Pasteur, low cost airline, low cost carrier, Mahatma Gandhi, means of production, Murano, Venice glass, pension reform, post-work, QWERTY keyboard, ride hailing / ride sharing, Saturday Night Live, Silicon Valley, Skype, Sloane Ranger, supervolcano, trade route, urban renewal, urban sprawl, V2 rocket

Mayet Hôtel (Map; 01 47 83 21 35; www.mayet.com; 3 rue Mayet, 6e; Duroc; s incl breakfast €95-120, d €120-140, tr €160; ) Light-hearted and loads of fun, this 23-room boutique hotel with drippy murals and a penchant for oversize clocks and primary colours, has good-sized rooms and bathrooms, most with tubs. It offers excellent value and complimentary breakfast too. Hôtel Lindbergh (Map; 01 45 48 35 53; www.paris-hotel-lindbergh.com; 5 rue Chomel, 7e; Sèvres Babylone; d €98-160, tr €156-180, q €166-190; ) We still haven’t figured out why this 26-room hôtel de charme (charming hotel) is totally kitted out in Charles Lindbergh photos and memorabilia, but it works. We also like the room number plates on the doors with little Paris landmarks, the ample-sized bathrooms and the friendly staff. Hôtel Muguet (Map; 01 47 05 05 93; www.hotelmuguet.com; 11 rue Chevert, 7e; La Tour Maubourg; s/d/tr €103/135/180; ) This hotel strategically placed between Invalides and the Eiffel Tower has 48 generously sized rooms that have been recently renovated.


Lonely Planet France by Lonely Planet Publications

banking crisis, bike sharing scheme, British Empire, car-free, carbon footprint, centre right, Charles Lindbergh, Columbine, double helix, Frank Gehry, G4S, glass ceiling, haute couture, haute cuisine, Henri Poincaré, Honoré de Balzac, illegal immigration, Jacquard loom, Joseph-Marie Jacquard, Kickstarter, Louis Blériot, Louis Pasteur, low cost airline, low cost carrier, Mahatma Gandhi, mass immigration, Murano, Venice glass, ride hailing / ride sharing, sensible shoes, Silicon Valley, supervolcano, trade route, urban renewal, urban sprawl, V2 rocket

Hôtel d’Angleterre HISTORIC HOTEL €€€ Offline map Google map ( 01 42 60 34 72; www.hotel-dangleterre.com; 44 rue Jacob, 6e; s €160, d €220-260; ; St-Germain des Prés) If the walls could talk... The garden of the beautiful 27-room ‘England Hotel’ – a former British Embassy – is where the Treaty of Paris ending the American Revolution was prepared in 1783. Hemingway lodged here in 1921, as did Charles Lindbergh in 1927 after completing the world’s first solo nonstop flight from New York to Paris. Rooms are individually – and exquisitely – decorated; rates include breakfast. Hôtel St-André des Arts HOTEL € Offline map Google map ( 01 43 26 96 16; 66 rue St-André des Arts, 6e; s/d/tr/q incl breakfast €75/95/119/132; ; Odéon) Located on a lively, restaurant-lined thoroughfare, this 31-room hotel is a veritable bargain in the centre of the action.