Steve Bannon

86 results back to index


pages: 307 words: 88,745

War for Eternity: Inside Bannon's Far-Right Circle of Global Power Brokers by Benjamin R. Teitelbaum

Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, bitcoin, Boris Johnson, creative destruction, crony capitalism, cryptocurrency, Donald Trump, Etonian, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, illegal immigration, Joseph Schumpeter, liberal capitalism, liberal world order, mass immigration, mutually assured destruction, Network effects, Saturday Night Live, school choice, side project, Skype, South China Sea, Steve Bannon, Westphalian system, WikiLeaks

were a problem for leftists: See Richard Hughes Seager, Buddhism in America (New York: Columbia University Press, 1999). Chapter 3: The Jedi Master a sign of phoniness: David Von Drehle, “Steve Bannon Is a Swiss-Cheese Philosopher,” Washington Post, September 12, 2017, https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/steve-bannon-is-a-swiss-cheese-philosopher/2017/09/12/3a45f43c-97e7-11e7-82e4-f1076f6d6152_story.html. “an adviser who hearkens back to Julius Evola”: “Steve Bannon at DHI,” Soundcloud (BuzzFeed News), 2014. https://soundcloud.com/buzzfeednews/steve-bannon-at-dhi. Chapter 4: Killing Time the hidden world of their own psyches: See Natalya Tamruchi, “Bezumie kak oblast svobody,” NLO 100 (2009), http://magazines.russ.ru/nlo/2009/100/ta33-pr.html.

v=blYxwdG8dBo. I have edited this translation of the speech. He had met with Eduardo Bolsonaro: “Steve Bannon Endorses Far-Right Brazilian Presidential Candidate,” Reuters, October 26, 2018, https://www.reuters.com/article/us-brazil-election-bannon/steve-bannon-endorses-far-right-brazilian-presidential-candidate-idUSKCN1N01S1. advising the Bolsonaro election campaign: “Brazil: Steve Bannon to Advise Bolsonaro Presidential Campaign,” Telesur, August 15, 2018, https://www.telesurenglish.net/news/Brazil-Steve-Bannon-to-Advise-Bolsonaro-Presidential-Campaign-20180815-0003.html. occultist magazine Planète: This magazine was founded by Louis Pauwels, who later collaborated with Alain de Benoist of the French New Right.

“not to criticize far-right activists”: Maggie Haberman and Glenn Thrush, “Bannon in Limbo as Trump Faces Growing Calls for the Strategist’s Ouster,” New York Times, August 14, 2017, https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/14/us/politics/steve-bannon-trump-white-house.html. courageous refusal to bow to media: Jonathan Swan, “What Steve Bannon Thinks About Charlottesville,” Axios, August 16, 2017, https://www.axios.com/what-steve-bannon-thinks-about-charlottesville-1513304895-7ee2c933-e6d5-4692-bc20-c1db88afe970.html. critics blamed the incident on Bannon’s influence: Michael D. Shear and Maggie Haberman, “Trump Defends Initial Remarks on Charlottesville; Again Blames ‘Both Sides,’” New York Times, August 15, 2017, https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/15/us/politics/trump-press-conference-charlottesville.html.


pages: 296 words: 78,112

Devil's Bargain: Steve Bannon, Donald Trump, and the Storming of the Presidency by Joshua Green

4chan, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Ayatollah Khomeini, Bernie Sanders, Biosphere 2, business climate, centre right, Charles Lindbergh, coherent worldview, collateralized debt obligation, conceptual framework, corporate raider, crony capitalism, currency manipulation / currency intervention, Donald Trump, Fractional reserve banking, Goldman Sachs: Vampire Squid, Gordon Gekko, guest worker program, illegal immigration, immigration reform, liberation theology, low skilled workers, Nate Silver, Nelson Mandela, nuclear winter, obamacare, Peace of Westphalia, Peter Thiel, quantitative hedge fund, Renaissance Technologies, Robert Mercer, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, social intelligence, speech recognition, Steve Bannon, urban planning

“He was not a rebel”: Matt Viser, “Harvard Classmates Barely Recognize Bannon of Today, Boston Globe, November 26, 2016, https://www.bostonglobe.com/news/politics/2016/11/26/look-steven-bannon-and-his-years-harvard-business-school/B2m0j85jh5jRKzKbMastzK/story.html. Chapter Four: “A Dangerous Way to Look at the World” Bannon started a production company: Daniel Miller, “Inside the Hollywood Past of Stephen K. Bannon, Donald Trump’s Campaign Chief,” Los Angeles Times, August 20, 2016, www.latimes.com/entertainment/envelope/cotown/la-et-ct-stephen-bannon-donald-trump-hollywood-20160830-snap-story.html. a shady, little-known Italian: David McClintick and Anne Faircloth, “The Predator: How an Italian Thug Looted MGM, Brought Crédit Lyonnais to Its Knees, and Made the Pope Cry, Fortune, July 8, 1996, archive.fortune.com/magazines/fortune/fortune_archive/1996/07/08/214344/index.htm.

,’” Breitbart.com, August 9, 2015, www.breitbart.com/video/2015/08/09/megyn-kelly-if-you-cant-get-past-me-how-are-you-gonna-handle-vladimir-putin/. “Mr. Trump is an interesting man”: Megyn Kelly, “Megyn Kelly Addresses Donald Trump’s Remarks,” The Kelly File, August 10, 2015, video.foxnews.com/v/4412819805001/?#sp=show-clips. “The Arrogance of Power”: Stephen K. Bannon and Alexander Marlow, “The Arrogance of Power: Megyn Kelly’s ‘Good Journalism,’” Breitbart.com, August 11, 2015, www.breitbart.com/big-journalism/2015/08/11/the-arrogance-of-power-megyn-kellys-good-journalism/. “Roger Ailes just called”: Donald J. Trump, Twitter post, August 10, 2015, 8:35 A.M., twitter.com/realdonaldtrump/status/630764447716540417.

He’s like an organism that could have grown and blossomed only under a precise and exacting set of conditions—a black orchid. This book is the backstory of how those conditions came to be—it’s the part of the movie you haven’t seen. To understand Trump’s extraordinary rise, you have to go all the way back and begin with Steve Bannon, or else it doesn’t make sense. TWO “WHERE’S MY STEVE?” The Trump-Bannon partnership, like so much else in Trump’s life, has a bizarre and winding lineage that traces back to a lawsuit. In the mid-1990s, Steve Wynn, the Las Vegas casino mogul, was looking to move in on Atlantic City, New Jersey, a possibility that threatened the livelihoods of the Trump Plaza Hotel and Casino, the Trump Taj Mahal, and other gambling establishments along Atlantic City’s Boardwalk.


pages: 359 words: 113,847

Siege: Trump Under Fire by Michael Wolff

Bernie Madoff, Boris Johnson, conceptual framework, cuban missile crisis, currency manipulation / currency intervention, Deng Xiaoping, disinformation, Donald Trump, forensic accounting, gig economy, high net worth, hiring and firing, illegal immigration, immigration reform, impulse control, Jeffrey Epstein, Julian Assange, oil shale / tar sands, Potemkin village, Saturday Night Live, sovereign wealth fund, Steve Bannon, Steve Jobs, WikiLeaks

If you believe the copy of this e-book you are reading infringes on the author’s copyright, please notify the publisher at: us.macmillanusa.com/piracy. To the Memory of My Father Lewis A. Wolff Acknowledgments * * * Immediately after Fire and Fury was published, the president publicly and furiously broke with Stephen K. Bannon, the man arguably most responsible for making him president, over remarks he had made in the book. Donald Trump’s wrath helped cost Bannon the backing of his patrons, billionaire Bob Mercer and his daughter Rebekah, and forced his departure from Breitbart News, the news site that Bannon led and the Mercers controlled.

My book Fire and Fury was the resulting account of the organizational chaos and constant drama—more psychodrama than political drama—of Trump’s first seven months in office. Here was a volatile and uncertain president, releasing, almost on a daily basis, his strange furies on the world, and, at the same time, on his own staff. This first phase of the most abnormal White House in American history ended in August 2017, with the departure of chief strategist Stephen K. Bannon and the appointment of retired general John Kelly as chief of staff. This new account begins in February 2018 at the outset of Trump’s second year in office, with the situation now profoundly altered. The president’s capricious furies have been met by an increasingly organized and methodical institutional response.

Donald Trump’s wrath helped cost Bannon the backing of his patrons, billionaire Bob Mercer and his daughter Rebekah, and forced his departure from Breitbart News, the news site that Bannon led and the Mercers controlled. It is a measure of Bannon’s character that he stood by his remarks in Fire and Fury without complaint, quibbles, or hurt feelings. In all my years in this business, I have encountered few sources who, after revealing themselves, didn’t blame the person who exposed them. Steve Bannon, as the most clear-eyed interpreter of the Trump phenomenon I know, as the Virgil anyone might be lucky to have as a guide for a descent into Trumpworld—and as Dr. Frankenstein with his own deep ambivalence about the monster he created—is, in this volume, back again, and on the record, with my thanks for his trust and cooperation


pages: 394 words: 112,770

Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House by Michael Wolff

Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, barriers to entry, Bernie Sanders, Biosphere 2, centre right, disinformation, disintermediation, Donald Trump, drone strike, Edward Snowden, Elon Musk, forensic accounting, illegal immigration, impulse control, Jeff Bezos, Jeffrey Epstein, obamacare, Peter Thiel, Renaissance Technologies, ride hailing / ride sharing, Robert Mercer, Ronald Reagan, Saturday Night Live, self-driving car, Silicon Valley, single-payer health, Steve Bannon, Travis Kalanick, WikiLeaks, zero-sum game

This was originally conceived as an account of the Trump administration’s first hundred days, that most traditional marker of a presidency. But events barreled on without natural pause for more than two hundred days, the curtain coming down on the first act of Trump’s presidency only with the appointment of retired general John Kelly as the chief of staff in late July and the exit of chief strategist Stephen K. Bannon three weeks later. The events I’ve described in these pages are based on conversations that took place over a period of eighteen months with the president, with most members of his senior staff—some of whom talked to me dozens of times—and with many people who they in turn spoke to. The first interview occurred well before I could have imagined a Trump White House, much less a book about it, in late May 2016 at Trump’s home in Beverly Hills—the then candidate polishing off a pint of Häagen-Dazs vanilla as he happily and idly opined about a range of topics while his aides, Hope Hicks, Corey Lewandowski, and Jared Kushner, went in and out of the room.

He’d had only a few conversations with Bob Mercer, who mostly talked in monosyllables; Rebekah Mercer’s entire history with Trump consisted of a selfie taken with him at Trump Tower. But when the Mercers presented their plan to take over the campaign and install their lieutenants, Steve Bannon and Kellyanne Conway, Trump didn’t resist. He only expressed vast incomprehension about why anyone would want to do that. “This thing,” he told the Mercers, “is so fucked up.” By every meaningful indicator, something greater than even a sense of doom shadowed what Steve Bannon called “the broke-dick campaign”—a sense of structural impossibility. The candidate who billed himself as a billionaire—ten times over—refused even to invest his own money in it.

Bob Woodward, who helped bring Nixon down—and who himself became a figure of unchallengeable presidential mythmaking—wrote a long shelf of books in which even the most misguided presidential actions seemed part of an epochal march of ultimate responsibility and life-and-death decision making. Only the most hardhearted reader would not entertain a daydream in which he or she was not part of this awesome pageant. Steve Bannon was such a daydreamer. * * * But if Halberstam defined the presidential mien, Trump defied it—and defiled it. Not a single attribute would place him credibly in the revered circle of American presidential character and power. Which was, in a curious reversal of the book’s premise, just what created Steve Bannon’s opportunity. The less likely a presidential candidate is, the more unlikely, and, often, inexperienced, his aides are—that is, an unlikely candidate can attract only unlikely aides, as the likely ones go to the more likely candidates.


pages: 788 words: 223,004

Merchants of Truth: The Business of News and the Fight for Facts by Jill Abramson

23andMe, 4chan, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Alexander Shulgin, Apple's 1984 Super Bowl advert, barriers to entry, Bernie Madoff, Bernie Sanders, Charles Lindbergh, Chelsea Manning, citizen journalism, cloud computing, commoditize, corporate governance, creative destruction, crowdsourcing, death of newspapers, digital twin, diversified portfolio, Donald Trump, East Village, Edward Snowden, Ferguson, Missouri, Filter Bubble, future of journalism, glass ceiling, Google Glasses, haute couture, hive mind, income inequality, information asymmetry, invisible hand, Jeff Bezos, Joseph Schumpeter, Khyber Pass, late capitalism, Marc Andreessen, Mark Zuckerberg, move fast and break things, move fast and break things, Nate Silver, new economy, obamacare, Occupy movement, performance metric, Peter Thiel, phenotype, pre–internet, race to the bottom, recommendation engine, Robert Mercer, Ronald Reagan, Saturday Night Live, self-driving car, sentiment analysis, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley ideology, Silicon Valley startup, skunkworks, Snapchat, social intelligence, social web, Steve Bannon, Steve Jobs, Steven Levy, technoutopianism, telemarketer, the scientific method, The Wisdom of Crowds, Tim Cook: Apple, too big to fail, WeWork, WikiLeaks, Yochai Benkler, you are the product

“The idea,” he told Wired: Noah Shachtman, “How Andrew Breitbart Hacked the Media,” Wired, March 11, 2010, https://www.wired.com/2010/03/ff-andrew-brietbart/. That December Breitbart attended: Joshua Green, Devil’s Bargain: Steve Bannon, Donald Trump, and the Storming of the Presidency (New York: Penguin, 2017), 85–87. See also Joshua Green interview with Matthew Boyle, “Exclusive—A Devil’s Bargain: How Steve Bannon Met Andrew Breitbart, Then Put Conservatives on Path to Destroy Hillary Clinton Once and For All,” Breitbart, July 19, 2017, https://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2017/07/19/exclusive-a-devils-bargain-how-steve-bannon-met-andrew-breitbart-put-conservatives-path-destroy-hillary-clinton-once-for-all/. From its very origin: “#WAR—Breitbart 1st Installment,” YouTube (video), 1:41, August 6, 2012, https://www.youtube.com/watch?

He quietly created Breitbart.com in the likeness of the Drudge Report in late 2005, just half a year after HuffPo’s launch, when BuzzFeed was still just a twinkle in Peretti’s eye. But Breitbart still wasn’t sure what he wanted to do with it. That December Breitbart attended the Liberty Film Festival, where a film called Reagan’s War was set to debut. The young blogger was casting about for like-minded culture warriors. He saw in the film’s director, Stephen K. Bannon, a kindred spirit. As the audience filed out after the Q&A, he approached Bannon. “Brother, we’ve got to change the culture,” he said. “You’re one of us.” Breitbart liked to say that politics was downstream from culture, and as Joshua Green recounts in Devil’s Bargain, he and Bannon were in an upstream position at the moment, equipped to assert themselves at the center of a new right-wing media wave.

“I think Donald Trump”: Joy Behar Show, CNN (transcript), April 19, 2011, http://www.cnn.com/TRANSCRIPTS/1104/19/joy.01.html. Using a tool called Prism: Adrian Chen, “The Agency,” New York Times Magazine, June 2, 2015, https://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/07/magazine/the-agency.html. Long before he would take: Scott Shane, “Combative, Populist Steve Bannon Found His Man in Donald Trump,” New York Times, November 27, 2016, https://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/27/us/politics/steve-bannon-white-house.html. A Columbia Journalism Review study: Yochai Benkler, Robert Faris, Hal Roberts, and Ethan Zuckerman, “Study: Breitbart-Led Right-Wing Media Ecosystem Altered Broader Media Agenda,” Columbia Journalism Review, March 3, 2017, https://www.cjr.org/analysis/breitbart-media-trump-harvard-study.php.


pages: 372 words: 100,947

An Ugly Truth: Inside Facebook's Battle for Domination by Sheera Frenkel, Cecilia Kang

affirmative action, augmented reality, autonomous vehicles, Ben Horowitz, Bernie Sanders, blockchain, clean water, coronavirus, Covid-19, COVID-19, disinformation, don't be evil, Donald Trump, Edward Snowden, global pandemic, hockey-stick growth, Ian Bogost, illegal immigration, immigration reform, independent contractor, Jeff Bezos, Marc Andreessen, Mark Zuckerberg, Menlo Park, natural language processing, offshore financial centre, Peter Thiel, QAnon, RAND corporation, ride hailing / ride sharing, Robert Mercer, Sam Altman, Saturday Night Live, Shoshana Zuboff, Silicon Valley, Snapchat, social web, Steve Bannon, Steve Jobs, Steven Levy, subscription business, surveillance capitalism, Travis Kalanick, WikiLeaks

Chapter 8 Delete Facebook On March 17, 2018, the New York Times and the Observer of London broke front-page stories about a company called Cambridge Analytica that had obtained profile information, records of likes and shares, photo and location tags, and the lists of friends of tens of millions of Facebook users. A whistleblower within the UK-based political consulting firm had brought the story to the news organizations with a stunning claim that the firm, funded by Trump supporter Robert Mercer and led by Trump’s senior adviser, Stephen K. Bannon, had created a new level of political ad targeting using Facebook data on personality traits and political values. But the jaw-dropping detail was that Cambridge Analytica had harvested the Facebook data without users’ permission. “The breach allowed the company to exploit the private social media activity of a huge swath of the American electorate, developing techniques that underpinned its work on President Trump’s campaign in 2016,” the New York Times reported.1 The Observer wrote that the “unprecedented data harvesting, and the use to which it was put, raises urgent new questions about Facebook’s role in targeting voters in the US presidential election.”2 It was the latest breach of trust in Facebook’s repeated pattern of data privacy abuses.

And the article published as a result of those conversations, on the morning of Monday, May 9, 2016, delivered. Titled “Former Facebook Workers: We Routinely Suppressed Conservative News,”4 the bombshell story appeared to confirm suspicions long held by conservatives and long voiced by far-right political pundits like Glenn Beck and Trump campaign leader Steve Bannon. It claimed that Facebook and other gatekeepers of information on the internet were putting their thumbs on the scale. The piece had a controversial reception, with some questioning its agenda. And within Facebook, members of the Trending Topics team were furious at how the article portrayed their work.

They created numerous iterations of a single ad, changing colors and tweaking a word here and there to appeal to specific demographics and voters in microtargeted geographies. The Facebook ads were often responses to negative narratives about Trump in the mainstream media. His actual political rival was less important, Trump’s former senior adviser Steve Bannon had explained in a Bloomberg interview in February 2018. “The Democrats don’t matter. The real opposition is the media,” he said. “And the way to deal with them is to flood the zone with shit.” Sandberg wasn’t taking part in Kaplan’s dinners. Her focus was on improving relations with other critics.


pages: 357 words: 99,456

Hate Inc.: Why Today’s Media Makes Us Despise One Another by Matt Taibbi

4chan, affirmative action, anti-communist, Berlin Wall, Bernie Sanders, Chelsea Manning, commoditize, crack epidemic, David Brooks, disinformation, Donald Trump, drone strike, failed state, Fall of the Berlin Wall, financial deregulation, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, Gordon Gekko, greed is good, Howard Zinn, illegal immigration, immigration reform, interest rate swap, Julian Assange, Kickstarter, Marshall McLuhan, moral panic, Nate Silver, Peter Thiel, pink-collar, Ponzi scheme, pre–internet, profit motive, quantitative easing, Ralph Nader, rent-seeking, rolodex, Ronald Reagan, Rubik’s Cube, Saturday Night Live, Seymour Hersh, Silicon Valley, Stephen Hawking, Steve Bannon, Steven Pinker, traveling salesman, unpaid internship, WikiLeaks, working poor, Y2K

Michael Shearer of the Post argued something similar: Like several other Senate candidates eyeing 2020, Warren has endorsed a suite of expensive policy proposals that have made some in the party nervous… For this reason, some Republicans have signaled that they would welcome a Warren run in 2020. Stephen K. Bannon, a former aide to Trump, dismisses Warren as “the weakest candidate the Democrats could put up.” The easiest way to predict what kinds of “electability” stories you’ll see in an election season is to look at the field of candidates and see which ones have a lot of lobbying and ad money behind them.

Shouldn’t we want the best qualified people to run government just as we want the best qualified to fly airplanes, perform surgery, design buildings, etc? Trump politically was and is a million miles from the ideals of the original Populists. However, in 2016, he constantly invited ridicule from smarty-pants national media figures of the Boot type, knowing it could only burnish his “populist” credentials. That August, with Steve Bannon as his campaign manager, Trump added a twist, selling himself to audiences as a savior of African Americans. “I thought about Abraham Lincoln, Abraham Lincoln is a pretty good Republican,” Trump cracked that day in Iowa. “It brings me to a subject that is important and personal for me. Nothing means more to me than making our party the home of the African-American vote…” Snickers shot through the press section.


pages: 391 words: 123,597

Targeted: The Cambridge Analytica Whistleblower's Inside Story of How Big Data, Trump, and Facebook Broke Democracy and How It Can Happen Again by Brittany Kaiser

Albert Einstein, Amazon Mechanical Turk, Asian financial crisis, Bernie Sanders, bitcoin, blockchain, Boris Johnson, Burning Man, call centre, centre right, Chelsea Manning, clean water, cognitive dissonance, crony capitalism, disinformation, Dominic Cummings, Donald Trump, Edward Snowden, Etonian, haute couture, illegal immigration, Julian Assange, Mark Zuckerberg, Menlo Park, Nelson Mandela, off grid, open borders, Renaissance Technologies, Robert Mercer, rolodex, sentiment analysis, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, Skype, Snapchat, statistical model, Steve Bannon, the High Line, the scientific method, WeWork, WikiLeaks, you are the product, young professional

At that time, a poll had shown that about seven in ten voters nationwide, including 52 percent of all voters said they would definitely not vote for him.15 I was fairly certain that he was a threat to neither CA’s other clients nor me. He would never win. Alexander agreed. That’s why we were in DC on June 16. We had come to see Steve Bannon, who, Alexander said, could help us get to Trump, a useful cash cow for commercial purposes, and an experiment for politics. The only thing I knew about Steve Bannon when I met him was that he was the guy who had founded CA with Alexander and the Mercers, and that he was “big” in media and film production. Alexander always spoke about “Steve” with such reverence: He was a power broker, the go-between for CA and Mercer money, the person who made campaigns happen.

Alexander had set up a meeting with Corey Lewandowski in June 2015, before the fateful day Trump descended that escalator in Trump Tower to announce his presidential bid. The two had been introduced by Steve Bannon, and the parties involved had known long before that some kind of campaign was coming. Regardless of whether Donald planned to run for president or build a bigger commercial empire, we followed the lead with steadfast efforts to get in there somehow. Over three months since June, we had gone back and forth with Corey, without confirming a meeting. But now Donald himself was asking aloud on Steve Bannon’s phone for us to come to Trump Tower and help him out. How could Corey say no to the boss? Corey Lewandowski could meet us at Trump Tower early the next morning, Trump told us.

What was the difference between the SCL Group and Cambridge Analytica? Did they share information and resources? Why was a controversial American figure like Steve Bannon on the company’s board? Alexander took each question and fumbled it. The company wasn’t fear-based. It presented the clients it represented in the best light possible. It didn’t single out voters; it was selective to whom it sent messaging, in order not to be wasteful. It had an in-house legal team that was thorough in making certain the company observed laws in other countries. Steve Bannon had advised the company on how to work in America. Alexander then likened the circumstances with Leave.EU as a series of dates that hadn’t resulted in a “value proposition” leading to a marriage.


Mindf*ck: Cambridge Analytica and the Plot to Break America by Christopher Wylie

4chan, affirmative action, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, availability heuristic, Berlin Wall, Bernie Sanders, big-box store, Boris Johnson, British Empire, call centre, Chelsea Manning, chief data officer, cognitive bias, cognitive dissonance, colonial rule, computer vision, conceptual framework, cryptocurrency, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, desegregation, disinformation, Dominic Cummings, Donald Trump, Downton Abbey, Edward Snowden, Elon Musk, Etonian, first-past-the-post, Google Earth, housing crisis, income inequality, indoor plumbing, information asymmetry, Internet of things, Julian Assange, Lyft, Marc Andreessen, Mark Zuckerberg, Menlo Park, move fast and break things, move fast and break things, Network effects, new economy, obamacare, Peter Thiel, Potemkin village, recommendation engine, Renaissance Technologies, Robert Mercer, Ronald Reagan, Rosa Parks, Sand Hill Road, Scientific racism, Shoshana Zuboff, side project, Silicon Valley, Skype, Steve Bannon, surveillance capitalism, uber lyft, unpaid internship, Valery Gerasimov, web application, WikiLeaks, zero-sum game

In examining all the complex relationships between all of these people and entities—Vote Leave, AIQ, Cambridge Analytica, Steve Bannon, the Mercers, Russia, and the Trump campaign—Cadwalladr saw that I was right in the middle of all of them. Seeming to pop up everywhere, I looked like the Zelig of 2016 to her. At first, I didn’t want to talk to Cadwalladr. I had no interest in being at the center of some massive Guardian exposé. I was exhausted, I had been burned over and over, and I wished that I could just put the Cambridge Analytica ordeal in the past. On top of that, Cambridge Analytica was no longer just a company. My old boss Steve Bannon was now sitting in the White House and on the National Security Council of the most powerful nation on earth.

As the former director of research, I’ve brought with me evidence of how Facebook’s data was weaponized by the firm, and how the systems they built left millions of Americans vulnerable to the propaganda operations of hostile foreign states. Schiff leads the questioning. A former federal prosecutor, he is sharp and precise with his lines of inquiry, and he wastes no time getting to the heart of the matter. Did you work with Steve Bannon? Yes. Did Cambridge Analytica have any contacts with potential Russian agents? Yes. Do you believe that this data was used to sway the American electorate to elect the president of the United States? Yes. An hour goes by, then two, then three. I chose to come here of my own accord and to answer these questions about how a liberal, gay twenty-four-year-old Canadian found himself part of a British military contractor developing psychological warfare tools for the American alt-right.

But with the advent of the Internet, it became possible to create commodities out of our lives—our behavior, our attention, our identity. People were processed into data. We would serve as the raw material of this new data-industrial complex. One of the first people to spot the political potential of this new reality was Steve Bannon, the relatively unknown editor of right-wing website Breitbart News, which was founded to reframe American culture according to the nationalist vision of Andrew Breitbart. Bannon saw his mission as nothing short of cultural warfare, but when I first encountered him, Bannon knew that something was missing, that he didn’t have the right weapons.


pages: 407 words: 104,622

The Man Who Solved the Market: How Jim Simons Launched the Quant Revolution by Gregory Zuckerman

affirmative action, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Albert Einstein, Andrew Wiles, automated trading system, backtesting, Bayesian statistics, Bear Stearns, beat the dealer, Benoit Mandelbrot, Berlin Wall, Bernie Madoff, blockchain, Brownian motion, butter production in bangladesh, buy and hold, buy low sell high, Claude Shannon: information theory, computer age, computerized trading, Credit Default Swap, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, diversified portfolio, Donald Trump, Edward Thorp, Elon Musk, Emanuel Derman, endowment effect, Flash crash, George Gilder, Gordon Gekko, illegal immigration, index card, index fund, Isaac Newton, John Meriwether, John Nash: game theory, John von Neumann, Loma Prieta earthquake, Long Term Capital Management, loss aversion, Louis Bachelier, mandelbrot fractal, margin call, Mark Zuckerberg, Monty Hall problem, More Guns, Less Crime, Myron Scholes, Naomi Klein, natural language processing, obamacare, p-value, pattern recognition, Peter Thiel, Ponzi scheme, prediction markets, quantitative hedge fund, quantitative trading / quantitative finance, random walk, Renaissance Technologies, Richard Thaler, Robert Mercer, Ronald Reagan, self-driving car, Sharpe ratio, Silicon Valley, sovereign wealth fund, speech recognition, statistical arbitrage, statistical model, Steve Bannon, Steve Jobs, stochastic process, the scientific method, Thomas Bayes, transaction costs, Turing machine

Carole Cadwalladr, “Revealed: How US Billionaire Helped to Back Brexit,” Guardian, February 25, 2017, https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2017/feb/26/us-billionaire-mercer-helped-back-brexit. 15. Jane Mayer, “New Evidence Emerges of Steve Bannon and Cambridge Analytica’s Role in Brexit,” New Yorker, November 17, 2018, https://www.newyorker.com/news/news-desk/new-evidence-emerges-of-steve-bannon-and-cambridge-analyticas-role-in-brexit. 16. Nigel Farage, “Farage: ‘Brexit Could Not Have Happened without Breitbart,’” interview by Alex Marlow, Turning Point USA Student Action Summit, December 20, 2018, https://www.youtube.com/watch?

Grateful acknowledgment is made for permission to reprint the following photographs: 1: Courtesy of Lee Neuwirth © Lee Neuwirth 2: Courtesy of Seth Rumshinsky 3: Photo by Rick Mott, taken at the NJ Open Go Tournament, provided with permission, courtesy of Stefi Baum 4, 5: Courtesy of Brian Keating 6: Courtesy of David Eisenbud 7: Courtesy of Wall Street Journal and Jenny Strasburg 8: Patrick McMullan/Getty Images ISBN 9780735217980 (hardcover) ISBN 9780735217997 (ebook) ISBN 9780593086315 (international edition) Jacket design: Karl Spurzem Jacket image: (equations) Virtualphoto / Getty Images Version_1 CONTENTS Also by Gregory Zuckerman Title Page Copyright Dedication Cast of Characters A Timeline of Key Events Introduction Prologue PART ONE Money Isn’t Everything Chapter One Chapter Two Chapter Three Chapter Four Chapter Five Chapter Six Chapter Seven Chapter Eight Chapter Nine Chapter Ten Chapter Eleven PART TWO Money Changes Everything Chapter Twelve Chapter Thirteen Chapter Fourteen Chapter Fifteen Chapter Sixteen Epilogue Photographs Acknowledgments Appendices Notes Index About the Author To Gabriel and Elijah My signals in the noise CAST OF CHARACTERS James Simons Mathematician, code breaker, and founder of Renaissance Technologies Lenny Baum Simons’s first investing partner and author of algorithms that impacted the lives of millions James Ax Ran the Medallion fund and developed its first trading models Sandor Straus Data guru who played key early role at Renaissance Elwyn Berlekamp Game theorist who managed the Medallion fund at a key turning point Henry Laufer Mathematician who moved Simons’s fund toward short-term trades Peter Brown Computer scientist who helped engineer Renaissance’s key breakthroughs Robert Mercer Renaissance’s co-CEO, helped put Donald Trump in the White House Rebekah Mercer Teamed up with Steve Bannon to upend American politics David Magerman Computer specialist who tried to stop the Mercers’ political activities A TIMELINE OF KEY EVENTS 1938 Jim Simons born 1958 Simons graduates MIT 1964 Simons becomes code breaker at the IDA 1968 Simons leads math department at Stony Brook University 1974 Simons and Chern publish groundbreaking paper 1978 Simons leaves academia to start Monemetrics, a currency trading firm, and a hedge fund called Limroy 1979 Lenny Baum and James Ax join 1982 Firm’s name changes to Renaissance Technologies Corporation 1984 Baum quits 1985 Ax and Straus move the company to California 1988 Simons shuts down Limroy, launches the Medallion fund 1989 Ax leaves, Elwyn Berlekamp leads Medallion 1990 Berlekamp departs, Simons assumes control of the firm and fund 1992 Henry Laufer becomes full-time employee 1993 Peter Brown and Robert Mercer join 1995 Brown, Mercer achieve key breakthrough 2000 Medallion soars 98.5 percent 2005 Renaissance Institutional Equities Fund launches 2007 Renaissance and other quant firms suffer sudden losses 2010 Brown and Mercer take over firm 2017 Mercer steps down as co-CEO INTRODUCTION You do know—no one will speak with you, right?”

His efforts, while valuable, raise the question of whether one individual should enjoy so much influence. So, too, does the clout of his senior executive,* Robert Mercer, who is perhaps the individual most responsible for Donald Trump’s presidential victory in 2016. Mercer, Trump’s biggest financial supporter, plucked Steve Bannon and Kellyanne Conway from obscurity and inserted them into the Trump campaign, stabilizing it during a difficult period. Companies formerly owned by Mercer and now in the hands of his daughter Rebekah played key roles in the successful campaign to encourage the United Kingdom to leave the European Union.


pages: 357 words: 94,852

No Is Not Enough: Resisting Trump’s Shock Politics and Winning the World We Need by Naomi Klein

Airbnb, basic income, battle of ideas, Berlin Wall, Bernie Sanders, Brewster Kahle, Celebration, Florida, clean water, collective bargaining, Corrections Corporation of America, desegregation, Donald Trump, drone strike, Edward Snowden, Elon Musk, energy transition, financial deregulation, greed is good, high net worth, Howard Zinn, illegal immigration, impact investing, income inequality, Internet Archive, Kickstarter, late capitalism, Mark Zuckerberg, market bubble, market fundamentalism, mass incarceration, Mikhail Gorbachev, moral panic, Naomi Klein, Nate Silver, new economy, Occupy movement, offshore financial centre, oil shale / tar sands, open borders, Peter Thiel, Plutocrats, plutocrats, private military company, profit motive, race to the bottom, Ralph Nader, Ronald Reagan, Saturday Night Live, sexual politics, sharing economy, Silicon Valley, Steve Bannon, too big to fail, trade liberalization, transatlantic slave trade, Triangle Shirtwaist Factory, trickle-down economics, Upton Sinclair, urban decay, women in the workforce, working poor

Mike Pence: no one-on-one meals with female coworkers Jia Tolentino, “Mike Pence’s Marriage and the Beliefs That Keep Women from Power,” New Yorker, March 31, 2017, http://www.newyorker.com/​culture/​jia-tolentino/​mike-pences-marriage-and-the-beliefs-that-keep-women-from-power. The Ranking of Human Life Steve Bannon and abuse allegations Santa Monica Police Department, crime report, January 1, 1996, http://www.politico.com/​f/​?id=00000156-c3f8-dd14-abfe-fbfbbe310001. Elizabeth Chuck, Ali Vitali, Andrew Blankstein, and Katie Wall, “Trump Campaign CEO Steve Bannon Accused of Anti-Semitic Remarks by Ex-Wife,” NBCNews.com, August 27, 2016, http://www.nbcnews.com/​politics/​2016-election/​trump-campaign-ceo-steve-bannon-accused-anti-semitic-remarks-ex-n638731. Hadas Gold and John Bresnahan, “Trump Campaign CEO Once Charged in Domestic Violence Case,” Politico, August 25, 2016, http://www.politico.com/​story/​2016/​08/​steve-bannon-domestic-violence-case-police-report-227432.

General Dynamics and Boeing to head the department of defense. And the Goldman Sachs guys for pretty much everything that’s left. The handful of career politicians who have been put in charge of agencies seem to have been selected either because they do not believe in the agency’s core mission, or do not think the agency should exist at all. Steve Bannon, Trump’s apparently sidelined chief strategist, was very open about this when he addressed a conservative audience in February 2017. The goal, he said, was the “deconstruction of the administrative state” (by which he meant the government regulations and agencies tasked with protecting people and their rights).

If these kinds of protests spread, more developers could decide to de-Trump themselves. And it’s a fair bet that if his golden name starts disappearing off giant phallic symbols from Vancouver to Manila, Trump would not take it well, nor would his sons, who are reportedly already worried about the damage that senior advisors like Steve Bannon may have done to the family name. In a parallel tactic, when the White House closed down its call-in comment lines in January 2017, one group—whitehouseinc.org—suggested voters phone Trump hotels and resorts and tell whoever answered that they were upset about the president’s plans to take away their health insurance, or any other policy grievances they had.


pages: 382 words: 117,536

March of the Lemmings: Brexit in Print and Performance 2016–2019 by Stewart Lee

Airbnb, AltaVista, anti-communist, Boris Johnson, cognitive dissonance, coherent worldview, Donald Trump, Etonian, New Journalism, Ronald Reagan, Snapchat, Stephen Hawking, Steve Bannon, white flight

If he had his way every politician would be slung in prison and given a taste of what they deserved’ (The Right Honourable Skinhead, Richard Allen, 1981).8 Indeed, Steve Bannon seems to be carrying vast sections of dialogue from The Right Honourable Skinhead around in his head, which spill unbidden from his careless face. Bannon said, off air, to the LBC presenter Theo Usherwood, who had queried his support for Tommy Robinson, ‘Fuck you. Don’t you fucking say you’re calling me out. You fucking liberal elite. Tommy Robinson is the backbone of this country.’9 And on page 103 of The Right Honourable Skinhead, the news magnate Steve Mannon, Robbie Tomlinson’s chief cheerleader, who differs only from Steve Bannon in that he is a Welsh born-again Christian, addresses radio presenter Leo Isherwood thus: ‘Flip you, boyo!

These aren’t the times for self-loathing liberals to seek to understand the leaders of the global far right, or their supporters. That ship sailed when Trump put Breitbart into the White House.8 We should be in crisis-management mode. It’s time to reassert a fundamental principle, namely that there’s no excuse for bigotry, whichever alt-right buzzword you get Boris or Steve Bannon to rebrand it with. And if that means no more free green-room bacon sandwiches on Sunday morning for me, then so be it. We are all going to have to make sacrifices. The role of a comedian is to entertain with humour, not to preach his politics in the misguided belief that they are anything other than a professional entertainer.

It did, but I have changed the names, and I have changed them to different names on different occasions. 7 Every Remain voter has observed evidence of the sudden shift in gear regarding what racists feel they can say in public since the referendum. Someone needs to compile some kind of archive of all this anecdotal material, so we can remember what we were like after Vote Leave uncorked the rage flask. It could be the Domesday Book of low-level anecdotal race hate. 8 In January 2018, just over twelve months later, Trump had Breitbart’s Steve Bannon removed from the White House for criticising him in the book Fire and Fury. As a result, Bannon was free to pursue his avowed intent of creating a global infrastructure for right-wing populism, which appeared to be based on his reading of Richard Allen’s 1970s Skinhead novels. My Paul Nuttalls routine has floated back up the U-bend 4 December 2016 I believe it was a frog who wrote, ‘Explaining a joke is like dissecting the American writer Elwyn Brooks White.


The Road to Unfreedom: Russia, Europe, America by Timothy Snyder

active measures, affirmative action, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, American ideology, anti-globalists, Bernie Sanders, centre right, Charles Lindbergh, crony capitalism, disinformation, Dissolution of the Soviet Union, Donald Trump, hiring and firing, income inequality, John Markoff, means of production, Mikhail Gorbachev, New Journalism, obamacare, offshore financial centre, Robert Mercer, sexual politics, Steve Bannon, Transnistria, WikiLeaks, women in the workforce, zero-sum game

Bannon’s ideology and films: Ronald Radosh, “Steve Bannon, Trump’s Top Guy, Told Me He Was ‘A Leninist’ Who Wants to ‘Destroy the State,’ ” DB, Aug. 22, 2016; Jeremy Peters, “Bannon’s Views Can be Traced to a Book That Warns, ‘Winter Is Coming,’ ” NYT, April 8, 2017; Owen Matthews, “Alexander Dugin and Steve Bannon’s Ideological Ties to Vladimir Putin’s Russia,” NW, April 17, 2017; Christopher Dickey and Asawin Suebsaeng, “Steve Bannon’s Dream: A Worldwise Ultra-Right,” DB, Nov. 13, 2016. Bannon’s films were simplistic Bannon quotation: Wolff, “Ringside with Steve Bannon.” Views: Radosh, “Steve Bannon”; Peters, “Bannon’s Views”; Matthews, “Alexander Dugin.” Bannon on the “treasonous” behavior of Manafort, Kushner, and Donald Trump Jr.: David Smith, “Trump Tower meeting with Russians ‘treasonous,’ Bannon says in explosive book,” TG, Jan. 3, 2018.

Bannon, David Bossie, and Citizens United: Michael Wolff, “Ringside with Steve Bannon at Trump Tower as the President-Elect’s Strategist Plots ‘An Entirely New Political Movement,’ ” Hollywood Reporter, Nov. 18, 2016. Bannon and Mercers: Matthew Kelly, Kate Goldstein, and Nicholas Confessore, “Robert Mercer, Bannon Patron, Is Leaving Helm of $50 Billion Hedge Fund,” NYT, Nov. 2, 2017. Bannon’s extreme-Right ideology Bannon quotation: Owen Matthews, “Alexander Dugin and Steve Bannon’s Ideological Ties to Vladimir Putin’s Russia,” NW, April 17, 2017. Bannon’s ideology and films: Ronald Radosh, “Steve Bannon, Trump’s Top Guy, Told Me He Was ‘A Leninist’ Who Wants to ‘Destroy the State,’ ” DB, Aug. 22, 2016; Jeremy Peters, “Bannon’s Views Can be Traced to a Book That Warns, ‘Winter Is Coming,’ ” NYT, April 8, 2017; Owen Matthews, “Alexander Dugin and Steve Bannon’s Ideological Ties to Vladimir Putin’s Russia,” NW, April 17, 2017; Christopher Dickey and Asawin Suebsaeng, “Steve Bannon’s Dream: A Worldwise Ultra-Right,” DB, Nov. 13, 2016.

Right down to the last, Manafort showed the touch of a true Russian political technologist, not so much denying the facts as changing the subject to a spectacular fiction. On the day the story of his cash payments broke, August 14, 2016, Manafort helped Russia to spread an entirely fictional story about an attack by Muslim terrorists on a NATO base in Turkey. Manafort was replaced as campaign manager by the right-wing ideologue and filmmaker Steve Bannon, whose qualification was that he had brought white supremacists to the mainstream of American discourse. As the director of the Breitbart News Network, Bannon made them household names. America’s leading racists, to a man, admired Trump and Putin. Matthew Heimbach, a defender of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, spoke of Putin as the “leader of the anti-globalist forces around the world,” and of Russia as “the most powerful ally” of white supremacy and as an “axis for nationalists.”


We Need New Stories: Challenging the Toxic Myths Behind Our Age of Discontent by Nesrine Malik

affirmative action, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, barriers to entry, Bernie Sanders, Boris Johnson, British Empire, centre right, cognitive dissonance, continuation of politics by other means, currency peg, disinformation, Donald Trump, feminist movement, financial independence, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, gender pay gap, ghettoisation, glass ceiling, illegal immigration, invisible hand, mass immigration, moral panic, Nate Silver, obamacare, old-boy network, payday loans, planetary scale, Ponzi scheme, race to the bottom, Ronald Reagan, Saturday Night Live, sexual politics, Steve Bannon, Steven Pinker, The Bell Curve by Richard Herrnstein and Charles Murray, Thomas L Friedman, transatlantic slave trade

guccounter=1&guce_referrer=aHR0cHM6Ly93d3cuZ29vZ2xlLmNvbS8&guce_referrer_sig=AQAAAD7POnjWq-aPJ8FxLdeplMTPn2tKzwIxqeEqeVywFBMl6GwkQEQc67pQNvFPNVdRH1pqFxJxv2l2AglC7g-Tw5wuk0cYkF1EuOuT8l8ilx_vbSuX78A3Kufu3hatRCURvz0qZdv75ViU-VripSv2bdvg5Oyc5t9g7vAcI7bbEnda [accessed on 25 July 2019] 116 ‘Don’t you fucking say you’re calling me out’: Sarah Marsh, ‘Steve Bannon calls for Tommy Robinson to be released from prison’ (Guardian, 15 July 2018), https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2018/jul/15/steve-bannon-tommy-robinson-released-from-prison-trump-strategist-lbc-radio-interview [accessed on 25 July 2019] 116 ‘This is exactly the argument they like’: Mark Townsend, ‘#FreeTommy – the making of a far-right English “martyr”’ (Guardian, 29 July 2018), https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2018/jul/29/tommy-robinson-far-right-resurgence-steve-bannon-us-support [accessed on 25 July 2019] 118 ‘free speech grifters’: Mari Uyehara, ‘The Free Speech Grifters’ (GQ, 19 March 2018), https://www.gq.com/story/free-speech-grifting [accessed on 25 July 2019] 118 ‘Given the myopic focus on liberals’: ibid. 119 ‘Free Speech University Ranking’: Tom Slater, ‘Free Speech University Rankings’ (Spiked Online, 24 February 2019), https://www.spiked-online.com/free-speech-university-rankings/ [accessed on 25 July 2019] 119 ‘misleading, ill-informed and worryingly influential’: Carl Thompson, ‘Free Speech Rankings: misleading, ill-informed and worryingly influential’ (Times Higher Education, 17 February 2018) https://www.timeshighereducation.com/blog/free-speech-rankings-misleading-ill-informed-and-worryingly-influential [accessed on 25 July 2019] 119 ‘You’d have to have been living under a rock’: Tom Slater, ‘The poshos pushing campus censorship’ (Telegraph, 19 January 2016), https://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/universityeducation/12108340/The-poshos-pushing-campus-censorship.html [accessed on 25 July 2019] 120 ‘Spiked received six figure donations from the Charles Koch Foundation’: George Monbiot, ‘How US billionaires are fuelling the hard-right cause in Britain’ (Guardian, 7 December 2018), https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/dec/07/us-billionaires-hard-right-britain-spiked-magazine-charles-david-koch-foundation [accessed on 25 July 2019] 120 ‘… overall public support for free speech has in fact, risen over time’: Matthew Yglesias, ‘Everything we think about the political correctness debate is wrong’ (Vox, 12 March 2018), https://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2018/3/12/17100496/political-correctness-data [accessed on 25 July 2019] 121 ‘There is no campus free speech crisis’: Jeffrey Adam Sachs, ‘There is no campus free speech crisis: a close look at the evidence’ (Niskanen Center, 27 April 2018), https://niskanencenter.org/blog/there-is-no-campus-free-speech-crisis-a-close-look-at-the-evidence/ [accessed on 25 July 2019] 123 ‘… suicide by boycott tactic’: Stephanie Saul, ‘The Conservative Force Behind Speeches Roiling College Campuses’ (New York Times, 20 May 2017), https://www.nytimes.com/2017/05/20/us/college-conservative-speeches.html [accessed on 25 July 2019] 123 ‘… a perceived “chilling” of free speech on university campuses’: Rachel Pells, ‘Anti-terror laws “to blame for campus free speech concerns”’ (Times Higher Education, 11 January 2018), https://www.timeshighereducation.com/news/anti-terror-laws-blame-campus-free-speech-concerns [accessed on 25 July 2019] 124 ‘… echoed Amos’: Benjamin Kentish, ‘Universities hit back at Government claims they are restricting free speech’ (Independent, 10 January 2018), https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/university-free-speech-restrictions-hit-back-government-a8152376.html [accessed on 25 July 2019] 124 ‘speaker disinvitation attempts have a higher success rate’: Sean Stevens, Campus Speaker Disinvitation Trends (Part 2 of 2) (Heterodox Academy, 7 February 2017), https://heterodoxacademy.org/campus-speaker-disinvitations-recent-trends-part-2-of-2/ [accessed on 25 July 2019] 126 ‘Today this speech restriction, tomorrow the Inquisition’: Magdalena Jozwiak, ‘Internet, Freedom of Speech and Slippery Slope Argument – The Case of the “Right to Be Forgotten”’, (SSRN, 22 March 2018), https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?

He was aware that he would go to prison if he broke the law again. It was suicide by contempt of court. What ensued was a campaign for his release that was based on the lie that his freedom of speech had been violated. A petition drew half a million signatures and far-right European leaders came to his support. Steve Bannon, former Trump strategist and alt-right publisher, almost came to blows with a London radio journalist who challenged him on his support for Robinson. ‘Fuck you,’ Bannon barked. ‘Don’t you fucking say you’re calling me out. You fucking liberal elite. Tommy Robinson is the backbone of this country.’

Even David Duke, a KKK grand wizard (I repeat this point because it bears repeating) was scandalised by the suggestion that race had anything to do with his campaign. Allegations of racism were a ‘smear’, he responded to his supporters. ‘Remember,’ he told them at rallies, ‘when they smear me, they are really smearing you.’ There’s an uncanny echo of that in a speech by Steve Bannon, Trump’s former strategist, to a crowd at a French National Front rally in Lille almost thirty years later: ‘Let them call you racists,’ he said. ‘Let them call you xenophobes. Let them call you nativists. Wear it as a badge of honour.’ Allegations of racism, according to Bannon, speaking to supporters of a far-right party that had proposed that jobs be first offered to ‘native’ French people before immigrants (a measure that is thought by constitutional experts to be unconstitutional and has been judged by French law to be unlawful), were just bad faith slurs.


pages: 157 words: 53,125

The Fifth Risk by Michael Lewis

Albert Einstein, Bernie Sanders, Biosphere 2, chief data officer, cloud computing, Donald Trump, Ferguson, Missouri, Silicon Valley, Steve Bannon, tail risk, the new new thing, uranium enrichment

They only ever rejected one person, Paul Manafort’s secretary.” The first time Donald Trump paid attention to any of this was when he read about it in the newspaper. The story revealed that Trump’s very own transition team, led by New Jersey governor Chris Christie, had raised several million dollars to pay the staff. The moment he saw it, Trump called Steve Bannon, the chief executive of his campaign, from his office, on the twenty-sixth floor of Trump Tower, and told him to come immediately to his residence, many floors above. Bannon stepped off the elevator to find the governor of New Jersey seated on a sofa, being hollered at. Trump was apoplectic, actually yelling, You’re stealing my money!

The national security team inside the Trump transition—staffed with senior former military and intelligence officials—had thought that an especially bad idea. Flynn’s name wasn’t on the list. But here he was, in the meeting to decide who would do what in the Trump administration, and Ivanka was asking him which job he’d like to have. Before Christie could intercede, Steve Bannon grabbed him and asked to see him privately. Christie followed Bannon to his office impatiently. Hey, this is going to have to be quick, said Christie. It’s really quick, said Bannon. You’re out. Why? asked Christie, stunned. We’re making a change. Okay, what are we changing? You. Why? It’s really not important.

The method of his execution was unsurprising: Trump always avoided firing people himself. The man who played Mr. You’re Fired on TV avoided personal confrontation in real life. The surprise was that it was being done now, just when the work of the transition team was most critical. Only when Christie threatened to go down and tell reporters that Steve Bannon had fired him did Bannon concede, “It was Jared.” In the days after the election, the people in the building on Seventeenth and Pennsylvania were meant to move to another building in downtown Washington, a kind of White House-in-waiting. They soon discovered that the lists that they had created of people to staff the Trump administration were not the lists that mattered.


pages: 173 words: 52,725

How to Be Right: In a World Gone Wrong by James O'Brien

Boris Johnson, clockwatching, collective bargaining, death of newspapers, Donald Trump, game design, housing crisis, mass immigration, Plutocrats, plutocrats, post-industrial society, QAnon, ride hailing / ride sharing, sexual politics, Steve Bannon, young professional

Their private beliefs about people from countries or cultures other than their own are demonstrably racist, they just don’t like being told so. I’m not sure why, and I suspect the next chapter in these ludicrous, social media-fuelled ‘culture wars’ will see more and more people take the advice that Donald Trump’s former consigliere, Steve Bannon, gave to French fascists to wear the accusation of racism with ‘pride’fn1. For now, the kindest thing you can do in the circumstances is invite them to say whatever they want with a promise that you won’t call them names. Three or four years after I first assumed the position behind the microphone, I was told by a caller from the London borough of Hounslow that he wasn’t allowed to say what he really thought about immigration because of political correctness.

Muslim listeners generally respond to calls like this by pointing out that they’re too busy doing the school run to be waging war against the kuffir. Or that they were going to do a bit of jihad, but something good dropped on Netflix. It is, for my money, the British way to respond to such misguided fury – with disarming humour, but Donald Trump and Steve Bannon have shown what a powerful political force that misguided fury can be when properly harnessed. James: And you think they’ll say yes. Frank: No. James: So what do we do with all the ones who say no? The ones who don’t cough immediately to being secret jihadists, hellbent upon destroying Western civilisation.

But Trump, for me, is more symptom than disease. His political success was made possible by creating an environment of fear and loathing into which he could insert himself as saviour and protector. Historians of the future will marvel at how the malign influence of ‘news’ sources like Breitbart, run by Trump’s consigliere Steve Bannon, could have gone unchecked for so long. They will point out that nobody really objected when Trump decried facts as ‘fake news’ but anointed the Infowars loon, Alex Jones, as reliable even after Jones had described the Sandy Hook school massacre as a hoax and the parents of dead children as hoaxers.


pages: 524 words: 130,909

The Contrarian: Peter Thiel and Silicon Valley's Pursuit of Power by Max Chafkin

3D printing, affirmative action, Airbnb, anti-communist, bank run, Bernie Sanders, bitcoin, borderless world, charter city, cloud computing, cognitive dissonance, coronavirus, Covid-19, COVID-19, Credit Default Swap, cryptocurrency, David Brooks, David Graeber, disinformation, don't be evil, Donald Trump, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, Elon Musk, Ethereum, Extropian, facts on the ground, Ferguson, Missouri, Frank Gehry, Gordon Gekko, guest worker program, Haight Ashbury, helicopter parent, hockey-stick growth, illegal immigration, immigration reform, Internet Archive, Jeff Bezos, John Markoff, Kickstarter, life extension, Lyft, Marc Andreessen, Mark Zuckerberg, Maui Hawaii, Menlo Park, moral panic, move fast and break things, move fast and break things, Nelson Mandela, Network effects, off grid, offshore financial centre, oil shale / tar sands, open borders, paypal mafia, Peter Thiel, pets.com, Plutocrats, plutocrats, Ponzi scheme, prosperity theology / prosperity gospel / gospel of success, QAnon, quantitative hedge fund, quantitative trading / quantitative finance, randomized controlled trial, regulatory arbitrage, Renaissance Technologies, reserve currency, ride hailing / ride sharing, risk tolerance, Ronald Reagan, Sam Altman, Sand Hill Road, self-driving car, sharing economy, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley ideology, Silicon Valley startup, skunkworks, software is eating the world, sovereign wealth fund, Steve Bannon, Steve Jobs, Steven Levy, Stewart Brand, surveillance capitalism, TaskRabbit, technology bubble, technoutopianism, Ted Kaczynski, the new new thing, the scientific method, Tim Cook: Apple, transaction costs, Travis Kalanick, Uber and Lyft, uber lyft, Upton Sinclair, We wanted flying cars, instead we got 140 characters, Whole Earth Catalog, WikiLeaks, William Shockley: the traitorous eight, Y Combinator, Y2K, yellow journalism

The move helped turn a tide of negative press and added to the coffers of a campaign that would buy a barrage of targeted Facebook advertisements as part of a voter suppression strategy designed to discourage potential Clinton supporters. After the election, Thiel was feted by Trump’s inner circle and given an office in Trump Tower, along with the latitude to install his allies in the new administration. “He was something unique,” recalled Steve Bannon, who became CEO of the campaign in August. He praised Thiel for bringing intellectual credibility and seriousness to a campaign that struggled at times to convey either. To Bannon and others on the Trumpist right, Thiel was a hero, a key enabler of Trump’s unexpected win. To the left, Thiel was uniquely villainous—a Silicon Valley power broker who’d helped hook Americans on a collection of tech services, then used his influence over those services to elect a candidate who promised to ban Muslims from entering the United States and to deport millions of undocumented immigrants.

Despite the haughty-sounding name, the company had little to do with Cambridge University—in fact, its office was in London—but Nix’s plan had been to market ideas that had been developed at Cambridge about using people’s Facebook data to guess their personality type. He would raise money from Steve Bannon and the ultra-conservative Mercer family, led by the patriarch Bob, who’d gotten rich at a quantitative hedge fund, and his daughter Rebekah. The Mercers were backers of Bannon’s news outlet, Breitbart, and had invested in Nix’s pitch to adapt the Facebook concept for use in electoral politics, enabling political campaigns to scan someone’s social network profile, predict who they were going to vote for, and serve them ads to get them to show up to the polls.

He would suddenly have a chance to spend it. 15 OUT FOR TRUMP In his initial assessment of the jockeying for the Republican nomination for the 2016 presidential race, Thiel had thrown his weight behind Carly Fiorina, a well-known tech executive who’d been on the cover of Fortune magazine’s “Most Powerful Women” issue in 1998 when she was a senior executive at Lucent Technologies, the telecommunications equipment business spun off from AT&T, and who had later served as CEO of Hewlett-Packard. “She was the only one who understood what a fucking algorithm was,” said Steve Bannon. “That’s his kindred soul.” But Thiel hadn’t been entirely enamored of Fiorina. Her business career had ended disastrously in 2005, after she pushed HP to acquire Compaq, just as the personal computer industry was beginning to contract. The merger is now considered by many to be one of the worst business deals in modern history and coincided with several waves of layoffs.


pages: 236 words: 62,158

Marx at the Arcade: Consoles, Controllers, and Class Struggle by Jamie Woodcock

4chan, Alexey Pajitnov wrote Tetris, anti-work, augmented reality, barriers to entry, battle of ideas, Boris Johnson, Build a better mousetrap, butterfly effect, call centre, collective bargaining, Columbine, conceptual framework, cuban missile crisis, David Graeber, deindustrialization, deskilling, Donald Trump, game design, gig economy, glass ceiling, global supply chain, global value chain, Hacker Ethic, Howard Zinn, Ian Bogost, independent contractor, John Conway, Kickstarter, Landlord’s Game, late capitalism, Marshall McLuhan, means of production, microaggression, Minecraft, mutually assured destruction, Naomi Klein, Oculus Rift, pink-collar, sexual politics, Silicon Valley, Steve Bannon, union organizing, unpaid internship, V2 rocket

print=1. 12Tremblay, “Intro to Gender Criticism for Gamers.” 13Lien, “No Girls Allowed.” 14Torill Elvira Mortensen, “Anger, Fear, and Games: The Long Event of #GamerGate,” Games and Culture 13, no. 8 (2016): 787–806. 15Paulo Ruffino, “Parasites to Gaming: Learning from GamerGate” (paper, Proceedings of 1st International Joint Conference of DiGRA and FDG, Dundee, UK, 2016). 16Cherie Todd, “Commentary: GamerGate and Resistance to the Diversification of Gaming Culture,” Women’s Studies Journal 29, no. 1 (2015): 64. 17Mortensen, “Anger, Fear, and Games,” 14. 18Jake Swearingen, “Steve Bannon Saw the ‘Monster Power’ of Angry Gamers While Farming Gold in World of Warcraft,” New York, July 18, 2017, http://nymag.com/intelligencer/2017/07/steve-bannon-world-of-warcraft-gold-farming.html. 19Joshua Green, Devil’s Bargain: Steve Bannon, Donald Trump, and the Storming of the Presidency (New York: Penguin, 2017), 81. 20Angela Nagle, Kill All Normies: Online Culture Wars from 4chan and Tumblr to Trump and the Alt-Right (Winchester: Zero Books, 2017); Matt Lees, “What Gamergate Should Have Taught Us about the ‘Alt-Right,’” Guardian, December 1, 2016, www.theguardian.com/technology/2016/dec/01/gamergate-alt-right-hate-trump. 21Robert Purchese, “ArenaNet Fires Two Guild Wars 2 Writers over Twitter Exchange with YouTuber,” Eurogamer, July 7, 2018, www.eurogamer.net/articles/2018-07-06-arenanet-fires-two-guild-wars-2-writers-over-twitter-exchange-with-youtuber. 22Quoted in Keith Stuart, “Richard Bartle: We Invented Multiplayer Games as a Political Gesture,” Guardian, November 17, 2014, www.theguardian.com/technology/2014/nov/17/richard-bartle-multiplayer-games-political-gesture.

In 2014, it became covered more widely in the media, which began to discuss a “culture war” taking place over videogames.16 The “Gamergaters” thus formed a virtual mob, directed against alternative voices, criticism, and new forms of representation in videogames. That Gamergate transpired highlights that “playing games is not an isolated event.”17 While these events made little sense to people outside of videogames, they did make sense to some of the people on the periphery of the industry. For example, Steve Bannon, who helped to run Breitbart News and then joined the Trump administration, developed a close knowledge of gamer culture through his involvement in the World of Warcraft gold-mining company Internet Gaming Entertainment (IGE).18 The company employed Chinese workers to grind through repetitive tasks to earn ingame money and items, which would then be sold to wealthier players, mainly in the US.


pages: 122 words: 38,022

Kill All Normies: Online Culture Wars From 4Chan and Tumblr to Trump and the Alt-Right by Angela Nagle

4chan, A Declaration of the Independence of Cyberspace, affirmative action, anti-communist, battle of ideas, Bernie Sanders, bitcoin, citizen journalism, crony capitalism, death of newspapers, Donald Trump, feminist movement, game design, Hacker Ethic, Herbert Marcuse, hive mind, Julian Assange, Kickstarter, mass immigration, moral panic, Nelson Mandela, Norman Mailer, Occupy movement, open borders, post-industrial society, pre–internet, Ronald Reagan, sexual politics, Silicon Valley, Steve Bannon, The Wisdom of Crowds, WikiLeaks

It is perhaps the single biggest success story of right-wing alternative media, with celebrities like Milo, its editor Steve Bannon rising to the top of US politics and figures like Allum Bokhari rising from relative obscurity to having meetings with the president. Bannon himself described the site as a ‘platform for the alt-right’, though he undoubtedly meant this in the looser sense of a new anti-establishment right, aligned with the European populist right and the US Trumpian right. After the election, Buzzfeed published a transcript of a long interview Steve Bannon gave to the Vatican from 2004. Presumably thinking this was a ready-made hit-piece that would destroy his reputation, Bannon came across in the interview as darkly fascinating and, relative to many Buzzfeed listicle writers, as quite a serious and intriguing person.

But what few on the left were paying attention to in the years leading up to Trump’s election, and really throughout the entire Obama administration, was the alt-light building a multilayered alternative online media empire that would dwarf many of the above. This stretched from white nationalist bloggers in its sparsely populated corners to the charismatic YouTubers and Twitter celebrities in its more popular form. These included right-wing outsiders such as Steve Bannon who, through building a publication like Breitbart, became chief strategist to the US president. YouTube vloggers produced an abundance of popular commentary videos and ‘SJW cringe compilations’, while alt-light celebrities like Milo built careers from exposing the absurdities of the kind of Tumblr identity politics that had gone mainstream through listicle sites like Buzzfeed and anti-free speech safe space campus politics.


pages: 282 words: 81,873

Live Work Work Work Die: A Journey Into the Savage Heart of Silicon Valley by Corey Pein

23andMe, 4chan, affirmative action, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Airbnb, Amazon Mechanical Turk, Anne Wojcicki, artificial general intelligence, bank run, barriers to entry, Benevolent Dictator For Life (BDFL), Bernie Sanders, bitcoin, Bitcoin Ponzi scheme, Build a better mousetrap, California gold rush, cashless society, colonial rule, computer age, cryptocurrency, data is the new oil, disruptive innovation, Donald Trump, Douglas Hofstadter, Elon Musk, Extropian, gig economy, Google bus, Google Glasses, Google X / Alphabet X, hacker house, hive mind, illegal immigration, immigration reform, independent contractor, Internet of things, invisible hand, Isaac Newton, Jeff Bezos, job automation, Kevin Kelly, Khan Academy, Law of Accelerating Returns, Lean Startup, life extension, Lyft, Mahatma Gandhi, Marc Andreessen, Mark Zuckerberg, Menlo Park, minimum viable product, move fast and break things, move fast and break things, mutually assured destruction, obamacare, passive income, patent troll, Paul Graham, peer-to-peer lending, Peter H. Diamandis: Planetary Resources, Peter Thiel, platform as a service, Plutocrats, plutocrats, Ponzi scheme, post-work, Ray Kurzweil, regulatory arbitrage, rent control, RFID, Robert Mercer, rolodex, Ronald Reagan, Ross Ulbricht, Ruby on Rails, Sam Altman, Sand Hill Road, Scientific racism, self-driving car, sharing economy, side project, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, Singularitarianism, Skype, Snapchat, social software, software as a service, source of truth, South of Market, San Francisco, Startup school, stealth mode startup, Steve Bannon, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, TaskRabbit, technological singularity, technoutopianism, telepresence, too big to fail, Travis Kalanick, tulip mania, Uber for X, uber lyft, ubercab, upwardly mobile, Vernor Vinge, X Prize, Y Combinator

Katherine Bolan Forrest Yannick Losbar, “Ross Ulbricht Silk Road Trial Judge Facing Death Threats on Dark Net,” October 20, 2014, cryptocoinsnews.com; Rich Calder, “Judge in Silk Road Case Gets Death Threats,” October 24, 2014, nypost.com. His name became more familiar J. Lester Feder, “This Is How Steve Bannon Sees the Entire World,” November 15, 2016, buzzfeed.com; Jason Horowitz, “Steve Bannon Cited Italian Thinker Who Inspired Fascists,” February 10, 2017, nytimes.com. Dale Carrico Amor Mundi, “Anissimov’s Jolt to the Far Right,” March 5, 2014, amormundi.blogspot.com. Chapter VIII: Onward, Robot Soldiers Page invited Kurzweil to join the company David J.

He was the PayPal founder, Facebook board member, major shareholder in a CIA-funded company, Donald Trump delegate, distinguished Stanford alumnus, venture capitalist, and Silicon Valley billionaire Peter Thiel. Here was a rich, powerful man, regarded by many as a public intellectual, who, three years before White House adviser Steve Bannon declared war on “the administrative state,” was willing to say, regarding the “monolithic monstrosity” of government, that “breaking it down is probably an improvement.” Tech’s most dangerous billionaire was born in Germany to conservative Christian evangelicals. His father was a chemical engineer who worked for international mining companies.

A favorite of postwar fascist terrorist groups throughout Europe, Evola had written a book called Fascism Viewed from the Right, in which he argued that Hitler and Mussolini failed because they were not extreme enough, and too populist. Evola favored a return to aristocracy. His name became more familiar in the American mainstream after then Breitbart chairman Steve Bannon (who would go on to become Trump’s campaign strategist and White House adviser) mentioned the heretofore obscure writer’s name in a BuzzFeed interview. As one scholar of right-wing traditionalism later told the New York Times, “The fact that Bannon even knows Evola is significant.” It was more than significant—it was alarming.


pages: 309 words: 79,414

Going Dark: The Secret Social Lives of Extremists by Julia Ebner

23andMe, 4chan, Airbnb, anti-communist, anti-globalists, augmented reality, Ayatollah Khomeini, bitcoin, blockchain, Boris Johnson, citizen journalism, cognitive dissonance, crowdsourcing, cryptocurrency, disinformation, Donald Trump, Elon Musk, feminist movement, game design, glass ceiling, Google Earth, job satisfaction, Mark Zuckerberg, mass immigration, Menlo Park, Mikhail Gorbachev, Network effects, off grid, pattern recognition, pre–internet, QAnon, RAND corporation, ransomware, rising living standards, self-driving car, Silicon Valley, Skype, Snapchat, social intelligence, Steve Bannon, Steve Jobs, Transnistria, WikiLeaks, zero day

Available at https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-manchester-47335414. 11‘Trump supporter attacks BBC cameraman at El Paso rally’, BBC, 12 February 2019. Available at https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-47208909. 12See for example Sophie McBain, ‘What Steve Bannon Really Believes In’, New Statesman, 12 September 2018. Available at https://www.newstatesman.com/world/north-america/2018/09/what-steve-bannon-really-believes. 13Betsy Woodruff, ‘The Secret Heiress Funding the Right-Wing Media’, Daily Beast, 13 September 2016. Available at https://www.thedailybeast.com/the-secret-heiress-funding-the-right-wing-media. 14Paul P. Murphy, Kaya Yurieff and Gianluca Mezzofiore, ‘Exclusive: YouTube ran ads from hundreds of brands on extremist channels’, CNN, 20 April 2018.

Around 4,000 protesters gathered outside the BBC headquarters in Manchester on a Saturday afternoon in February 2019 to watch his ‘Panodrama documentary’ and call for the BBC licence fee to be scrapped.10 Just days before the ‘Panodrama’ premiered, a Trump supporter attacked a BBC cameraman covering a rally in El Paso, Texas.11 Tommy Robinson is just one of many self-framed journalists who are confronting the ‘lying press’ with innovative and transgressive means. Alternative news outlets and right-wing YouTube vloggers are increasingly well networked – with initiatives like Steve Bannon’s The Movement attempting to empower and connect them,12 and right-leaning donors such as the Horowitz Foundation and the Mercer Family Foundation supporting them financially.13 But a big proportion of alternative media’s funding sources, as with all popular websites, comes from advertising.14 When German brand strategist Gerald Hensel sat down one Saturday morning in 2016 to pen a blog piece about brands buying ads and banners on far-right websites, he did not expect that this would set in motion a life-changing series of events.

Notes 1: whites only 1For analysis see Elisabetta Cassini Wolff, ‘Evola’s interpretation of fascism and moral responsibility’, Patterns of Prejudice 50(4–5), 2016, pp. 478–94. 2Stanley G. Payne, A History of Fascism: 1914–1945 (Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1995). 3Richard Drake, The Revolutionary Mystique and Terrorism in Contemporary Italy (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1989). 4Jason Horowitz, ‘Steve Bannon Cited Italian Thinker Who Inspired Facsists’, New York Times, 10 Febuary 2017. Available at https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/10/world/europe/bannon-vatican-julius-evola-fascism.html. 5Ibid. 6Antonio Regalado, ‘2017 was the year consumer DNA testing blew up’, MIT Review, February 2018. Available at https://www.technologyreview.com/s/610233/2017-was-the-year-consumer-dna-testing-blew-up/. 7Aaron Panofsky and Joan M.


pages: 339 words: 103,546

Blood and Oil: Mohammed Bin Salman's Ruthless Quest for Global Power by Bradley Hope, Justin Scheck

augmented reality, Ayatollah Khomeini, clean water, coronavirus, distributed generation, Donald Trump, Downton Abbey, Elon Musk, Exxon Valdez, Google Earth, high net worth, Jeff Bezos, Marc Andreessen, Mark Zuckerberg, MITM: man-in-the-middle, new economy, Peter Thiel, ride hailing / ride sharing, Sand Hill Road, Silicon Valley, South of Market, San Francisco, sovereign wealth fund, starchitect, Steve Bannon, Steve Jobs, Tim Cook: Apple, trade route, Travis Kalanick, Uber for X, urban planning, WeWork, women in the workforce, young professional, zero day

Cast of Characters The Al Saud King Salman bin Abdulaziz Al Saud, son of the kingdom’s founder and father of Mohammed bin Salman Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman Al Saud Prince Khalid bin Salman Al Saud, Mohammed’s younger brother and former ambassador to the United States Sultana bint Turki Al Sudairi, King Salman’s first wife Fahdah bint Falah al-Hithlain, King Salman’s third wife and mother of Mohammed bin Salman Crown Prince Muqrin bin Abdulaziz Al Saud, King Salman’s half brother and briefly heir apparent Crown Prince Mohammed bin Nayef Al Saud, King Salman’s nephew and a longtime antiterrorism official close to the US government King Abdullah bin Abdulaziz Al Saud, King Salman’s half brother and predecessor Prince Miteb bin Abdullah Al Saud, King Abdullah’s son and former chief of the Saudi Arabia National Guard Prince Turki bin Abdullah Al Saud, the seventh son of King Abdullah Prince Badr bin Farhan Al Saud, a prince from a distant branch of the family, minister of culture, and a longtime friend of Mohammed bin Salman Prince Abdullah bin Bandar Al Saud, another prince and longtime friend of Mohammed bin Salman and head of the National Guard Prince Sultan bin Turki Al Saud, the son of one of King Salman’s brothers, and an outspoken prince whose criticisms got him into trouble with more powerful members of the family The Palace Khalid al-Tuwaijri, the head of King Abdullah’s Royal Court Mohammed al-Tobaishi, King Abdullah’s chief of protocol Rakan bin Mohammed al-Tobaishi, Mohammed bin Salman’s protocol chief and the son of Mohammed al-Tobaishi The MBS Entourage Bader al-Asaker, a longtime associate of Mohammed who runs his private foundation Saud al-Qahtani, an advisor to Mohammed who specializes in quashing dissent Turki Al Sheikh, a longtime companion of Mohammed who has brought foreign sports and entertainment events to Saudi Arabia The Region Mohammed bin Zayed Al Nahyan, crown prince of Abu Dhabi Tahnoon bin Zayed, Abu Dhabi national security advisor Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani, emir of Qatar Hamad bin Khalifa Al Thani, former emir of Qatar Abdel Fattah el-Sisi, president of Egypt Saad Hariri, prime minister of Lebanon Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, president of Turkey Residents of the Ritz Prince Alwaleed bin Talal Al Saud, a cousin of Mohammed and Saudi Arabia’s most prominent international businessman Adel Fakeih, a Saudi businessman who became minister of economy and planning Hani Khoja, a Saudi management consultant Mohammed Hussein Al Amoudi, a Saudi businessman with holdings in Ethiopia Ali al-Qahtani, a general Bakr bin Laden, scion of the bin Laden construction family The Critics Jamal Khashoggi, newspaper columnist with a long history of working for and sometimes criticizing the Saudi government Omar Abdulaziz, Canada-based dissident who criticizes Saudi leadership in online videos Loujain al-Hathloul, women’s rights activist who violated Saudi law by trying to drive into the kingdom from the United Arab Emirates The US Government President Donald Trump Jared Kushner, Ivanka Trump’s husband and an advisor to the president Steve Bannon, former Trump advisor Rex Tillerson, ex-CEO of ExxonMobil, later US secretary of state The Businessmen Jeff Bezos, founder and CEO of Amazon.com David Pecker, CEO of American Media, which publishes the National Enquirer Ari Emanuel, Hollywood agent and cofounder of Endeavor talent agency Masayoshi Son, CEO of Japanese tech investor SoftBank Rajeev Misra, head of SoftBank’s Vision Fund Nizar al-Bassam, Saudi deal maker and a former international banker Kacy Grine, independent banker and confidant of Alwaleed bin Talal A note on naming: In the Saudi convention, a man is identified through a patrilineal naming system.

Chapter 8 Little Sparta December 2016 Discarding his white robes for a buttoned-up dress shirt and aviator sunglasses, the muscled crown prince of Abu Dhabi, Mohammed bin Zayed, arrived for a secret meeting at Manhattan’s Trump Tower looking like an Arab James Bond. The group receiving him was unlike anything he’d seen in his years of diplomacy with the United States, his closest Western ally and protector. On one side was Steve Bannon, the former banker and right-wing media executive whose fraying fleeces over two or three layers of collared shirts, reddened cheeks, shaggy gray hair, and tendency to pontificate on the ancient past gave him the air of a rumpled, though deeply reactionary, professor. Then there was Jared Kushner, the trim real estate heir married to Ivanka Trump, who once told Bannon on a flight that he didn’t think experts with a deep understanding of the past were necessarily the best people to plot out the geopolitical future.

Skeptical Westerners were still writing with ridicule about Abdulaziz bin Baz, the former Saudi grand mufti who denied that the Earth orbits the sun until a Saudi, King Salman’s older son Sultan, returned from a voyage on a US space shuttle and assured bin Baz that the Earth does indeed rotate on its axis and revolve around the sun. Mohammed’s two willing partners in the remade US alliance would be the same men MBZ met in Trump Tower, Steve Bannon and Jared Kushner. They realized they needed to erase the Islamophobia charge to get Arab support for their top Middle East priorities. For Bannon that was punishing Iran, while Kushner needed backing for a Palestine peace deal. The young real estate executive loved the idea that he could find a way to bring peace to the Middle East with old-fashioned business sense and horse trading.


Hiding in Plain Sight: The Invention of Donald Trump and the Erosion of America by Sarah Kendzior

"side hustle", 4chan, Bear Stearns, Berlin Wall, Bernie Sanders, borderless world, Chelsea Manning, Columbine, corporate raider, desegregation, disinformation, don't be evil, Donald Trump, drone strike, Edward Snowden, Ferguson, Missouri, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, hiring and firing, illegal immigration, income inequality, Jaron Lanier, Jeff Bezos, Jeffrey Epstein, Julian Assange, Mohammed Bouazizi, Naomi Klein, Nelson Mandela, new economy, payday loans, Plutocrats, plutocrats, QAnon, Robert Hanssen: Double agent, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, Skype, Steve Bannon, Thomas L Friedman, trickle-down economics, unpaid internship, white flight, WikiLeaks, Y2K, zero-sum game

The media whom Trump called his enemy acted like his best friend, airing his rallies in full, letting his lies linger, and treating the prospect of his win as a joke or a ratings boon. Throughout 2016, hate crimes rose as Trump rebranded racism as populism and recruited white supremacists from the dregs of the GOP (like Jeff Sessions) and the extreme right (like Steve Bannon) to join his campaign. All anyone needed to see Trump as a potential American autocrat were their own eyes. His desire to dismantle democracy was out in the open. He did not bother to hide his goals because he knew few believed he could achieve them. That sort of thing does not happen here, commentators scoffed, citing checks and balances and centuries of democratic stability.

In summer 2014, writers Shafiqah Hudson and l’Nasah Crockett launched the hashtag #YourSlipIsShowing to expose accounts impersonating black users and making obnoxious political claims.16 Many of these accounts were later revealed to be Russian troll accounts seeking to map the US political landscape and prepare to influence the 2016 election.17 Other trolls were right-wing users in the United States linked to the Russian effort: Steve Bannon (then the editor of Breitbart) and Cambridge Analytica were experimenting with social media to see how social groups could be manipulated online for political gain. According to Cambridge Analytica whistle-blower Christopher Wylie, Bannon asked employees to “test messaging around Russian President Vladimir Putin and Russian expansion.”18 However, few in power paid attention—in part because social media companies almost never took seriously the most common targets, women of color.

New right-wing websites trafficked in racist propaganda, which was then echoed by the Tea Party at rallies and online. The website Breitbart, established in Israel in 2007 by the American libertarian Andrew Breitbart,27 became more bigoted and conspiracy-oriented after Breitbart died suddenly in 2012 and was replaced with future Trump campaign manager Steve Bannon. But the peddling of the birther myth was not limited to right-wing extremist sites. As I mentioned in chapter 2, in the early days of the internet most news sites were a replication of print. While flawed in many ways, this system still employed fact-checking as a standard practice. During the 2000s, print media and online media coexisted uneasily, with the latter often being dismissed as inherently unreliable.


pages: 364 words: 119,398

Men Who Hate Women: From Incels to Pickup Artists, the Truth About Extreme Misogyny and How It Affects Us All by Laura Bates

4chan, Ada Lovelace, Boris Johnson, cognitive dissonance, coherent worldview, Dominic Cummings, Donald Trump, feminist movement, Filter Bubble, gender pay gap, glass ceiling, Grace Hopper, job satisfaction, Kickstarter, off grid, recommendation engine, ride hailing / ride sharing, Snapchat, Steve Bannon, young professional

, The Conversation, 14 November 2017 29 ‘Betsy DeVos Plans to Consult Men’s Rights Trolls About Campus Sexual Assault’, Slate, 11 July 2017 30 ‘The so-called “manosphere” is peopled with hundreds of websites, blogs and forums dedicated to savaging feminists in particular and women, very typically American women, in general’, Southern Poverty Law Center, 2012 31 ‘Steve Bannon: Five Things to Know’, ADL 32 ‘How Donald Trump’s New Campaign Chief Created an Online Haven for White Nationalists’, Mother Jones, August 2016 33 ‘White Nationalists Rejoice Trump’s Appointment of Breitbart’s Stephen Bannon’ Southern Poverty Law Center, 14 November 2016 34 ‘The horror, the horror’, Tortoise, 3 April 2019 35 ‘Only a proper Brexit can spare us from this toxic polarisation’, Daily Telegraph, 15 April 2019 36 ‘Steve Bannon: ‘We went back and forth’ on the themes of Johnson’s big speech’, The Guardian, 22 June 2019 37 ‘MPs’ fury at Boris Johnson’s “dangerous language”, BBC, 25 September 2019 38 ‘Man arrested outside office of Labour MP Jess Phillips’, The Guardian, 26 September 2019 39 ‘Trump defends response to Charlottesville violence, says he put it “perfectly” with “both sides” remark’, USA Today, 26 April 2019 40 ‘Dominic Cummings: Anger at MPs “not surprising”, PM’s adviser says’, BBC, 27 September 2019 41 ‘Labour MP calls for end to online anonymity after “600 rape threats” ’, The Guardian, 11 June 2018 42 ‘Ukip MEP candidate blamed feminists for rise in misogyny’, The Guardian, 22 April 2019 43 ‘Police investigate Ukip candidate over Jess Phillips rape comments’, The Guardian, 7 May 2019 44 ‘Under Siege For His Comments About Rape, UKIP’s Star Candidate Carl Benjamin Has Recruited Milo Yiannopoulos To Join His Campaign’, BuzzFeed, 8 May 2019 45 ‘Steve Bannon Targeted “Incels” Because They Are “Easy To Manipulate,” Cambridge Analytica Whistleblower Says’, Newsweek, 29 October 2019 46 ‘Reddit’s TheRedPill, notorious for its misogyny, was founded by a New Hampshire state legislator’, Vox, 28 April 2017 47 ‘Red Pill Boss: All Feminists Want to Be Raped’, Daily Beast, 29 November 2017 48 ‘New Hampshire State Rep Who Created Reddit’s “Red Pill” Resigns’, Daily Beast, 22 May 2017 49 ‘Jordan Peterson & Fascist Mysticism’, New York Review of Books, 19 March 2019 50 ‘Op-Ed: Hate on Jordan Peterson all you want, but he’s tapping into frustration that feminists shouldn’t ignore’, Los Angeles Times, 1 June 2018 51 ‘Jordan Peterson: “I don’t think that men can control crazy women” ’, The Varsity, 8 October 2018 52 ‘Why Can’t People Hear What Jordan Peterson Is Saying?’

Some of these men are cashing in on trends driven by manosphere communities, perhaps without even realising who they are appealing to. For others, the decision to appeal to certain groups seems to be more deliberate. For political figures like Donald Trump and his advisers, such as former chief strategist Steve Bannon, there are gains to be made by issuing dog whistles to the alt-right and manosphere communities. Such rhetoric, like Trump’s derisive advice to four Democratic American citizens and congresswomen of colour to ‘go back’ to the countries from which they originally came, is greeted with wild applause across the masses frequenting extremist websites.1 But a buffer of plausible deniability is also important, in order to avoid alienating a more mainstream base: a feat achieved by publicly disavowing racism and white supremacy, even while his own statements seem to send a very different message.2 For many of the other figureheads idolised, quoted and supported by the foot soldiers of the manosphere, it is also richly profitable to maintain the sympathy and loyalty of these communities, while actually holding them (either genuinely or performatively) in contempt.

In particular, d’Ancona suggested a direct link between Bannon’s apparent strategic input and Johnson’s Islamophobic and misogynistic newspaper piece. Soon afterwards, d’Ancona later revealed, he was bombarded with angry calls from Johnson. ‘I stopped counting at 15 – though the calls continued,’ he wrote in an article for news outlet Tortoise.34 ‘Boris Johnson was furious with me for writing about his contact with Steve Bannon.’ Specifically, according to d’Ancona, Johnson was furious that the journalist had linked Bannon’s advice to his column. In other words, he seemed desperate to avoid the inference that Bannon’s input had led him to spout classic manosphere and alt-right rhetoric in the mainstream press. Writing in his column, Johnson bristled that claims of any association between him and Bannon were a conspiracy theory and a ‘lefty delusion’.35 ‘Of course I met Mr Bannon a couple of times when I was foreign secretary and he was Trump’s chief of staff,’ Johnson wrote, ‘but not since.’


pages: 364 words: 119,398

Men Who Hate Women by Laura Bates

4chan, Ada Lovelace, Boris Johnson, cognitive dissonance, coherent worldview, Dominic Cummings, Donald Trump, feminist movement, Filter Bubble, gender pay gap, glass ceiling, Grace Hopper, job satisfaction, Kickstarter, off grid, recommendation engine, ride hailing / ride sharing, Snapchat, Steve Bannon, young professional

, The Conversation, 14 November 2017 29 ‘Betsy DeVos Plans to Consult Men’s Rights Trolls About Campus Sexual Assault’, Slate, 11 July 2017 30 ‘The so-called “manosphere” is peopled with hundreds of websites, blogs and forums dedicated to savaging feminists in particular and women, very typically American women, in general’, Southern Poverty Law Center, 2012 31 ‘Steve Bannon: Five Things to Know’, ADL 32 ‘How Donald Trump’s New Campaign Chief Created an Online Haven for White Nationalists’, Mother Jones, August 2016 33 ‘White Nationalists Rejoice Trump’s Appointment of Breitbart’s Stephen Bannon’ Southern Poverty Law Center, 14 November 2016 34 ‘The horror, the horror’, Tortoise, 3 April 2019 35 ‘Only a proper Brexit can spare us from this toxic polarisation’, Daily Telegraph, 15 April 2019 36 ‘Steve Bannon: ‘We went back and forth’ on the themes of Johnson’s big speech’, The Guardian, 22 June 2019 37 ‘MPs’ fury at Boris Johnson’s “dangerous language”, BBC, 25 September 2019 38 ‘Man arrested outside office of Labour MP Jess Phillips’, The Guardian, 26 September 2019 39 ‘Trump defends response to Charlottesville violence, says he put it “perfectly” with “both sides” remark’, USA Today, 26 April 2019 40 ‘Dominic Cummings: Anger at MPs “not surprising”, PM’s adviser says’, BBC, 27 September 2019 41 ‘Labour MP calls for end to online anonymity after “600 rape threats” ’, The Guardian, 11 June 2018 42 ‘Ukip MEP candidate blamed feminists for rise in misogyny’, The Guardian, 22 April 2019 43 ‘Police investigate Ukip candidate over Jess Phillips rape comments’, The Guardian, 7 May 2019 44 ‘Under Siege For His Comments About Rape, UKIP’s Star Candidate Carl Benjamin Has Recruited Milo Yiannopoulos To Join His Campaign’, BuzzFeed, 8 May 2019 45 ‘Steve Bannon Targeted “Incels” Because They Are “Easy To Manipulate,” Cambridge Analytica Whistleblower Says’, Newsweek, 29 October 2019 46 ‘Reddit’s TheRedPill, notorious for its misogyny, was founded by a New Hampshire state legislator’, Vox, 28 April 2017 47 ‘Red Pill Boss: All Feminists Want to Be Raped’, Daily Beast, 29 November 2017 48 ‘New Hampshire State Rep Who Created Reddit’s “Red Pill” Resigns’, Daily Beast, 22 May 2017 49 ‘Jordan Peterson & Fascist Mysticism’, New York Review of Books, 19 March 2019 50 ‘Op-Ed: Hate on Jordan Peterson all you want, but he’s tapping into frustration that feminists shouldn’t ignore’, Los Angeles Times, 1 June 2018 51 ‘Jordan Peterson: “I don’t think that men can control crazy women” ’, The Varsity, 8 October 2018 52 ‘Why Can’t People Hear What Jordan Peterson Is Saying?’

Some of these men are cashing in on trends driven by manosphere communities, perhaps without even realising who they are appealing to. For others, the decision to appeal to certain groups seems to be more deliberate. For political figures like Donald Trump and his advisers, such as former chief strategist Steve Bannon, there are gains to be made by issuing dog whistles to the alt-right and manosphere communities. Such rhetoric, like Trump’s derisive advice to four Democratic American citizens and congresswomen of colour to ‘go back’ to the countries from which they originally came, is greeted with wild applause across the masses frequenting extremist websites.1 But a buffer of plausible deniability is also important, in order to avoid alienating a more mainstream base: a feat achieved by publicly disavowing racism and white supremacy, even while his own statements seem to send a very different message.2 For many of the other figureheads idolised, quoted and supported by the foot soldiers of the manosphere, it is also richly profitable to maintain the sympathy and loyalty of these communities, while actually holding them (either genuinely or performatively) in contempt.

In particular, d’Ancona suggested a direct link between Bannon’s apparent strategic input and Johnson’s Islamophobic and misogynistic newspaper piece. Soon afterwards, d’Ancona later revealed, he was bombarded with angry calls from Johnson. ‘I stopped counting at 15 – though the calls continued,’ he wrote in an article for news outlet Tortoise.34 ‘Boris Johnson was furious with me for writing about his contact with Steve Bannon.’ Specifically, according to d’Ancona, Johnson was furious that the journalist had linked Bannon’s advice to his column. In other words, he seemed desperate to avoid the inference that Bannon’s input had led him to spout classic manosphere and alt-right rhetoric in the mainstream press. Writing in his column, Johnson bristled that claims of any association between him and Bannon were a conspiracy theory and a ‘lefty delusion’.35 ‘Of course I met Mr Bannon a couple of times when I was foreign secretary and he was Trump’s chief of staff,’ Johnson wrote, ‘but not since.’


pages: 382 words: 105,819

Zucked: Waking Up to the Facebook Catastrophe by Roger McNamee

4chan, Albert Einstein, algorithmic trading, AltaVista, Amazon Web Services, barriers to entry, Bernie Sanders, Bill Atkinson, Boycotts of Israel, Cass Sunstein, cloud computing, computer age, cross-subsidies, data is the new oil, disinformation, Donald Trump, Douglas Engelbart, Douglas Engelbart, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, Elon Musk, Filter Bubble, game design, Ian Bogost, income inequality, Internet of things, Jaron Lanier, Jeff Bezos, John Markoff, laissez-faire capitalism, Lean Startup, light touch regulation, Lyft, Marc Andreessen, Mark Zuckerberg, market bubble, Menlo Park, Metcalfe’s law, minimum viable product, Mother of all demos, move fast and break things, move fast and break things, Network effects, paypal mafia, Peter Thiel, pets.com, post-work, profit maximization, profit motive, race to the bottom, recommendation engine, Robert Mercer, Ronald Reagan, Sand Hill Road, self-driving car, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, Skype, Snapchat, social graph, software is eating the world, Stephen Hawking, Steve Bannon, Steve Jobs, Steven Levy, Stewart Brand, The Chicago School, The future is already here, Tim Cook: Apple, two-sided market, Uber and Lyft, Uber for X, uber lyft, Upton Sinclair, WikiLeaks, Yom Kippur War

The Guardian story opened with a bang: The data analytics firm that worked with Donald Trump’s election team and the winning Brexit campaign harvested millions of Facebook profiles of US voters, in one of the tech giant’s biggest ever data breaches, and used them to build a powerful software program to predict and influence choices at the ballot box. A whistleblower has revealed to the Observer how Cambridge Analytica—a company owned by the hedge fund billionaire Robert Mercer, and headed at the time by Trump’s key adviser Steve Bannon—used personal information taken without authorisation in early 2014 to build a system that could profile individual US voters, in order to target them with personalised political advertisements. Christopher Wylie, who worked with a Cambridge University academic to obtain the data, told the Observer: “We exploited Facebook to harvest millions of people’s profiles.

In the world of market research, there is considerable doubt about how well psychographics work in their current form, but that issue did not prevent Cambridge Analytica from finding clients, mostly on the far right. To serve the US market, SCL needed to obey federal election laws. It created a US affiliate staffed by US citizens and legal residents. Reports indicated that Cambridge Analytica took a casual approach to regulations. The team of Robert Mercer and Steve Bannon financed and organized Cambridge Analytica, with Alexander Nix as CEO. The plan was to get into the market within a few months, test capabilities during the 2014 US midterm elections, and, if successful, transform American politics in 2016. To be confident that their models would work, Nix and his team needed a ton of data.

Kaiser transferred into Cambridge Analytica and went to work bringing in clients. Her early clients were in Africa, but in 2015 she and Nix shifted their focus to the United States in anticipation of the presidential election cycle. Kaiser asserted that Nix was not a political ideologue—unlike his patrons Robert Mercer and Steve Bannon—and hoped to create a “famous advertising company in the US market.” As quoted in The Guardian: “Corporations like Google, Facebook, Amazon, all of these large companies, are making tens or hundreds of billions of dollars off of monetising people’s data,” Kaiser says. “I’ve been telling companies and governments for years that data is probably your most valuable asset.


pages: 93 words: 30,572

How to Stop Brexit (And Make Britain Great Again) by Nick Clegg

Berlin Wall, Boris Johnson, collapse of Lehman Brothers, Dominic Cummings, Donald Trump, eurozone crisis, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, offshore financial centre, sceptred isle, Snapchat, Steve Bannon

Through articles and public platforms, such bodies63 have played a part in supporting and promoting the likes of Nigel Farage, far-right French presidential candidate Marine Le Pen and her Dutch counterpart, Geert Wilders. Following Donald Trump’s election as US President, this ideology now echoes strongly on both sides of the Atlantic. When Trump became President, he employed Steve Bannon as his White House Chief Strategist (he has since departed). Bannon previously ran the alt-right media outlet Breitbart in Washington and helped to set up its London branch, where he appointed one Raheem Kassam (later a chief of staff to Farage, and briefly a candidate to succeed him as UKIP leader) to edit the site.

Neilan, ‘Business Leaders to Push David Davis for Clarity Tomorrow at Chevening Meeting’, City A.M., 6th July 2017 63. Such groups include the Heritage Foundation, the Gatestone Institute and the David Horowitz Freedom Center 64. L. Kaufman, ‘Breitbart News Network Plans Global Expansion’, www.nytimes.com, 16th February 2014 65. J. Lester Feder, ‘This is How Steve Bannon Sees the Entire World’, www.buzzfeed.com, 15th November 2016 66. For the full transcript of the interview with Donald Trump, see www.thetimes.co.uk, 16th January 2017 67. J. Pickard and J. Garrahan, ‘Rupert Murdoch Secretly Sat in on Interview with Donald Trump’, Financial Times, 9th February 2017 68.


pages: 371 words: 109,320

News and How to Use It: What to Believe in a Fake News World by Alan Rusbridger

airport security, basic income, Boris Johnson, call centre, Chelsea Manning, citizen journalism, Climategate, cognitive dissonance, coronavirus, correlation does not imply causation, Covid-19, COVID-19, Credit Default Swap, cross-subsidies, crowdsourcing, disinformation, Dominic Cummings, Donald Trump, Edward Snowden, Filter Bubble, future of journalism, ghettoisation, global pandemic, Google Earth, hive mind, housing crisis, Howard Rheingold, illegal immigration, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Jeff Bezos, Jeffrey Epstein, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Julian Assange, Kickstarter, Mark Zuckerberg, Murray Gell-Mann, Narrative Science, Neil Kinnock, Nelson Mandela, New Journalism, Nicholas Carr, offshore financial centre, profit motive, publication bias, Seymour Hersh, Snapchat, Steve Bannon, the scientific method, universal basic income, WikiLeaks, yellow journalism

Sales were helped by an excerpt published before its release by Wolff’s old employer New York Magazine, which contained details such as Steve Bannon claiming that Trump didn’t trust John Bolton because of his moustache. Wolff had unprecedented access for Fire and Fury, which was said to be based on two hundred interviews with Trump and his senior staff. Although Trump tweeted that Wolff never had access to the White House, Sarah Huckabee Sanders admitted that Wolff had more than a dozen ‘interactions’ with officials at the White House, at the request of Steve Bannon. The White House quickly pushed back on the book, in which Bannon described Donald Trump Jr’s 2016 meeting with Russians at Trump Tower as ‘treasonous’ and ‘unpatriotic’ and called Ivanka ‘dumb as a brick’.

Otherwise, the next world war might begin with a grainy, contested image launched online from some distant and inaccessible outpost right onto the pages of a newspaper that has recently sacked all its journalists.’ ‘FLOOD THE ZONE WITH SHIT’ The phrase is attributed to the former head of Breitbart News, Steve Bannon, who briefly had a role in the inner circle of the Trump White House. ‘The Democrats don’t matter,’ Bannon reportedly said in 2018. ‘The real opposition is the media. And the way to deal with them is to flood the zone with shit.’ As explained by Vox’s Sean Illing: ‘The press ideally should sift fact from fiction and give the public the information it needs to make enlightened political choices.

The hacking and leaking of internal Democratic Party communications during the 2016 US election were simply one high-profile symptom of the new warfare, which saw widespread covert political disinformation as well as the use of troll farms and bots to infiltrate and sway public debate. In some ways Putin’s agenda was not dissimilar from the tactics used by Donald Trump, Steve Bannon and other populists in seeking to undermine faith in any kind of evidence-based reality. If you can, for instance, convince enough people that the New York Times is completely fake, then (they imply) you might as well believe Bannon’s reality, and Trump’s alternative facts. The targets of disinformation are not always the obvious ones.


pages: 297 words: 83,651

The Twittering Machine by Richard Seymour

4chan, anti-communist, augmented reality, Bernie Sanders, Cal Newport, Cass Sunstein, Chelsea Manning, citizen journalism, colonial rule, correlation does not imply causation, credit crunch, crowdsourcing, disinformation, don't be evil, Donald Trump, Elon Musk, Erik Brynjolfsson, Filter Bubble, Google Chrome, Google Earth, hive mind, informal economy, Internet of things, invention of movable type, invention of writing, Jaron Lanier, Jony Ive, Kevin Kelly, knowledge economy, late capitalism, liberal capitalism, Mark Zuckerberg, Marshall McLuhan, meta-analysis, Mohammed Bouazizi, moral panic, move fast and break things, move fast and break things, Network effects, new economy, packet switching, patent troll, Philip Mirowski, post scarcity, post-industrial society, RAND corporation, Rat Park, rent-seeking, replication crisis, sentiment analysis, Shoshana Zuboff, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley ideology, smart cities, Snapchat, Steve Bannon, Steve Jobs, Stewart Brand, Stuxnet, surveillance capitalism, TaskRabbit, technoutopianism, the scientific method, Tim Cook: Apple, undersea cable, upwardly mobile, white flight, Whole Earth Catalog, WikiLeaks

This cultivated ambiguity, this hedging of a serious political agenda with statements ostensibly made just for the lulz, indicates where trolling could fit into the psychic and political economy of the alt-right. Breitbart, the far-right website which subsequently became Yiannopoulos’s regular outlet until his downfall, was also annexed to the Trump campaign. Steve Bannon, then chair of Breitbart News, signed up to the campaign after former Fox executive Roger Ailes became a Trump adviser. And it arguably pioneered a form of in-real-life trolling that serves its reactionary purposes, with its two best-known scoops: the sting against the liberal civil society organization, ACORN, and the framing of African-American Department of Agriculture employee Shirley Sherrod.

Notably, while much alt-right trolling reheats anti-communist paranoia along with traditional fascist ideas, pro-Trump trolling campaigns are often aimed at conservatives who are critical of the alt-right. When The Daily Beast reported that Breitbart incited ‘hate mobs’ to threaten and dox critics on the Right, then editor Steve Bannon disavowed any responsibility. Trolling is an effective weapon precisely because responsibility for it is diffuse and ambiguous. Nonetheless, Bannon gloried in the site’s reputation for thuggishness. When an insider described Andrew Breitbart as ‘the kind of people who, if you accidentally brushed against their shopping cart in the supermarket, their response is to burn down your house’, Bannon was delighted.58 He explained: ‘If a guy comes after our audience. . . we’re going to leave a mark.

On his trade war with China, he has raised tariffs, but the total levels still remain historically low. Much of what he has achieved required the connivance of Congressional Republicans, such as the standard Republican tax cut for the rich, or the promotion of a hard-right Federalist Society judge to the Supreme Court. Unsurprisingly, by the summer of 2017, Trump’s ousted ally Steve Bannon lamented that the presidency the far right ‘fought for, and won, is over’. The difficulty faced by the far right is that political success has outrun social and political organization. Historically, the far right has succeeded by building roots in thick networks of civic associations, from fraternal organizations in the US South to veteran and military clubs in Germany.55 It has, in this context, developed a ‘grass-roots’ paramilitary presence to control the streets.


pages: 1,066 words: 273,703

Crashed: How a Decade of Financial Crises Changed the World by Adam Tooze

Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Apple's 1984 Super Bowl advert, Asian financial crisis, asset-backed security, bank run, banking crisis, Basel III, Bear Stearns, Berlin Wall, Bernie Sanders, Big bang: deregulation of the City of London, bond market vigilante , Boris Johnson, break the buck, Bretton Woods, BRICs, British Empire, business cycle, capital controls, Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty, Carmen Reinhart, Celtic Tiger, central bank independence, centre right, collateralized debt obligation, corporate governance, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, currency manipulation / currency intervention, currency peg, dark matter, deindustrialization, desegregation, Detroit bankruptcy, Dissolution of the Soviet Union, diversification, Doha Development Round, Donald Trump, Edward Glaeser, Edward Snowden, en.wikipedia.org, energy security, eurozone crisis, Fall of the Berlin Wall, family office, financial intermediation, fixed income, Flash crash, forward guidance, friendly fire, full employment, global reserve currency, global supply chain, global value chain, Goldman Sachs: Vampire Squid, Growth in a Time of Debt, housing crisis, Hyman Minsky, illegal immigration, immigration reform, income inequality, interest rate derivative, interest rate swap, Kenneth Rogoff, large denomination, light touch regulation, Long Term Capital Management, margin call, Martin Wolf, McMansion, Mexican peso crisis / tequila crisis, mittelstand, money market fund, moral hazard, mortgage debt, mutually assured destruction, negative equity, new economy, Nixon triggered the end of the Bretton Woods system, Northern Rock, obamacare, Occupy movement, offshore financial centre, oil shale / tar sands, old-boy network, open economy, paradox of thrift, Peter Thiel, Ponzi scheme, Post-Keynesian economics, predatory finance, price stability, private sector deleveraging, purchasing power parity, quantitative easing, race to the bottom, reserve currency, risk tolerance, Ronald Reagan, Savings and loan crisis, savings glut, secular stagnation, Silicon Valley, South China Sea, sovereign wealth fund, special drawing rights, Steve Bannon, structural adjustment programs, tail risk, The Great Moderation, Tim Cook: Apple, too big to fail, trade liberalization, upwardly mobile, Washington Consensus, We are the 99%, white flight, WikiLeaks, women in the workforce, Works Progress Administration, yield curve, éminence grise

Bendery, “John Boehner on Debt Ceiling: Let’s Pay China First, Then US Troops,” Huffington Post, May 8, 2013. 55. J. Cohn, “Don’t Blame the Tea Party for the Shutdown. Blame Boehner,” New Republic, September 30, 2013. 56. S. M. Burwell, “Impacts and Costs of the Government Shutdown,” White House archives, November 7, 2013. 57. R. Radosh, “Steve Bannon, Trump’s Top Guy, Told Me He Was ‘a Leninist,’” Daily Beast, August 22, 2016. 58. A. Crooke, “Steve Bannon’s Apocalyptic ‘Unravelling,’” Consortium News, March 9, 2017. 59. G. Steinhauser, “Europe Enjoys ‘Shutdownfreude’ over US Debt Troubles,” Wall Street Journal, October 16, 2013. 60. M. Hujer and D. Sander, “US Fumbling Puts China at Risk,” Der Spiegel, October 22, 2013. 61.

Levy, “Robert Lighthizer’s Global Trade Governance Critique,” Forbes, December 12, 2017. 108. “US Broadside Leaves WTO Meeting in Tatters,” Deutsche Welle, December 12, 2017. 109. K. McNamara, “Trump Takes Aim at the European Union: Why the EU Won’t Unify in Response,” Foreign Affairs, January 24, 2017. 110. E.-K. Symons, “Steve Bannon Loves France,” Politico, March 22, 2017, and C. Alduy, “The Novel That Unites Marine Le Pen and Steve Bannon,” Politico, April 23, 2017. 111. D. Frum, “Trump’s Trip Was a Catastrophe for US-Europe Relations,” Atlantic, May 28, 2017. 112. J. Henley, “Angela Merkel: EU Cannot Completely Rely on US and Britain Any More,” Guardian, May 28, 2017. 113.

The radical right wing of the Republican Party, xenophobic nationalists, many of them evangelical zealots, motivated by a worldview fashioned by the alt-right, or Pat Buchanan’s extreme America-first nationalism, a group whose hard core accounted for 10 percent of the House of Representatives, had threatened to paralyze the most important nation-state in the global system. As Steve Bannon, the editor of the Breitbart news site, a cheerleader of the Tea Party and a rising star of the alt-right, gushed to a Daily Beast journalist in November 2013: “I’m a Leninist. Lenin wanted to destroy the state, and that’s my goal too. I want to bring everything crashing down, and destroy all of today’s establishment.”57 For the likes of Bannon, the crisis of 2008 and the bailout had marked a fundamental caesura in American history.


pages: 223 words: 58,732

The Retreat of Western Liberalism by Edward Luce

"Robert Solow", 3D printing, affirmative action, Airbnb, basic income, Berlin Wall, Bernie Sanders, Boris Johnson, Branko Milanovic, Bretton Woods, business cycle, call centre, carried interest, centre right, Charles Lindbergh, cognitive dissonance, colonial exploitation, colonial rule, computer age, corporate raider, cuban missile crisis, currency manipulation / currency intervention, disinformation, Dissolution of the Soviet Union, Doha Development Round, Donald Trump, double entry bookkeeping, Erik Brynjolfsson, European colonialism, everywhere but in the productivity statistics, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, future of work, George Santayana, gig economy, Gini coefficient, global pandemic, global supply chain, illegal immigration, imperial preference, income inequality, independent contractor, informal economy, Internet of things, Jaron Lanier, knowledge economy, lateral thinking, liberal capitalism, Marc Andreessen, Mark Zuckerberg, Martin Wolf, mass immigration, means of production, microaggression, Monroe Doctrine, moral panic, more computing power than Apollo, mutually assured destruction, new economy, New Urbanism, Norman Mailer, offshore financial centre, one-China policy, Peace of Westphalia, Peter Thiel, Plutocrats, plutocrats, precariat, purchasing power parity, reserve currency, reshoring, Richard Florida, Robert Gordon, Ronald Reagan, Second Machine Age, self-driving car, sharing economy, Silicon Valley, Skype, Snapchat, software is eating the world, South China Sea, Steve Bannon, Steve Jobs, superstar cities, telepresence, The Rise and Fall of American Growth, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thomas L Friedman, Tyler Cowen: Great Stagnation, universal basic income, unpaid internship, Washington Consensus, We are the 99%, We wanted flying cars, instead we got 140 characters, white flight, World Values Survey, Yogi Berra

‘[The] new Kremlin won’t make the same mistake the old Soviet Union did: it will never let TV become dull,’ writes Peter Pomerantsev. ‘Most [Russians] are happy with the trade-off: complete freedom for complete silence.’63 Short of martial law, the US media is highly unlikely to be silenced, or co-opted, by Trump. When Steve Bannon, Trump’s senior White House adviser, who helped pioneer much of the fake news that helped Trump to win, told Washington’s journalists to shut up, he was met with derision.64 Yet he was echoing a popular view in the heartland about an industry that has suffered an even steeper fall in its credibility than the political classes.

Part Three: Fallout 1 Jake Sherman, ‘Poll: voters liked Trump’s “America First” address’, Politico, 25 January 2017, <http://www.politico.com/story/2017/01/poll-voters-liked-trumps-inaugural-address-234148>. 2 Dana Priest, ‘The disruptive career of Michael Flynn, Trump’s national-security adviser’, New Yorker, 23 November 2016, <http://www.newyorker.com/news/news-desk/the-disruptive-career-of-trumps-national-security-adviser>. 3 J. Lester Feder, ‘This is how Stephen Bannon sees the entire world’, Buzzfeed, 16 November 2016. Transcript of a 2014 speech by Bannon via Skype to a conference in the Vatican in 2014: <https://www.buzzfeed.com/lesterfeder/this-is-how-steve-bannon-sees-the-entire-world>. 4 I am indebted to Jonathan David Kirshner, of Cornell University, whose paper ‘Keynes’s Early Beliefs and Why They Still Matter’ (Challenge, 58:5 (October 2015)) brilliantly elucidates the evolution in Keynes’s thinking. 5 Graham Allison, ‘The Thucydides Trap: Are the US and China Headed for War?’


pages: 170 words: 49,193

The People vs Tech: How the Internet Is Killing Democracy (And How We Save It) by Jamie Bartlett

Ada Lovelace, Airbnb, Amazon Mechanical Turk, Andrew Keen, autonomous vehicles, barriers to entry, basic income, Bernie Sanders, bitcoin, blockchain, Boris Johnson, central bank independence, Chelsea Manning, cloud computing, computer vision, creative destruction, cryptocurrency, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, disinformation, Dominic Cummings, Donald Trump, Edward Snowden, Elon Musk, Filter Bubble, future of work, gig economy, global village, Google bus, hive mind, Howard Rheingold, information retrieval, Internet of things, Jeff Bezos, job automation, John Maynard Keynes: technological unemployment, Julian Assange, manufacturing employment, Mark Zuckerberg, Marshall McLuhan, Menlo Park, meta-analysis, mittelstand, move fast and break things, move fast and break things, Network effects, Nicholas Carr, off grid, Panopticon Jeremy Bentham, payday loans, Peter Thiel, prediction markets, QR code, ransomware, Ray Kurzweil, recommendation engine, Renaissance Technologies, ride hailing / ride sharing, Robert Mercer, Ross Ulbricht, Sam Altman, Satoshi Nakamoto, Second Machine Age, sharing economy, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley ideology, Silicon Valley startup, smart cities, smart contracts, smart meter, Snapchat, Stanford prison experiment, Steve Bannon, Steve Jobs, Steven Levy, strong AI, surveillance capitalism, TaskRabbit, technological singularity, technoutopianism, Ted Kaczynski, the medium is the message, the scientific method, The Spirit Level, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, The Wisdom of Crowds, theory of mind, too big to fail, ultimatum game, universal basic income, WikiLeaks, World Values Survey, Y Combinator, you are the product

The idea was to figure out how to apply these techniques to politics – and especially to help the Republican Party, which Mercer felt had fallen behind the Democrats in their digital campaigning.9 Mercer invested a load of money into the new company. Cambridge was also part of a tight pro-Trump network: Steve Bannon, until recently boss of Breitbart and Trump’s first head of strategy, was also a board member of Cambridge Analytica until he joined the administration. From their inception Cambridge Analytica followed the Mercer bible. They built up a database of around 5,000 data points on some 230 million Americans.

Baldwin-Philippi (2017), ‘The myths of data-driven campaigning’, Political Communication, 34(4), 627-633. 23 Tamsin Shaw, ‘Invisible Manipulators of Your Mind’, New York Review of Books, 20 April 2017. 24 Francis Fukuyama, Political Order and Political Decay, (Profile, 2014). 25 Carole Cadwalladr, ‘Vote Leave donations: the dark ads, the mystery “letter” – and Brexit’s online guru’, www.theguardian.com, 25 November 2017. 26 Tom Hamburger, ‘Cruz campaign credits psychological data and analytics for its rising success’, www.washingtonpost.com, 13 December 2015. 27 Matea Gold and Frances Stead Sellers, ‘After working for Trump’s campaign, British data firm eyes new U.S. government contracts’, www.washingtonpost.com, 17 February 2017. 28 Carole Cadwalladr, ‘I made Steve Bannon’s psychological warefare tool’, Observer, 18 March 2018. 29 Nina Burleigh, ibid. 30 Lucy Handley, ‘Personalized TV commercials are coming to a screen near you; US marketers to spend $3 billion on targeted ads’, www.cnbc.com, 15 August 2017. 31 E. Goodman, S. Labo, M. Moore and D. Tambini, ibid. 32 Vyacheslav Poonski, ‘How artificial intelligence silently took over democracy’, www.weforum.org, 9 August 2017. 33 Jonathan Albright, ‘Who Hacked the Election?


pages: 324 words: 96,491

Messing With the Enemy: Surviving in a Social Media World of Hackers, Terrorists, Russians, and Fake News by Clint Watts

4chan, active measures, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, barriers to entry, Berlin Wall, Bernie Sanders, Chelsea Manning, Climatic Research Unit, crowdsourcing, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, disinformation, Donald Trump, drone strike, Edward Snowden, en.wikipedia.org, Erik Brynjolfsson, failed state, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Filter Bubble, global pandemic, Google Earth, illegal immigration, Internet of things, Julian Assange, loss aversion, Mark Zuckerberg, Mikhail Gorbachev, mobile money, mutually assured destruction, obamacare, Occupy movement, offshore financial centre, pre–internet, side project, Silicon Valley, Snapchat, Steve Bannon, The Wisdom of Crowds, Turing test, University of East Anglia, Valery Gerasimov, WikiLeaks, Yochai Benkler, zero day

Social media nations and their members will cast doubt on experts who oppose the hidden core, insulate themselves from challengers through clickbait populism, and unwittingly support policies detrimental to their own well-being. In some ways this has already happened, with companies like Cambridge Analytica and the propaganda machine of Steve Bannon coming together during the election of 2016 to convince poor, working-class southern and midwestern whites to vote for a New York City real estate developer and reality TV star named Donald Trump. The “hidden core” conducting social inception will win over key influencers by mapping their every purchase, chat, post, and picture, creating a targeting profile to nudge unwitting “useful idiots”—those enticed by money and ego—to advance scripted narratives.

Republicans already openly push for their own apps to bring supporters to an online world of their own design. The National Rifle Association, the pro-Trump political action committee America First, and Senator Ted Cruz’s Cruz Crew seek a conservative social media world similar to their Fox News television universe.43 Curiously, Cambridge Analytica cofounder and former Trump adviser Steve Bannon not only echoes these sentiments but called for nationalizing Facebook.44 For me, this seems like an odd position for a voracious capitalist who seeks the end of the administrative state. Taking down the tech giants opens enormous space for the strongest manipulators to take hold of unwitting minds; Bannon would be one of those best positioned to gain from their demise.

utm_term=.3446fd4e2ff3. 40. https://www.wired.com/story/how-whatsapp-fuels-fake-news-and-violence-in-india/. 41. https://www.politico.com/story/2018/03/22/election-security-bill-congress-437472. 42. https://www.politico.eu/article/internet-governance-facebook-google-splinternet-europe-net-neutrality-data-protection-privacy-united-states-u-s/. 43. https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/20/technology/politics-apps-conservative-republican.html. 44. https://www.vanityfair.com/news/2018/08/steve-bannon-big-data-facebook-twitter-google. About the Author CLINT WATTS is a Robert A. Fox Fellow in the Foreign Policy Research Institute’s Program on the Middle East as well as a senior fellow at the Center for Cyber and Homeland Security at the George Washington University. Discover great authors, exclusive offers, and more at hc.com.


pages: 399 words: 114,787

Dark Towers: Deutsche Bank, Donald Trump, and an Epic Trail of Destruction by David Enrich

Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, anti-globalists, Asian financial crisis, banking crisis, Bear Stearns, Berlin Wall, buy low sell high, collateralized debt obligation, commoditize, corporate governance, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, Donald Trump, East Village, estate planning, Fall of the Berlin Wall, financial innovation, forensic accounting, high net worth, housing crisis, interest rate derivative, interest rate swap, Jeffrey Epstein, London Interbank Offered Rate, Lyft, Mikhail Gorbachev, NetJets, obamacare, offshore financial centre, post-materialism, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Renaissance Technologies, risk tolerance, Robert Mercer, rolodex, sovereign wealth fund, Steve Bannon, too big to fail, transcontinental railway, yield curve

The world’s oldest bank had been reduced to ruins, and Deutsche’s fingerprints were all over the wreckage. Chapter 32 Rosemary Is the Boss The American presidential campaign was entering its homestretch, and the man in charge of Donald Trump’s chaotic candidacy was happily anticipating the mayhem that would be unleashed if Deutsche continued to unravel. Steve Bannon, who had made a small fortune working at Goldman Sachs, was an unlikely populist, but he had watched with boiling fury as millions of people lost their homes and their savings during the financial crisis. His father was one of the victims, having seen his retirement fund wiped out. Triggered, Bannon recast himself as a fiery destroyer of the globalist order.

He added that he was eager for emails or documents related to Renaissance Technologies—the huge hedge fund that Deutsche had worked with to help save it billions in taxes. Simpson was especially curious about any materials on Renaissance’s enigmatic leader, Robert Mercer, who along with his daughter Rebekah had become a leading financier of Trump, Steve Bannon, and Breitbart News. “Be safe and I will see you tomorrow,” Simpson signed off. The weather in Saint Thomas was balmy, and Val and Glenn alternated between sifting through Bill’s files in a hotel suite and sitting at a picnic table on the beach, drinking beers and smoking cigarettes. Simpson was slightly manic, chattering constantly about Trump and Fusion’s financial struggles and the high likelihood that, at that very moment, they were under government surveillance.

Foundation’s yearly distribution had shriveled: Rachel Sanderson, “Siena Faces Life after 500 Years of Monte dei Paschi Largesse,” Financial Times, August 2, 2016. 32. Rosemary Is the Boss Interviews with Mike Offit, Tammy McFadden, other Deutsche employees and executives, and journalists who interviewed several characters (and related emails and transcripts). Bannon’s radicalization: Michael C. Bender, “Steve Bannon and the Making of an Economic Nationalist,” Wall Street Journal, March 14, 2017. Kushner’s biggest lending facility: Kushner financial documents, reviewed by New York Times. Kushner’s loan for old New York Times building: Will Parker, “Jared Kushner Looks to Be Still Tied Up in 229 West 43rd Street Retail Condo,” The Real Deal, March 6, 2017.


The Next Great Migration by Sonia Shah

Berlin Wall, British Empire, colonial rule, dematerialisation, demographic transition, Donald Trump, en.wikipedia.org, European colonialism, failed state, Fellow of the Royal Society, Garrett Hardin, hive mind, illegal immigration, immigration reform, index card, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), mass immigration, meta-analysis, Nelson Mandela, open borders, out of africa, Scientific racism, sensible shoes, Silicon Valley, Steve Bannon, trade route, Tragedy of the Commons, urban sprawl

In the novel “swarthy hordes” of Indian migrants, described as “grotesque little beggars from the streets of Calcutta” who eat feces, invade France, force white women to work in brothels, and engage in orgies involving men, women, and children. The far-right French leader Marine Le Pen kept a dedicated copy in her desk. The former Breitbart chairman Steve Bannon considered the novel prescient and visionary. He suggested that the flow of migrants across the Mediterranean Sea would create a similarly horrific social meltdown. He called it an “almost Camp of the Saints–type invasion.” Tanton’s organizations reconstructed the Fortress America55 that Grant and Osborn had built.

His Treasury secretary agreed: “He’s got perfect genes.” The Trump family, one of Trump’s sons said, subscribed to the “racehorse theory” of inheritance, which “places a high value on bloodlines.” They referred to the inferior biology of people of African descent, as Linnaeus had. “Some people,” noted Trump adviser Steve Bannon, in reference to black people shot by police, are “naturally aggressive and violent.” “Laziness is a trait in blacks,” Trump said. “Some people cannot, genetically, handle pressure,” he added. “Go out in nature,” said a Republican nominee for Illinois representative, “and you don’t find equality anywhere … I don’t believe in this doctrine of racial equality.”59 They implied that mixing biologically distinct peoples60 disrupted the natural order, as early twentieth-century eugenicists had. “ ‘Diversity’ is not our strength,” one of President Trump’s national security officials wrote.

Brower and a faction of anti-immigration activists Leon Kolankiewicz, “Homage to Iconic Conservationist David Brower Omits Population,” Californians for Population Stabilization, March 25, 2014, https://www.capsweb.org/blog/homage-iconic-conservationist-david-brower-omits-population. The Camp of the Saints Cécile Alduy, “What a 1973 French Novel Tells Us About Marine Le Pen, Steve Bannon, and the Rise of the Populist Right,” Politico, April 23, 2017; Normandin and Valles, “How a Network of Conservationists”; K. C. McAlpin, “ ‘The Camp of the Saints’ Revisited—Modern Critics Have Justified the Message of a 1973 Novel on Mass Immigration,” Social Contract Journal, Summer 2017. Tanton’s organizations reconstructed the Fortress America DeParle, “Anti-Immigration Crusader”; Normandin and Valles, “How a Network of Conservationists.”


pages: 691 words: 203,236

Whiteshift: Populism, Immigration and the Future of White Majorities by Eric Kaufmann

4chan, affirmative action, Amazon Mechanical Turk, anti-communist, anti-globalists, augmented reality, battle of ideas, Berlin Wall, Bernie Sanders, Boris Johnson, British Empire, centre right, Chelsea Manning, cognitive dissonance, complexity theory, corporate governance, correlation does not imply causation, crowdsourcing, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, David Brooks, deindustrialization, demographic transition, Donald Trump, Elon Musk, en.wikipedia.org, facts on the ground, failed state, Fall of the Berlin Wall, first-past-the-post, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, Haight Ashbury, Herbert Marcuse, illegal immigration, immigration reform, imperial preference, income inequality, knowledge economy, knowledge worker, liberal capitalism, longitudinal study, Lyft, mass immigration, meta-analysis, microaggression, moral panic, Nate Silver, New Urbanism, Norman Mailer, open borders, phenotype, postnationalism / post nation state, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Republic of Letters, Ronald Reagan, Scientific racism, Silicon Valley, statistical model, Steve Bannon, Steven Pinker, the built environment, the scientific method, The Wisdom of Crowds, transcontinental railway, twin studies, uber lyft, upwardly mobile, urban sprawl, Washington Consensus, white flight, working-age population, World Values Survey, young professional

The party establishment, used to weathering insurgent outsiders before getting its preferred candidate in place, was in shock. In July, at the Republican National Convention, Trump officially became the Republican nominee. Trump named Indiana governor Mike Pence, an evangelical, as his running mate and in August appointed Steve Bannon, head of the right-wing news website Breitbart, to run his campaign. Bannon, a former investment banker and media industry executive, moved in transnational right-wing circles by the 2000s. In 2007, he wrote an eight-page treatment for a documentary entitled Destroying the Great Satan: The Rise of Islamic Facism [sic] in America.

Though the alt-right had only limited reach, a less radical but more influential restrictionist elite emerged online and in the right-wing media. Popular right-wing bloggers like Ann Coulter or Mike Cernovich, with followers numbering in the millions, routinely flag violent incidents involving illegal Hispanic immigrants and Muslims. At the institutional level, Trump adviser Steve Bannon, though forced out of both Trump’s White House and Breitbart News, helped lay the groundwork for the new cultural nationalism. Bannon was influenced by Jean Raspail’s apocalyptic novel about a Third World immigrant invasion of France called The Camp of the Saints (1973) and was well versed in ‘counter-jihadist’ currents of European thought.135 All successful nationalist movements require cultural elites, and while the new online right is less anchored in class and institutions than the patrician Immigration Restriction League of Henry Cabot Lodge’s day it still constitutes a coherent network.

Trump argued that his comments reflected the fact that the far-right demonstration was legal while the counter-demonstration was not. Much of the media and many politicians struck back, claiming the counter-protesters’ cause was ethical while the far-right’s wasn’t, and this was an important difference. Moreover, the fatality was on the counter-demonstrators’ side. Trump’s strategist Steve Bannon was accused of being behind the strategy of drawing a moral equivalence between the rival groups.1 In polling conducted after the event, whites, by a 59–18 margin, blamed the far right for the violence; however those who backed Trump said by a 35–27 margin that the counter-demonstrators were at fault.2 A non-binary question discovered a more even picture: 31 per cent said both sides were responsible, 28 per cent said white supremacists were, and 10 per cent blamed the anti-fascist left.3 In this chapter we’ll observe what happens when left-modernism and a rising ethno-traditional nationalism collide.


pages: 245 words: 72,893

How Democracy Ends by David Runciman

barriers to entry, basic income, Bernie Sanders, bitcoin, blockchain, Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty, centre right, crowdsourcing, cuban missile crisis, disinformation, Dominic Cummings, Donald Trump, Edward Snowden, first-past-the-post, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, full employment, Internet of things, Joseph Schumpeter, Kickstarter, loss aversion, Mahatma Gandhi, Mark Zuckerberg, money: store of value / unit of account / medium of exchange, mutually assured destruction, Network effects, Norman Mailer, Panopticon Jeremy Bentham, Peter Thiel, quantitative easing, self-driving car, Silicon Valley, Steve Bannon, Steven Pinker, The Wisdom of Crowds, Travis Kalanick, universal basic income, Yogi Berra

If people had really believed what Trump said, would they have voted for him? That would have been a very brave act, given the risks of total civil breakdown. Maybe they voted for him because they didn’t really believe him? It took me about fifteen minutes to acclimatise to the idea that this rhetoric was the new normal. Trump’s speechwriters, Steve Bannon and Stephen Miller, had put no words in his mouth that were explicitly anti-democratic. It was a populist speech, but populism does not oppose democracy. Rather, it tries to reclaim it from the elites who have betrayed it. Nothing Trump said disputed the fundamental premise of representative democracy, which is that at the allotted time the people get to say when they have had enough of the politicians who have been making decisions for them.

His Secretary of Defense and Chief of Staff decide they have no alternative but to try to kill him, because all other options – resigning, refusing to obey or public denunciation – would simply make the problem worse, by giving the president an excuse to round on his enemies. In the meantime, the president’s chief strategist, loosely based on Steve Bannon, gets wind of the assassination attempt and decides to use it to frame an Islamist conspiracy, allowing for a further crackdown on anyone perceived as un-American. All of this happens behind closed doors, under the cover of the deafening chatter of the social media age. While members of the public are screaming conspiracy and coup from all sides, the real acts of subversion happen in the places social media cannot reach.


pages: 319 words: 75,257

Trumpocalypse: Restoring American Democracy by David Frum

Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, anti-globalists, Bernie Sanders, centre right, coronavirus, currency manipulation / currency intervention, decarbonisation, disinformation, Donald Trump, Edward Snowden, employer provided health coverage, illegal immigration, immigration reform, labor-force participation, manufacturing employment, mass immigration, microaggression, Mikhail Gorbachev, Nate Silver, obamacare, offshore financial centre, Peter Thiel, Plutocrats, plutocrats, QAnon, rent-seeking, Ronald Reagan, Saturday Night Live, Silicon Valley, Steve Bannon

For decades, Turkish politicians who wished to push their country in more Islamic directions would be balked—or even sometimes overthrown—by Kemal’s heirs in the armed forces. Western political scientists adopted the term deep state to describe the power of the Kemalists after Kemal. Over time, the term was extended to describe other Third World societies with overmighty military and intelligence establishments, especially Pakistan. Steve Bannon absorbed the term somewhere and introduced it to Trump. Trump then diffused it through the conservative media, and especially to his pal Sean Hannity at Fox News. In Turkey and Pakistan, the term deep state described how those with secret power used clandestine means to thwart the regular government.

Americans are ready for reform, but they are left alienated and frightened by the Great Awokening that has seized activist progressives. Donald Trump cannot win reelection in 2020 by his own efforts. But the election can be thrown away by people who will not meet voters where they are. Trump and his supporters appreciate the potentially destructive power of the ultra-progressive Left better than anyone. When Steve Bannon praises Bernie Sanders and when Fox & Friends promotes Tulsi Gabbard, they are not expressing sincere admiration. They are grasping the life vest that can save them from the shipwreck. One credible poll has found that 12 percent of those who supported Sanders against Clinton in 2016 switched to Trump in the general election.23 If the ultra-progressives are thwarted from foisting an unelectable candidate upon the Democratic Party from the inside, perhaps they can be coaxed and manipulated to boost a Trump-rescuing third-party candidacy from the outside.


pages: 369 words: 105,819

The Dangerous Case of Donald Trump: 27 Psychiatrists and Mental Health Experts Assess a President by Bandy X. Lee

Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, cuban missile crisis, David Brooks, declining real wages, delayed gratification, demand response, Donald Trump, Doomsday Clock, facts on the ground, fear of failure, illegal immigration, impulse control, meta-analysis, national security letter, Ronald Reagan, Skype, Steve Bannon, Steve Jobs, The Chicago School

Also in those first ten days, Trump issued various executive orders that demonstrated his mental inability to comprehend the following: what is and is not legal (the immigration ban); what he can and cannot do without getting funding approval from Congress (building a border wall with Mexico); and what is and is not in the best interest of our country’s security (Steve Bannon is in, and certain Cabinet-level officers are out). Trump alienated Mexico; alienated nations across the world with his immigration ban; displayed an inability to vet issues and actions with appropriate parts of the U.S. government before taking action; and displayed a total inability to anticipate (or even consider) the impact of his statements and actions.

Using his proposed federal budget as a lens, Jessica González-Rojas writes, “It outlines President Trump’s spending priorities and program cuts that make clear his utter contempt for communities of color, and it edges this country and its moral compass closer to the nativist vision espoused by the likes of White House advisers Steve Bannon and Stephen Miller, and Attorney General Jeff Sessions” (González-Rojas 2017). His mental health symptoms, including impulsive blame-shifting, claims of unearned superiority, and delusional levels of grandiosity, have been present in his words from his very first campaign speech: “They’re bringing drugs.

The fact that innocent people were being harmed, they said, was an unfortunate but necessary side effect. Conversely, a few Jewish patients I treat who are children of Holocaust survivors fear that another Holocaust is more likely because of Trump’s policies and his association with the likes of Steve Bannon. They are afraid that those in bed with white nationalists send a message to anti-Semitic people that it is safe to act out their racist and prejudiced agendas. I recently spent the Jewish holiday of Passover with my family at a resort where a conservative political writer had been hired to speak.


pages: 419 words: 119,476

Posh Boys: How English Public Schools Ruin Britain by Robert Verkaik

accounting loophole / creative accounting, Alistair Cooke, banking crisis, Berlin Wall, Boris Johnson, British Empire, Brixton riot, disinformation, Dominic Cummings, Donald Trump, Etonian, G4S, gender pay gap, God and Mammon, income inequality, Khartoum Gordon, Kickstarter, knowledge economy, Livingstone, I presume, loadsamoney, mega-rich, Neil Kinnock, offshore financial centre, old-boy network, place-making, Plutocrats, plutocrats, Robert Gordon, Robert Mercer, school vouchers, Steve Bannon, The Bell Curve by Richard Herrnstein and Charles Murray, trade route, traveling salesman, unpaid internship

(It was the smooth-talking Nix who was later caught in a Channel 4 undercover reporting sting where he was recorded offering a range of dirty tricks to discredit a political candidate.) Then, in 2016, CA took its social media campaigning to America. The firm first worked on Ted Cruz’s campaign to become the Republican presidential candidate. Mercer was so impressed with CA he became a major shareholder while Trump’s then chief strategist, Steve Bannon, joined the company board. Perhaps inevitably, given these connections, the Trump campaign ended up paying almost £5 million to the company to help it target swing voters. Buoyed by their initial success in the US presidential primaries, the firm had also turned its attention to the EU referendum.

As chair of Stop the War, Murray also played a crucial role in the largest political demonstration in British history, the 2003 rally against the war in Iraq. He stood down in June 2011 to be succeeded by Corbyn. After Labour’s surprising showing in the 2017 general election, when Corbyn clawed back Theresa May’s parliamentary majority, Murray, who was seconded from the Unite trade union, was described as the ‘hard-left’s Steve Bannon’. Both men are regarded as keepers of the flame of their respective ideologies who are able to rally great numbers to the cause. Murray’s daughter Laura was also an important figure in Momentum, building close links with Schneider and Corbyn’s sons Ben and Sebastian. Following a stint as a Labour political adviser covering the communities brief, she was made Corbyn’s ‘stakeholder manager’ in June 2017, giving her a key role connecting with groups linked to the Labour leadership.15 Lansman’s eldest son Max, a barrister, was also reported to have a key role with Momentum.16 Corbyn’s second son, Sebastian, worked on his father’s leadership campaign before becoming John McDonnell’s chief of staff.

His two other children with Ivana, Donald Trump Junior (Buckley School, New York) and Eric (Trinity School, New York), and his daughter by second wife Marla, Tiffany (Viewpoint School, California), all received equally privileged and expensive educations. The man most credited with influencing Trump the presidential candidate is the product of a very similar education. Steve Bannon, Trump’s trusty campaign director and former Whitehouse chief of staff, spent his formative years at a military academy in Richmond, Virginia called the Benedict College Preparatory. The school mixed monastic life with a strict military prospectus that echoed the Christian morality of the Victorian English public school.


Mbs: The Rise to Power of Mohammed Bin Salman by Ben Hubbard

Ayatollah Khomeini, bitcoin, Donald Trump, Jeff Bezos, knowledge economy, Mark Zuckerberg, medical residency, megacity, Mohammed Bouazizi, RAND corporation, ride hailing / ride sharing, Rosa Parks, Rubik’s Cube, Silicon Valley, Snapchat, Steve Bannon, Steve Jobs, Tim Cook: Apple, urban planning, WikiLeaks, women in the workforce, Yom Kippur War

And while American watchdogs sought to make sure that Trump and his family were not using his presidency to benefit their businesses, that didn’t bother the Saudis. Their whole country bore the name of the royal family, and there had never been a clear line between family and state funds anyway. At one point, Steve Bannon, a Trump adviser who had run the Breitbart News Network, a website that often published anti-Muslim views, was caught chatting with a bearded cleric who happened to be the Minister of Islamic Affairs. A video spread online of a senior prince teaching Ivanka to jiggle her coffee cup so that the servers would stop refilling it, a Saudi tradition.

Wielding a Twitter account with more than a million followers, al-Qahtani emerged as a major force on the platform, celebrating his boss’s every move while marshaling attacks on enemies, from foreign news organizations, to Iran, Qatar, and Saudis who were insufficiently supportive of the prince. Al-Qahtani’s attacks spurred offensives by hundreds of sympathetic accounts that critics referred to as “electronic flies” because of how they swarmed their targets. His detractors called him “Saudi Arabia’s Steve Bannon” and the “Lord of the Flies.” After the Qatar boycott, al-Qahtani turned up the heat, spearheading a frenzied online McCarthyism. He announced an official hashtag, #The_Black_List, and called on his followers to suggest names for it. “Saudi Arabia and its brothers do what they say. This is a promise,” he wrote.

Dated July 1, 2015. https://wikileaks.org/​hackingteam/​emails/​emailid/​1118843 guy seemed paranoid: Ibid. “bad cop and lesser bad cop”: Author interview, Dennis Horak, Nov. 2018. “pro-active thought authoritarianism”: Author interview, Alexi Abrahams, Oct. 2018. “Lord of the Flies”: “Who is Saudi al-Qahtani, Saudi Arabia’s Steve Bannon,” The New Arab, Aug. 23, 2017. suggest names for it: Saud al-Qahtani (@saud1978), “al-hashtaaq ar-rasmi # al-qaaima as-sawda” (Ar.), Twitter post, Aug. 17. 2017. https://twitter.com/​saudq1978/​status/​898265869368807424 “starting now”: Saudi al-Qahtani (@saud1978), “as-sa‘udia wa ashiqaauha” (Ar.), Twitter post, Aug. 17, 2017. https://twitter.com/​saudq1978/​status/​898259368696725504 would be punished or prosecuted: Saudi al-Qahtani (@saud1978), “wa‘ad: santajalla al-ghimma ‘an al-khaleej” (Ar.), Twitter post, Aug. 17, 2017. https://twitter.com/​saudq1978/​status/​898257245183463424 state could unmask them: Saudi al-Qahtani (@saud1978), “hal al-ism al-musa‘aar yaHmeek” (Ar.), Twitter post, Aug. 18, 2017. https://twitter.com/​saudq1978/​status/​898379274788491265 “the faithful crown prince”: Saudi al-Qahtani (@saud1978), “wa ta‘taqid ani aqdaH min rasi” (Ar.), Twitter post, Aug. 17, 2017. https://twitter.com/​saudq1978/​status/​898273541367451648 to guide their coverage: Author interviews, Saudi journalists, 2017–18, and American officials, May 2019.


pages: 300 words: 87,374

The Light That Failed: A Reckoning by Ivan Krastev, Stephen Holmes

active measures, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Andrei Shleifer, anti-communist, anti-globalists, bank run, Berlin Wall, borderless world, corporate governance, David Brooks, deglobalization, deindustrialization, Deng Xiaoping, disinformation, Dissolution of the Soviet Union, Donald Trump, failed state, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, illegal immigration, Kickstarter, knowledge economy, kremlinology, liberal world order, mass immigration, Mikhail Gorbachev, nuclear winter, obamacare, offshore financial centre, open borders, postnationalism / post nation state, reserve currency, Ronald Reagan, shared worldview, South China Sea, Steve Bannon, the market place, Thorstein Veblen, too big to fail, WikiLeaks

It is one thing for Kaczyński to say that migrants are bringing diseases into his country, however. It is another thing for Trump to say the same. It is one thing for Kaczyński to say to Orbán that ‘You have given an example and we are learning from your example.’48 It is much more significant and ominous for Steve Bannon to describe Orbán as a ‘hero’, an inspiration and ‘the most significant guy on the scene right now’.49 A non-negligible degree of sympathy with Orbán’s anti-EU politics can be found in almost every country of Western Europe. This is why critics of Brussels subsidies to Hungary and Poland blame the EU, to paraphrase Lenin, for giving Orbán and Kaczyński the rope with which to hang the West.50 The fact that politicians in the West are now adopting the xenophobic nationalism of the East contains a final vengeful twist.

Otherwise, as it transpired at the time with North Africa under the extinction of the ancient Christian culture, Italy would have been incorporated into the Islamic world.’ Carl Schmitt, Land and Sea: A World-Historical Meditation (Telos Press, 2015), pp. 17–18. 47. Valerie Hopkins, ‘Hungary’s Viktor Orbán blasts “ United States of Europe” ’, Financial Times (16 March 2019). 48. Foy and Buckley, ‘Orban and Kaczynski’. 49. Jason Horowitz, ‘Steve Bannon Is Done Wrecking the American Establishment. Now He Wants to Destroy Europe’s’, The New York Times (9 March 2018). 50. Griff Witte and Michael Birnbaum, ‘In Eastern Europe, the E.U. faces a rebellion more threatening than Brexit’, Washington Post (5 April 2018). 51. Vaclav Havel, ‘Ce que j’ai cru, ce que je crois’, Le Nouvel Observateur (19 December 19, 2011). 52.


pages: 210 words: 65,833

This Is Not Normal: The Collapse of Liberal Britain by William Davies

Airbnb, basic income, Bernie Sanders, Big bang: deregulation of the City of London, Boris Johnson, central bank independence, centre right, Chelsea Manning, coronavirus, corporate governance, Covid-19, COVID-19, credit crunch, deindustrialization, disinformation, Dominic Cummings, Donald Trump, double entry bookkeeping, Edward Snowden, family office, Filter Bubble, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, ghettoisation, gig economy, global pandemic, global village, illegal immigration, Internet of things, late capitalism, liberal capitalism, loadsamoney, London Interbank Offered Rate, mass immigration, moral hazard, Neil Kinnock, Northern Rock, old-boy network, postnationalism / post nation state, precariat, prediction markets, quantitative easing, recommendation engine, Robert Mercer, Ronald Reagan, sentiment analysis, sharing economy, Silicon Valley, Slavoj Žižek, statistical model, Steve Bannon, Steven Pinker, surveillance capitalism, technoutopianism, The Chicago School, Thorstein Veblen, transaction costs, universal basic income, web of trust, WikiLeaks, Yochai Benkler

There seems little doubt that for many of Thatcher’s followers the free market experiment hasn’t gone far enough. As long as there is an NHS, a welfare state and a public sector that is more European than American in scale, we will never truly discover what the British people are made of, because they will never be forced to find out. Steve Bannon, the former Trump strategist, has often voiced the opinion that America’s only hope of moral cleansing lies in war. Tory Brexiteers tend not to go that far, but they may well be holding out for a milder version of the same idea, an extreme of economic hardship that means government is no longer capable of picking up the pieces.

A common thread linking ‘hard’ Brexiteers to nationalists across the globe is that they resent the very idea of governing as a complex, modern, fact-based set of activities that requires technical expertise and permanent officials. Soon after entering the White House as President Trump’s chief strategist, Steve Bannon expressed the hope that the newly appointed cabinet would achieve the ‘deconstruction of the administrative state’. In Europe, the European Commission – which has copious governmental capacity, but scant sovereignty – is an obvious target for nationalists such as Prime Minister Viktor Orbán of Hungary.


pages: 323 words: 95,492

The Rise of the Outsiders: How Mainstream Politics Lost Its Way by Steve Richards

Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Airbnb, banking crisis, battle of ideas, Bernie Sanders, Boris Johnson, call centre, centre right, collapse of Lehman Brothers, David Brooks, Dominic Cummings, Donald Trump, Etonian, eurozone crisis, falling living standards, full employment, housing crisis, low skilled workers, manufacturing employment, Martin Wolf, mass immigration, Neil Kinnock, obamacare, Occupy movement, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, Steve Bannon

If Trump’s presidency has a house publication, it will not be The New York Times, which Trump attacks regularly on Twitter and in press conferences. It will be Breitbart, a right-wing opinion and news website formed in 2007, which one former editor has described as ‘Trump Pravda’. Trump appointed the website’s executive chairman, Steve Bannon, a former Goldman Sachs banker, as his White House strategy chief. The fast-growing Breitbart opinion and news website has become a rallying point for Trump’s nationalist, sometimes racist and often angry, ‘alt-right’ support base. It campaigned hard for Trump throughout the primaries, waging war against the candidacy of the Florida senator Marco Rubio, before becoming Trump’s supportive voice during the presidential election.

. ______ POLITICAL PARTIES AND POLITICIANS / ADVISERS Tony Abbott: former Australian PM AfD Party: right-wing Alternative for Germany party Esperanza Aguirre: Spanish politician Jonathan Aitken: former Conservative MP Austrian People’s Party David Axelrod: adviser to Barack Obama Ed Balls: former Labour shadow chancellor Steve Bannon: Trump’s White House strategy chief Tony Benn: left-wing Labour MP Silvio Berlusconi: former Italian PM and leader of the Forza Italia party John Boehner: former Speaker of the US House of Representatives Willy Brandt: former German chancellor Gordon Brown: former PM George W. Bush: former US president Jeb Bush: Republican presidential candidate Jim Callaghan: former PM David Cameron: former PM Alastair Campbell: Tony Blair’s press secretary Gianroberto Casaleggio: co-founder of the Italian M5S party Mário Centeno: Portugal’s finance minister Jacques Chirac: former French president Christian Democratic Union of Germany (CDU) Ken Clarke: former UK chancellor Nick Clegg: former deputy PM and Lib-Dem leader Bill Clinton: former US president Hillary Clinton: US presidential candidate Robin Cook: former Foreign Secretary Jeremy Corbyn: Labour leader António Costa: Portugal’s socialist leader and PM Jon Cruddas: Labour MP Ted Cruz: Republican presidential candidate Dominic Cummings: one of the architects of the victory in the Brexit referendum Danish People’s Party Alistair Darling: former UK chancellor David Davis: Brexit secretary Democratic Party (PD): Italy Democratic Party: US Bob Dole: US presidential candidate Bernard Donoughue: adviser to Jim Callaghan Iain Duncan Smith: former Conservative leader Recep Erdogan: president of Turkey Íñigo Errejón: Podemos’ political secretary Nigel Farage: former leader of UKIP Werner Faymann: former Austrian chancellor François Fillon: former French PM Five Star Movement (M5S): Italy Forza Italia party: Italy Norman Fowler: former Conservative minister Free Democratic Party: Germany Freedom Party (FPÖ): Austria Front National: France Colonel Gaddafi: former Libyan dictator Alexander Gauland: AfD politician Julia Gillard: former Australian PM Philip Gould: Labour adviser and guru Michael Gove: former Justice Secretary and leading ‘Out’ campaigner Green Party: Austria Beppe Grillo: founder of the Five Star Movement, Italy William Hague: former Conservative leader Joe Haines: press secretary for Harold Wilson Philip Hammond: UK chancellor Pauline Hanson: leader of the One Nation party in Australia Ted Heath: former PM Norbert Hofer: far-right-wing presidential candidate in Austria, Freedom Party François Hollande: French president Michael Howard: former Conservative leader and Home Secretary Tristram Hunt: former Labour MP Pablo Iglesias Turrión: leader of Podemos in Spain Diane James: briefly UKIP leader Roy Jenkins: former leader of the SDP Jobbik party: Hungary Boris Johnson: Foreign Secretary Lyndon B.


pages: 276 words: 71,950

Antisemitism: Here and Now by Deborah E. Lipstadt

anti-communist, Ayatollah Khomeini, Boycotts of Israel, Cass Sunstein, Donald Trump, en.wikipedia.org, epigenetics, fixed income, ghettoisation, microaggression, Stephen Hawking, Steve Bannon, Steven Pinker, The Bell Curve by Richard Herrnstein and Charles Murray, union organizing, WikiLeaks, zero-sum game

You can’t fight racism but excuse antisemitism, just as you cannot fight antisemitism while excusing and justifying racism or Islamophobia.”2 Subsequently, additional information about meetings of some leaders of the Democratic Party with Farrakhan have come to light. Here, too, the outrage has been strikingly muted.3 Progressives are not, of course, the only ones who have a less-than-stellar record of addressing racism in their midst. In the fall of 2017, details emerged regarding the far-right leanings of Steve Bannon and Breitbart News. There is no credible evidence that Bannon is himself an antisemite, but it is extremely distressing that right-wing Jewish groups that trumpet his support for Israel ignored the racism, anti-immigrant, and white nationalist views promulgated by Breitbart News when he ran it.4 He helped galvanize the emerging white nationalist movement.

Shachar Peled, “Bannon Addresses ZOA, Urges Jews to Join ‘Insurgency’ against Anti-Trump Republicans,” Haaretz, November 13, 2017. 5. Weisman, (((Semitism))), p. 144. 6. Joseph Bernstein, “Alt-White: How the Breitbart Machine Laundered Racist Hate,” BuzzFeed, October 15, 2017; Melanie Phillips, “The Alt-Right Smear,” MelaniePhillips.com, March 17, 2017; Lloyd Green, “The Zionist Leader Who Can’t Quit Steve Bannon,” Daily Beast, August 30, 2017; Armin Rosen, “ZOA President Meets with Top Trump Aide,” Tablet, January 26, 2017; “White Nationalist Richard Spencer Gives Israel as Example of Ethno-State He Wants in U.S.,” Haaretz, October 19, 2017; Weisman, (((Semitism))), p. 90. 7. Jack Moore, “Israel’s Netanyahu Hasn’t Condemned Hungary’s ‘Anti-Semitic’ George Soros Posters.


pages: 241 words: 75,417

The Last President of Europe: Emmanuel Macron's Race to Revive France and Save the World by William Drozdiak

Berlin Wall, bilateral investment treaty, Boeing 737 MAX, Boris Johnson, centre right, cloud computing, disinformation, Donald Trump, failed state, Fall of the Berlin Wall, hiring and firing, illegal immigration, immigration reform, income inequality, New Urbanism, offshore financial centre, reserve currency, Silicon Valley, Socratic dialogue, South China Sea, Steve Bannon, UNCLOS, working poor

“There is a conspiracy of all the radical right-wing nationalists everywhere, apparently with the help of the Kremlin, or of oligarchs around the Kremlin, to disrupt this European Union,” said Guy Verhofstadt, a former Belgian prime minister and leading member of the European Parliament, on the eve of the European elections.22 The axis of illiberalism that threatens to destabilize Europe’s political order goes beyond Russia’s links with Europe’s populist nationalists and includes conservative political allies in the United States, including President Trump and the alt-right movement led by Steve Bannon, the president’s former adviser. Bannon has raised funds among ultra-conservative supporters in Europe and the United States to establish an “Academy for the Judeo-Christian West”—a far-right “gladiator school” housed in a thirteenth-century monastery not far from Rome for the purpose of grooming future right-wing political leaders across Europe.

As Europe suffers the consequences of its inaction, Macron hopes that his EU partners will start to recognize the need for Europe to shape a common approach to the outside world. He has openly challenged the intrusion of outside forces that he claims are seeking to disrupt Europe’s internal politics, citing the activities of Trump’s former adviser Steve Bannon as an example. “For the first time, I see connivance between nationalists and foreign interests whose aim is to dismantle Europe,” Macron said. Bannon is not alone in trying to manipulate Europe’s constellation of forces. The governments of Russia, China, and the United States are all trying to shape Europe’s political course.


pages: 1,034 words: 241,773

Enlightenment Now: The Case for Reason, Science, Humanism, and Progress by Steven Pinker

3D printing, access to a mobile phone, affirmative action, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, agricultural Revolution, Albert Einstein, Alfred Russel Wallace, anti-communist, Anton Chekhov, Arthur Eddington, artificial general intelligence, availability heuristic, Ayatollah Khomeini, basic income, Berlin Wall, Bernie Sanders, Black Swan, Bonfire of the Vanities, business cycle, capital controls, Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty, carbon footprint, clean water, clockwork universe, cognitive bias, cognitive dissonance, Columbine, conceptual framework, correlation does not imply causation, creative destruction, crowdsourcing, cuban missile crisis, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, dark matter, decarbonisation, deindustrialization, dematerialisation, demographic transition, Deng Xiaoping, distributed generation, diversified portfolio, Donald Trump, Doomsday Clock, double helix, effective altruism, Elon Musk, en.wikipedia.org, end world poverty, endogenous growth, energy transition, European colonialism, experimental subject, Exxon Valdez, facts on the ground, Fall of the Berlin Wall, first-past-the-post, Flynn Effect, food miles, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, frictionless, frictionless market, Garrett Hardin, germ theory of disease, Gini coefficient, Hacker Conference 1984, Hans Rosling, hedonic treadmill, helicopter parent, Herbert Marcuse, Hobbesian trap, humanitarian revolution, Ignaz Semmelweis: hand washing, income inequality, income per capita, Indoor air pollution, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), invention of writing, Jaron Lanier, Joan Didion, job automation, Johannes Kepler, John Snow's cholera map, Kevin Kelly, Khan Academy, knowledge economy, l'esprit de l'escalier, Laplace demon, life extension, long peace, longitudinal study, Louis Pasteur, Mahbub ul Haq, Martin Wolf, mass incarceration, meta-analysis, microaggression, Mikhail Gorbachev, minimum wage unemployment, moral hazard, mutually assured destruction, Naomi Klein, Nate Silver, Nathan Meyer Rothschild: antibiotics, Nelson Mandela, New Journalism, Norman Mailer, nuclear winter, obamacare, open economy, Paul Graham, peak oil, Peter Singer: altruism, Peter Thiel, precision agriculture, prediction markets, purchasing power parity, Ralph Nader, randomized controlled trial, Ray Kurzweil, rent control, Republic of Letters, Richard Feynman, road to serfdom, Robert Gordon, Rodney Brooks, rolodex, Ronald Reagan, Rory Sutherland, Saturday Night Live, science of happiness, Scientific racism, Second Machine Age, secular stagnation, self-driving car, sharing economy, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley ideology, Simon Kuznets, Skype, smart grid, sovereign wealth fund, stem cell, Stephen Hawking, Steve Bannon, Steven Pinker, Stewart Brand, Stuxnet, supervolcano, technological singularity, Ted Kaczynski, The Rise and Fall of American Growth, the scientific method, The Signal and the Noise by Nate Silver, The Spirit Level, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, The Wisdom of Crowds, Thomas Kuhn: the structure of scientific revolutions, Thomas Malthus, total factor productivity, Tragedy of the Commons, union organizing, universal basic income, University of East Anglia, Unsafe at Any Speed, Upton Sinclair, uranium enrichment, urban renewal, War on Poverty, We wanted flying cars, instead we got 140 characters, women in the workforce, working poor, World Values Survey, Y2K

“Mothers and children” from Donald Trump’s inaugural speech, Jan. 20, 2017, https://www.whitehouse.gov/inaugural-address. “Outright war” and “spiritual and moral foundations” from Trump chief strategist Stephen Bannon’s remarks to a Vatican conference in the summer of 2014, transcribed in J. L. Feder, “This Is How Steve Bannon Sees the Entire World,” BuzzFeed, Nov. 16, 2016, https://www.buzzfeed.com/lesterfeder/this-is-how-steve-bannon-sees-the-entire-world. “Global power structure” from “Donald Trump’s Argument for America,” final television campaign ad, Nov. 2016, http://blog.4president.org/2016/2016-tv-ad/. Bannon is commonly credited with authoring or coauthoring all three. 2.

Examples are the European wars of religion (Pinker 2011, pp. 234, 676–77) and even the American Civil War (Montgomery & Chirot 2015, p. 350). 47. White 2011, pp. 107–11. 48. S. Bannon, remarks to a conference at the Vatican, 2014, transcribed in J. L. Feder, “This Is How Steve Bannon Sees the Entire World,” BuzzFeed, Nov. 16, 2016, https://www.buzzfeed.com/lesterfeder/this-is-how-steve-bannon-sees-the-entire-world. 49. Nazis sympathetic to Christianity and vice versa: Ericksen & Heschel 1999; Hellier 2011; Heschel 2008; Steigmann-Gall 2003; White 2011. Hitler was not an atheist: Hellier 2011; Murphy 1999; Richards 2013; see also “Hitler Was a Christian,” http://www.evilbible.com/evil-bible-home-page/hitler-was-a-christian/. 50.

Baskin, “The Academic Home of Trumpism,” Chronicle of Higher Education, March 17, 2017; Lampert 1996. 119. Nationalism and counter-Enlightenment Romanticism: Berlin 1979; Garrard 2006; Herman 1997; Howard 2001; McMahon 2001; Sternhell 2010; Wolin 2004. 120. Rediscovery of early Fascists: J. Horowitz, “Steve Bannon Cited Italian Thinker Who Inspired Fascists,” New York Times, Feb. 10, 2017; P. Levy, “Stephen Bannon Is a Fan of a French Philosopher . . . Who Was an Anti-Semite and a Nazi Supporter,” Mother Jones, March 16, 2017; M. Crowley, “The Man Who Wants to Unmake the West,” Politico, March/April 2017.


pages: 349 words: 98,868

Nervous States: Democracy and the Decline of Reason by William Davies

active measures, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Amazon Web Services, bank run, banking crisis, basic income, business cycle, Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty, citizen journalism, Climategate, Climatic Research Unit, Colonization of Mars, continuation of politics by other means, creative destruction, credit crunch, decarbonisation, deindustrialization, discovery of penicillin, Dominic Cummings, Donald Trump, drone strike, Elon Musk, failed state, Filter Bubble, first-past-the-post, Frank Gehry, gig economy, housing crisis, income inequality, Isaac Newton, Jeff Bezos, Johannes Kepler, Joseph Schumpeter, knowledge economy, loss aversion, low skilled workers, Mahatma Gandhi, Mark Zuckerberg, mass immigration, meta-analysis, Mont Pelerin Society, mutually assured destruction, Northern Rock, obamacare, Occupy movement, pattern recognition, Peace of Westphalia, Peter Thiel, Philip Mirowski, planetary scale, post-industrial society, quantitative easing, RAND corporation, Ray Kurzweil, Richard Florida, road to serfdom, Robert Mercer, Ronald Reagan, sentiment analysis, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, smart cities, statistical model, Steve Bannon, Steve Jobs, the scientific method, Turing machine, Uber for X, universal basic income, University of East Anglia, Valery Gerasimov, We are the 99%, WikiLeaks, women in the workforce, zero-sum game

Le Bon himself saw war as a positive antidote to socialism and excessive democracy. Nationalists have long bemoaned the influence of pacifists, “liberal elites” and (more recently) “political correctness” for neutering the unity and fighting spirit of the people. Media executive, outspoken nationalist, and former Trump adviser Steve Bannon holds a dim view of the moral fiber of American society, which he believes has been weakened by globalization and can only be repaired with war. “Is that grit still there,” he asks, “that tenacity, that we’ve seen on the battlefield?”15 The only way to rediscover it, in Bannon’s view, is to take to the battlefield once again.

The cultural and political divisions separating centers of expertise from other sections of their societies have created a situation with rhetorical echoes of the colonial one, in which the methods of science and expertise seem like an arm of some foreign Leviathan state. Modern bureaucratic government becomes represented as the enemy, with Steve Bannon (while still working in the White House) declaring that Trump’s cabinet would seek the “deconstruction of the administrative state,” and leading Brexiteer Jacob Rees-Mogg accusing the British Treasury of “fiddling figures” to pursue its own political goals. The nativist idea that the nation needs reclaiming from the elites has echoes of the rhetoric of anti-colonial nationalism.


pages: 289 words: 86,165

Ten Lessons for a Post-Pandemic World by Fareed Zakaria

Asian financial crisis, basic income, Bernie Sanders, Boris Johnson, butterfly effect, Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty, car-free, central bank independence, clean water, cloud computing, colonial rule, coronavirus, Covid-19, COVID-19, Credit Default Swap, David Graeber, deglobalization, Deng Xiaoping, Dominic Cummings, Donald Trump, Edward Glaeser, Elon Musk, Erik Brynjolfsson, failed state, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, future of work, gig economy, Gini coefficient, global pandemic, global reserve currency, global supply chain, hiring and firing, housing crisis, imperial preference, income inequality, Indoor air pollution, invention of the wheel, Jane Jacobs, Jeff Bezos, John Maynard Keynes: Economic Possibilities for our Grandchildren, John Snow's cholera map, Long Term Capital Management, manufacturing employment, Marc Andreessen, Mark Zuckerberg, Martin Wolf, means of production, megacity, Mexican peso crisis / tequila crisis, Monroe Doctrine, Nate Silver, oil shock, open borders, out of africa, Parag Khanna, Peter Thiel, Plutocrats, plutocrats, popular capitalism, Productivity paradox, purchasing power parity, remote working, reserve currency, reshoring, ride hailing / ride sharing, Ronald Reagan, secular stagnation, Silicon Valley, software is eating the world, South China Sea, Steve Bannon, Steve Jobs, Steven Pinker, the built environment, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, The inhabitant of London could order by telephone, sipping his morning tea in bed, the various products of the whole earth, The Spirit Level, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thomas L Friedman, Tim Cook: Apple, trade route, UNCLOS, universal basic income, urban planning, Washington Consensus, white flight, Works Progress Administration

Politicians on the right often used the phrase “starving the beast” to describe their strategy toward the government. The anti-tax crusader Grover Norquist put it in even more pungent terms: “I don’t want to abolish government. I simply want to reduce it to the size where I can drag it into the bathroom and drown it in the bathtub.” Steve Bannon, the ideologist of the Trump revolution, made clear that one of his central goals was the “deconstruction of the administrative state.” For four decades, America has largely been run by people who openly pledge to destroy the very government they lead. Is it any wonder that they have succeeded?

In 1991, India, which had long practiced socialism and protectionism, faced an economic crisis that forced it to liberalize. The next year, with Deng Xiaoping’s “Southern Tour,” China revived its stalled capitalist reforms. The financial crisis of 2008 began the process of reevaluation—on both right and left. Steve Bannon argues that the seeds of Trump’s takeover of the Republican Party were sowed by that crash. In the years since, the Right has veered away from its devotion to markets, instead espousing protectionism, subsidies, immigration controls, and cultural nationalism—ideas championed by Trump in the United States, Boris Johnson in the United Kingdom, and other populists around the world.


pages: 530 words: 147,851

Small Men on the Wrong Side of History: The Decline, Fall and Unlikely Return of Conservatism by Ed West

Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, anti-communist, assortative mating, battle of ideas, Beeching cuts, Berlin Wall, Boris Johnson, British Empire, Broken windows theory, centre right, clean water, cognitive dissonance, Corn Laws, David Attenborough, David Brooks, deindustrialization, delayed gratification, desegregation, different worldview, Donald Trump, Elon Musk, en.wikipedia.org, Etonian, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Ferguson, Missouri, future of work, gender pay gap, George Santayana, Herbert Marcuse, illegal immigration, labor-force participation, laissez-faire capitalism, lump of labour, mass immigration, means of production, megacity, meta-analysis, moral hazard, moral panic, Neil Kinnock, Nelson Mandela, Norman Mailer, obamacare, pattern recognition, Ralph Nader, replication crisis, rising living standards, Ronald Reagan, Scientific racism, Steve Bannon, Steven Pinker, Thomas Malthus, Tragedy of the Commons, Turing test, twin studies, urban decay, War on Poverty, Winter of Discontent, zero-sum game

James had recommended me to run the Breitbart UK site after the regular guy Raheem Kassam had been seconded to work for Nigel Farage for the upcoming general election in 2015. He told me I’d be called at home one Sunday morning by the company’s chief executive, some American I’d never heard of called Steve Bannon. I looked Bannon up and learned that he was a former US Navy Lieutenant and banker for Goldman Sachs, as well as an executive producer in Hollywood. The more I read the more terrifying he sounded, the epitome of American aggression and kick-ass determination, and I was nervous about the call, even though they were courting me.

In recent years there has been a steep rise in the proportion of female students, especially in the humanities, so it would seem logical, therefore, that already heavily Left-leaning institutions filled with single women would be the perfect breeding ground for a progressive movement, one in which members are in competition to display their political zeal.19 In contrast, increasing numbers of men are moving into all-male worlds by dropping out of dating altogether, and the online Alt-Right grew out of a heavily male subculture, where angry single men made ideal recruits to a cause. This was something noticed long ago by Steve Bannon during his venture into World of Warcraft, when the future Breitbart boss said that ‘These guys, these rootless, white males, had monster power.’20 Men are less sociable on average than women, which explains why they are more willing to join political movements seen as beyond the pale. Across twenty-eight different countries, ‘men’s generally lower sensitivity to social cues makes them more likely to vote for stigmatized and small parties’ than women.21 Radical Right-wing groups do far better among men, the Sweden Democrats scoring 10 per cent more support among males, for instance.

lang=en. 15 https://anepigone.blogspot.com/2017/08/gen-z-is-wests-last-great-hope.html. 16 https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/jun/24/democrats-losing-millennial-vote-change-message. 17 https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/jun/24/democrats-losing-millennial-vote-change-message. 18 https://twitter.com/wesyang/status/1012418245826109440. As Tablet columnist Wesley Yang suggested, ‘viral hate-read clickbait’ may have played a part. 19 http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-40504076. 20 http://nymag.com/selectall/2017/07/steve-bannon-world-of-warcraft-gold-farming.html. 21 https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/british-journal-of-political-science/article/gender-differences-in-vote-choice-social-cues-and-social-harmony-asheuristics/DB58CD40104BABA70AF2917DD5C89AF4. 22 https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2018/08/why-the-left-is-so-afraid-of-jordan-peterson/567110/. 23 https://www.wsj.com/articles/jordan-peterson-and-conservatisms-rebirth-1529101961. 24 http://quillette.com/2017/11/12/non-believers-turning-bibles/. 25 https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/7a6b/ad93d88b0158d449881e56749d5443b3ff80.pdf. 26 https://www.theguardian.com/science/2018/nov/11/nature-or-nurture-debate-three-identical-strangers-film?


pages: 706 words: 202,591

Facebook: The Inside Story by Steven Levy

active measures, Airbnb, Airbus A320, Amazon Mechanical Turk, Apple's 1984 Super Bowl advert, augmented reality, Ben Horowitz, blockchain, Burning Man, business intelligence, cloud computing, computer vision, crowdsourcing, cryptocurrency, disinformation, don't be evil, Donald Trump, East Village, Edward Snowden, El Camino Real, Elon Musk, Firefox, Frank Gehry, glass ceiling, indoor plumbing, Jeff Bezos, John Markoff, Jony Ive, Kevin Kelly, Kickstarter, Lyft, Mahatma Gandhi, Marc Andreessen, Mark Zuckerberg, Menlo Park, Metcalfe’s law, MITM: man-in-the-middle, move fast and break things, move fast and break things, natural language processing, Network effects, Oculus Rift, PageRank, Paul Buchheit, paypal mafia, Peter Thiel, pets.com, post-work, Ray Kurzweil, recommendation engine, Robert Mercer, Robert Metcalfe, rolodex, Sam Altman, Sand Hill Road, self-driving car, sexual politics, Shoshana Zuboff, side project, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, slashdot, Snapchat, social graph, social software, South of Market, San Francisco, Startup school, Steve Ballmer, Steve Bannon, Steve Jobs, Steven Levy, Steven Pinker, surveillance capitalism, Tim Cook: Apple, Tragedy of the Commons, web application, WeWork, WikiLeaks, women in the workforce, Y Combinator, Y2K, you are the product

Come and test all your crazy ideas.” Wylie, at twenty-four, was suddenly research director for the SCL Group. Later, he learned that his predecessor had died in a hotel room in Kenya under suspicious circumstances. It was a hint that SCL might have a shady side. Not long after, Wylie met hard-core conservative warrior Steve Bannon, then editing the notoriously partisan right-wing news site Breitbart. Somehow the gay nerd and the proto–white nationalist bonded. “It felt like we were flirting,” Wylie would later write about their data-wonky intellectual jam sessions. Soon they were hatching a plan for SCL to enter America.

Throughout the process, the matter never seemed to reach Sheryl Sandberg or Mark Zuckerberg. * * * • • • AS THE ELECTION season heated up in 2016, Cambridge Analytica was actively working for GOP candidates. After Ted Cruz dropped out, the company began working for the Trump campaign. Cambridge Analytica’s vice president, Steve Bannon, became a top adviser to the candidate himself. Cambridge had contracted with a Canadian company called AggregateIQ—reportedly a Wylie connection—to implement a set of software services to exploit Cambridge’s voter database, including the apparently undeleted profiles and personality summaries provided by Kogan.

promotional copy: This brochure was among a cache of documents that Wylie submitted to UK Parliament. Wylie also explains his background and involvement with Cambridge Analytica in his book, Mindf*ck: Cambridge Analytica and the Plot to Break America (Random House, 2019). “We’ll give you total freedom”: Carole Cadwalladr, “‘I Made Steve Bannon’s Psychological Warfare Tool’: Meet the Data War Whistleblower,” Guardian, March 18, 2018. his predecessor had died: Wylie testimony to House of Commons, Digital, Culture Media and Sport Committee, March 27, 2018. The name came from Bannon: Wylie testimony. Obama campaign: Elizabeth Dwoskin and Tony Romm, “Facebook’s Rules for Accessing User Data Lured More Than Just Cambridge Analytica,” Washington Post, March 19, 2018.


pages: 86 words: 26,489

This America: The Case for the Nation by Jill Lepore

Charles Lindbergh, colonial rule, desegregation, Donald Trump, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, immigration reform, liberal world order, mass immigration, Steve Bannon

From Killing Lincoln he moved on to writing “killing” books about people who hadn’t actually ever been killed. “O’Reilly’s vast carelessness pollutes history and debases the historian’s craft,” the conservative columnist George F. Will wrote in the Washington Post in 2015. But by then O’Reilly’s history books had already sold 6.8 million copies. Donald Trump’s onetime chief strategist Steve Bannon admired a dystopian 1997 book called The Fourth Turning: An American Prophecy, by William Strauss and Neil Howe. “This is a book that turns history into prophecy,” its authors boasted. That prophecy? The fourth turning “could mark the end of man,” or “the end of modernity,” or it “could spare modernity but mark the end of our nation,” or it “could find America, and the world, a much better place.”


pages: 721 words: 238,678

Fall Out: A Year of Political Mayhem by Tim Shipman

banking crisis, Beeching cuts, Bernie Sanders, Boris Johnson, centre right, Clapham omnibus, Corn Laws, corporate governance, Dominic Cummings, Donald Trump, drone strike, Etonian, eurozone crisis, Gordon Gekko, greed is good, iterative process, John Bercow, Kickstarter, kremlinology, land value tax, mutually assured destruction, Neil Kinnock, new economy, non-tariff barriers, offshore financial centre, open borders, quantitative easing, Ronald Reagan, Snapchat, Steve Bannon, working poor

You have to tell stories.”’ It was an analysis they would have done well to remember when May called her own election. Trump’s victory sent shockwaves through Whitehall and prompted hasty assessments of the damage he might do. Concern focused on his declaration that NATO was ‘obsolete’. Trump’s aide Steve Bannon, the alt-right theorist who ran Breitbart News before revitalising Trump’s campaign, was a vociferous opponent of the EU and had professed the hope that it would break up. EU foreign ministers called an immediate ‘panic meeting’ as if a war had broken out rather than democratic elections in a close ally.

In early October the foreign secretary had told a friend, ‘This is an election that is going to expose America’s primal psyche as never before. If it is Trump, it will be a victory of really base daytime TV Redneck America.’ Now the foreign secretary and his advisers had emerged as key contacts for Mike Pence and the ideological end of team Trump – Stephen Miller and chief strategist Steve Bannon – while Hill and Timothy dealt with Reince Priebus, the chief of staff, and Katie Perrior talked to Sean Spicer, her opposite number in the White House. Johnson’s advisers were keen to go to the US to meet the people they had been speaking to on the phone, but it was decreed they could not travel before Hill and Timothy.

The main issue for the British was to ascertain how Trump would approach global affairs and whether he was planning to tear up the international order to affect a new partnership with Vladimir Putin’s Russia. There were jaw-on-the-floor moments. When one of the Brits asked, ‘What do you give Russia to get them to the table?’ the reply astonished Johnson. ‘Steve Bannon being mischievous said if they want to move into some Baltic state, “We’re relaxed,”’ a source present said. To suggest that Russia be given carte blanche to march into a NATO state that both countries were sworn to defend on the pretext of protecting the Russian population was astonishing. Johnson leapt in, ‘What?


pages: 533

Future Politics: Living Together in a World Transformed by Tech by Jamie Susskind

3D printing, additive manufacturing, affirmative action, agricultural Revolution, Airbnb, airport security, algorithmic bias, Andrew Keen, artificial general intelligence, augmented reality, automated trading system, autonomous vehicles, basic income, Bertrand Russell: In Praise of Idleness, bitcoin, blockchain, brain emulation, British Empire, business process, Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty, cashless society, Cass Sunstein, cellular automata, cloud computing, computer age, computer vision, continuation of politics by other means, correlation does not imply causation, crowdsourcing, cryptocurrency, digital map, disinformation, distributed ledger, Donald Trump, easy for humans, difficult for computers, Edward Snowden, Elon Musk, en.wikipedia.org, Erik Brynjolfsson, Ethereum, ethereum blockchain, Filter Bubble, future of work, Google bus, Google X / Alphabet X, Googley, industrial robot, informal economy, intangible asset, Internet of things, invention of the printing press, invention of writing, Isaac Newton, Jaron Lanier, John Markoff, Joseph Schumpeter, Kevin Kelly, knowledge economy, lifelogging, Metcalfe’s law, mittelstand, more computing power than Apollo, move fast and break things, move fast and break things, natural language processing, Network effects, new economy, night-watchman state, Oculus Rift, Panopticon Jeremy Bentham, pattern recognition, payday loans, price discrimination, price mechanism, RAND corporation, ransomware, Ray Kurzweil, Richard Stallman, ride hailing / ride sharing, road to serfdom, Robert Mercer, Satoshi Nakamoto, Second Machine Age, selection bias, self-driving car, sexual politics, sharing economy, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, Skype, smart cities, Smart Cities: Big Data, Civic Hackers, and the Quest for a New Utopia, smart contracts, Snapchat, speech recognition, Steve Bannon, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Steven Levy, technological singularity, the built environment, The Structural Transformation of the Public Sphere, The Wisdom of Crowds, Thomas L Friedman, Tragedy of the Commons, universal basic income, urban planning, Watson beat the top human players on Jeopardy!, working-age population, Yochai Benkler

Pedro Domingos, The Master Algorithm: How the Quest for the Ultimate Learning Machine Will Remake Our World (London: Allen Lane, 2015), 17. 36. Carole Cadwalladr, ‘Robert Mercer:The Big Data Billionaire Waging War on Mainstream Media’, The Guardian, 26 February 2017 <https:// www.theguardian.com/politics/2017/feb/26/robert-mercerbreitbart-war-on-media-steve-bannon-donald-trump-nigel-farage> (accessed 1 December 2017). 37. Edward L. Bernays, ‘The Engineering of Consent’, ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 250, no. 1 (1947), 113–20, cited in Zeynep Tufekci, ‘Engineering the Public: Big Data, Surveillance and Computational Politics’, First Monday 19, no. 7 (7 July 2014). 38.

Peter Martinez, ‘Study Reveals Whopping 48M Twitter Accounts Are Actually Bots’, CBS News, 10 March 2017 <http://www.cbsnews. com/news/48-million-twitter-accounts-bots-university-ofsouthern-california-study/?ftag=CNM-00-10aab7e&linkId= 35386687> (accessed 1 December 2017). 18. Carole Cadwalladr, ‘Robert Mercer:The Big Data Billionaire Waging War on Mainstream Media’, The Guardian, 26 February 2017 <https:// www.theguardian.com/politics/2017/feb/26/robert-mercer-breitbart-war-on-media-steve-bannon-donald-trump-nigel-farage> (accessed 1 December 2017). 19. See Leo Kelion and Shiroma Silva, ‘Pro-Clinton Bots “Fought Back but Outnumbered in Second Debate” ’, BBC News, 19 October 2016<http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-37703565> (accessed 1 December 2017); Amanda Hess, ‘On Twitter, a Battle Among Political Bots’, New York Times, 14 December 2016 <https://mobile. nytimes.com/2016/12/14/arts/on-twitter-a-battle-among-politicalbots.html?

s e t = 6 0 3 5 8 5 & u t m _ c o n t e n t = bu f f e rd 5 a 8 f & u t m _ m e d i u m = social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer> (accessed 1 Dec. 2017). Cadwalladr, Carole. ‘Robert Mercer: The Big Data Billionaire Waging War on Mainstream Media’. The Guardian, 26 Feb. 2017 <https://www. theguardian.com/politics/2017/feb/26/robert-mercer-breitbart-war-onmedia-steve-bannon-donald-trump-nigel-farage> (accessed 1 Dec. 2017). Calabresi, Guido, and Philip Bobbit. Tragic Choices: The Conflicts Society Confronts in the Allocation of Tragically Scarce Resources. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1978. OUP CORRECTED PROOF – FINAL, 28/05/18, SPi РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS Bibliography 445 Calvo, Rafael A., Sidney D’Mello, Jonathan Gratch, and Arvid Kappas, eds.


pages: 480 words: 123,979

Dawn of the New Everything: Encounters With Reality and Virtual Reality by Jaron Lanier

4chan, augmented reality, back-to-the-land, Bill Atkinson, Buckminster Fuller, Burning Man, carbon footprint, cloud computing, collaborative editing, commoditize, cosmological constant, creative destruction, crowdsourcing, Donald Trump, Douglas Engelbart, Douglas Hofstadter, El Camino Real, Elon Musk, Firefox, game design, general-purpose programming language, gig economy, Google Glasses, Grace Hopper, Gödel, Escher, Bach, Hacker Ethic, Howard Rheingold, impulse control, information asymmetry, invisible hand, Jaron Lanier, John von Neumann, Kevin Kelly, Kickstarter, Kuiper Belt, lifelogging, mandelbrot fractal, Mark Zuckerberg, Marshall McLuhan, Menlo Park, Minecraft, Mitch Kapor, Mondo 2000, Mother of all demos, Murray Gell-Mann, Netflix Prize, Network effects, new economy, Norbert Wiener, Oculus Rift, pattern recognition, Paul Erdős, profit motive, Ray Kurzweil, recommendation engine, Richard Feynman, Richard Stallman, Ronald Reagan, self-driving car, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, Skype, Snapchat, stem cell, Stephen Hawking, Steve Bannon, Steve Jobs, Steven Levy, Stewart Brand, technoutopianism, Ted Nelson, telemarketer, telepresence, telepresence robot, Thorstein Veblen, Turing test, Vernor Vinge, Whole Earth Catalog, Whole Earth Review, WikiLeaks, wikimedia commons

The tech companies have won most of the cash that used to flow to newspapers for ads and subscriptions. Therefore, there are few genuine, high-integrity primary news sources, compared to antebellum days. There is almost no remaining local investigative reporting. There are occasional bloggers who accomplish real investigative work, but mostly they can only comment. Steve Bannon claimed that “if The New York Times didn’t exist, CNN and MSNBC would be a test pattern. The Huffington Post and everything else is predicated on The New York Times … That was our opening.”6 He couldn’t have said this before the rise of the New Economy. The investigative press, which is distinct from the commenting class, used to be large and diverse.

Mayhem was also instigated with rather small amounts of cash, as chronicled in the other examples cited here. This is an example of how even insiders are still finding their way. The online world has become so murky that no one has a complete view. The strange new truth is that almost no one has privacy and yet no one knows what’s going on. 6.   http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/steve-bannon-trump-tower-interview-trumps-strategist-plots-new-political-movement-948747 7.   Described earlier, in the section called “Birth of a Religion.” Netflix uses AI recommendations to create the illusion that the selection of things to watch is larger than it is. 8.   https://www.buzzfeed.com/craigsilverman/how-macedonia-became-a-global-hub-for-pro-trump-misinfo?


Pure Invention: How Japan's Pop Culture Conquered the World by Matt Alt

4chan, augmented reality, blue-collar work, coronavirus, Covid-19, COVID-19, Donald Trump, game design, glass ceiling, global pandemic, haute cuisine, hive mind, lateral thinking, Mark Zuckerberg, mass immigration, megacity, New Urbanism, period drama, Ponzi scheme, Saturday Night Live, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, Skype, Steve Bannon, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, strikebreaker, union organizing, zero-sum game

Posted in the midst of Gamergate, this ornate otaku screed would likely have faded into oblivion were it not for a singular fact. It was one of the first articles published by an up-and-coming writer named Milo Yiannopoulos. Nobody knew who the thirty-year-old with the shocking bleach-blond coif was yet, but that was about to change, and fast. Yiannopoulos’s boss was a man named Steve Bannon, who believed that Breitbart could be more than just another news site. He wasn’t satisfied with being a website editor; he hungered to wield real political clout, to really change the dialogue—if only he could tap into the right network of people. “Rootless white males,” he called them. By rootless he basically meant otaku.

“Japanese culture enjoyed unique purchase”: Milo Yiannopoulos, “The Lost Franchise: Why Digimon Deserves a Glorious Renaissance,” Breitbart, November 20, 2014, https://www.breitbart.com/​europe/​2014/​11/​20/​the-lost-franchise-why-digimon-deserves-a-glorious-renaissance/​. “Rootless white males”: Joshua Green, Devil’s Bargain: Steve Bannon, Donald Trump, and the Nationalist Uprising (New York: Penguin, 2017), 145. A Pew study: Richard Fry, “For First Time in Modern Era, Living with Parents Edges Out Other Living Arrangements for 18- to 34-Year-Olds,” Pew Research Center, May 24, 2016, https://www.pewsocialtrends.org/​2016/​05/​24/​for-first-time-in-modern-era-living-with-parents-edges-out-other-living-arrangements-for-18-to-34-year-olds/​.


pages: 505 words: 138,917

Open: The Story of Human Progress by Johan Norberg

additive manufacturing, affirmative action, Albert Einstein, anti-globalists, basic income, Berlin Wall, Bernie Sanders, British Empire, business cycle, business process, California gold rush, citizen journalism, Clayton Christensen, clean water, cognitive dissonance, collective bargaining, Corn Laws, coronavirus, Covid-19, COVID-19, creative destruction, crony capitalism, decarbonisation, deindustrialization, Deng Xiaoping, digital map, Donald Trump, Fall of the Berlin Wall, falling living standards, Filter Bubble, financial innovation, Flynn Effect, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, future of work, Galaxy Zoo, George Gilder, Gini coefficient, global pandemic, global supply chain, global village, humanitarian revolution, illegal immigration, income per capita, Indoor air pollution, indoor plumbing, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), invisible hand, Isaac Newton, Islamic Golden Age, James Watt: steam engine, Jane Jacobs, Jeff Bezos, job automation, John von Neumann, joint-stock company, Joseph Schumpeter, Kickstarter, knowledge economy, labour mobility, Lao Tzu, liberal capitalism, manufacturing employment, mass immigration, Network effects, open borders, open economy, Pax Mongolica, place-making, profit motive, RAND corporation, regulatory arbitrage, rent control, Republic of Letters, road to serfdom, Ronald Reagan, Schrödinger's Cat, sharing economy, side project, Silicon Valley, spice trade, stem cell, Steve Bannon, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Steven Pinker, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thomas L Friedman, too big to fail, trade liberalization, trade route, transatlantic slave trade, Uber for X, ultimatum game, universal basic income, World Values Survey, Xiaogang Anhui farmers, zero-sum game

The Brexit referendum gave an injection of energy to the Trump movement, and Trump’s election energized populists all over Europe – agitators and parties who claim that there is one true, united people whose general will is blocked by a corrupt elite. So did money and media assistance from Putin’s Russia, which is eager to show that Western liberalism is obsolete. Meanwhile Western anti-liberals look to Putin as a source of inspiration because he ‘is standing up for traditional institutions’, as Steve Bannon puts it.9 We can’t live without openness, but the question is whether we can live with it. In the second half of the book, I examine why openness is always under threat, historically and right now. I will argue that the modern world was not intended, it almost happened by accident. It happened because there were too many gaps in the control of princes, priests and guilds to stop people’s creativity entirely.

Had natives back then known that six of the eight judges on the present US Supreme Court had been raised as Roman Catholics (and the remaining two Jews), they would surely have concluded that we live in a tragic future where despotism has won. Had they known that the Irish would by 2020 have captured the vice presidency (Mike Pence), the Senate (Mitch McConnell), the House Republicans (Kevin McCarthy), and were represented among former and present advisors to the president (Steve Bannon, Kellyanne Conway), they would probably have assumed that there had been a hostile takeover of the Republican party by anti-American globalists. Anti-Irish sentiment back then were so strong that it spawned a briefly successful political party, the ‘Know-Nothings’, so named because its early adherents refused to answer questions about the party.


pages: 215 words: 64,460

Shadows of Empire: The Anglosphere in British Politics by Michael Kenny, Nick Pearce

battle of ideas, Berlin Wall, Boris Johnson, Bretton Woods, British Empire, colonial rule, corporate governance, Dominic Cummings, Donald Trump, eurozone crisis, Fall of the Berlin Wall, floating exchange rates, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, full employment, global reserve currency, imperial preference, informal economy, invention of the telegraph, Khartoum Gordon, labour mobility, liberal capitalism, Mahatma Gandhi, mass immigration, Monroe Doctrine, Nixon shock, quantitative easing, reserve currency, Ronald Reagan, Steve Bannon, trade route, Washington Consensus

But while Trump may represent the negation of the liberal parts of this heritage, his accession also signals the renewal of an older version of Anglo-America which reaches back to the ethno-nationalism associated with the Anglo-Saxonist movement of the 1890s, and which regards both countries as linked by their shared ethnic and cultural origins. This, broadly, is the outlook promoted by the influential alt-right website Breitbart News and advanced by Trump's former chief strategist Steve Bannon. It coheres around support for stronger immigration controls, an aggressively anti-Muslim form of identity politics and greater protectionism for the jobs of the indigenous working class. Writing on the Breitbart site in 2016, James Pinkerton elaborated this position, invoking the Anglosphere as a potential alliance upon which an anti-Islamic Western order could be rebuilt.18 And, according to the former UKIP advisor (and one-time editor-in-chief of Breitbart News London) Raheem Kassam, ‘The whole Breitbart thing and the whole Trump narrative is about the Anglosphere, about free trade agreements with all the English speaking nations of the world.


pages: 1,172 words: 114,305

New Laws of Robotics: Defending Human Expertise in the Age of AI by Frank Pasquale

affirmative action, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Airbnb, algorithmic bias, Amazon Mechanical Turk, augmented reality, Automated Insights, autonomous vehicles, basic income, battle of ideas, Bernie Sanders, Bill Joy: nanobots, bitcoin, blockchain, call centre, citizen journalism, Clayton Christensen, collective bargaining, commoditize, computer vision, conceptual framework, coronavirus, corporate social responsibility, correlation does not imply causation, Covid-19, COVID-19, cryptocurrency, data is the new oil, decarbonisation, deskilling, digital twin, disinformation, disruptive innovation, don't be evil, Donald Trump, Douglas Engelbart, effective altruism, Elon Musk, en.wikipedia.org, Erik Brynjolfsson, Filter Bubble, finite state, Flash crash, future of work, Google Chrome, Google Glasses, high net worth, hiring and firing, Ian Bogost, independent contractor, informal economy, information asymmetry, information retrieval, interchangeable parts, invisible hand, Jaron Lanier, job automation, John Markoff, Joi Ito, Khan Academy, knowledge economy, late capitalism, Marc Andreessen, Mark Zuckerberg, means of production, medical malpractice, meta-analysis, Modern Monetary Theory, Money creation, move fast and break things, move fast and break things, mutually assured destruction, natural language processing, new economy, Nicholas Carr, Norbert Wiener, nuclear winter, obamacare, paradox of thrift, pattern recognition, payday loans, personalized medicine, Peter Singer: altruism, Philip Mirowski, pink-collar, Plutocrats, plutocrats, pre–internet, profit motive, QR code, quantitative easing, race to the bottom, RAND corporation, Ray Kurzweil, recommendation engine, regulatory arbitrage, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, Rodney Brooks, Ronald Reagan, self-driving car, sentiment analysis, Shoshana Zuboff, Silicon Valley, Singularitarianism, smart cities, smart contracts, software is eating the world, South China Sea, Steve Bannon, surveillance capitalism, TaskRabbit, technoutopianism, telepresence, telerobotics, The Future of Employment, Therac-25, Thorstein Veblen, too big to fail, Turing test, universal basic income, unorthodox policies, wage slave, Watson beat the top human players on Jeopardy!, working poor, Works Progress Administration, zero day

utm_term=.f857ac42b2e9; “Facebook: ‘No Evidence’ Conservative Stories Were Suppressed,” CBS News, May 10, 2016, http://www.cbsnews.com/news/facebook-no-evidence-conservative-stories-trending-suppressed-gizmodo/. 88. Josh Sternberg, “Layoffs and Local Journalism,” Media Nut, May 14, 2020, at https://medianut.substack.com/p/layoffs-and-local-journalism. 89. Rachael Revesz, “Steve Bannon’s Data Firm in Talks for Lucrative White House Contracts,” Independent, November 23, 2016, http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/cambridge-analytica-steve-bannon-robert-rebekah-mercer-donald-trump-conflicts-of-interest-white-a7435536.html; Josh Feldman, “CIA Concluded Russia Intervened in Election to Help Trump, WaPo Reports,” Mediaite, December 9, 2016, http://www.mediaite.com/online/cia-concluded-russia-intervened-in-election-to-help-trump-wapo-reports/. 90.


pages: 254 words: 68,133

The Age of Illusions: How America Squandered Its Cold War Victory by Andrew J. Bacevich

affirmative action, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, anti-communist, Bear Stearns, Berlin Wall, Bernie Sanders, clean water, Columbian Exchange, Credit Default Swap, cuban missile crisis, David Brooks, deindustrialization, Donald Trump, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, friendly fire, gig economy, global village, Gordon Gekko, greed is good, illegal immigration, income inequality, Jeff Bezos, Kickstarter, Marshall McLuhan, mass incarceration, Mikhail Gorbachev, Monroe Doctrine, Norman Mailer, obamacare, Occupy movement, planetary scale, Plutocrats, plutocrats, Potemkin village, price stability, Project for a New American Century, Ronald Reagan, Ronald Reagan: Tear down this wall, Saturday Night Live, school choice, Seymour Hersh, Silicon Valley, Steve Bannon, Thomas L Friedman, too big to fail, trickle-down economics, WikiLeaks

Between Trump’s election and the end of his first year in office, for example, Charles Blow published eighty-eight columns in the Times, fifty-six targeting Trump specifically. Of the remainder, most tore into various reprobates who fleetingly passed through Trump’s orbit, including Michael Flynn, Steve Bannon, Omarosa Manigault, and Anthony “The Mooch” Scaramucci. On those rare occasions when Blow refrained from going after Trump or his associates, he devoted himself to promoting the anti-Trump resistance, for which he served as a vocal cheerleader. Throughout, Blow’s tone was unremittingly contemptuous of the president and anyone in his employ.


pages: 138 words: 43,748

Conscience of a Conservative: A Rejection of Destructive Politics and a Return to Principle by Jeff Flake

4chan, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, battle of ideas, Berlin Wall, cognitive dissonance, crony capitalism, David Brooks, disinformation, Donald Trump, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, global supply chain, immigration reform, impulse control, invisible hand, Mark Zuckerberg, obamacare, Potemkin village, race to the bottom, road to serfdom, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, Steve Bannon, uranium enrichment, zero-sum game

A report on the tech website Gizmodo quoted a former Facebook “news curator” who said that conservative viewpoints were sometimes “black-listed,” which, if true, was a very disturbing allegation. Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg denied the claim but, recognizing the seriousness of the issue, convened a roundtable in May 2016 with conservative media figures, including Glenn Beck, S. E. Cupp, Dana Perino, and Brent Bozell (Breitbart.com, then still run by Steve Bannon, was invited but declined to attend) to give assurances and seek solutions. Zuckerberg released a statement, which read in part: “To serve our diverse community, we are committed to building a platform for all ideas. Trending Topics is designed to surface the most newsworthy and popular conversations on Facebook.


pages: 134 words: 41,085

The Wake-Up Call: Why the Pandemic Has Exposed the Weakness of the West, and How to Fix It by John Micklethwait, Adrian Wooldridge

Admiral Zheng, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, basic income, battle of ideas, Berlin Wall, Bernie Sanders, Boris Johnson, carried interest, cashless society, central bank independence, Corn Laws, coronavirus, Covid-19, COVID-19, creative destruction, David Ricardo: comparative advantage, Deng Xiaoping, Dominic Cummings, Donald Trump, Etonian, failed state, Fall of the Berlin Wall, global pandemic, Internet of things, invisible hand, James Carville said: "I would like to be reincarnated as the bond market. You can intimidate everybody.", Jones Act, knowledge economy, laissez-faire capitalism, McMansion, night-watchman state, offshore financial centre, oil shock, Panopticon Jeremy Bentham, Parkinson's law, pensions crisis, QR code, rent control, road to serfdom, Ronald Reagan, school vouchers, Shoshana Zuboff, Silicon Valley, smart cities, Steve Bannon, surveillance capitalism, trade route, universal basic income, Washington Consensus

Johnson’s Conservatives won the British election in 2019 on a platform of spending more on just about everything (just less than Jeremy Corbyn). At the end of June, Johnson delivered a speech comparing himself to FDR in his desire to “build, build, build.” In America Trumpism rejected decades’ worth of Republican orthodoxy on free trade and small government. Steve Bannon, the mastermind of Trump’s election victory, has long thought limited-government conservatism is old hat.16 For him the idea that you can remain dependent on China for vital goods like medical supplies while pushing back against that country’s geo-strategic ambitions is absurd. His former colleague in the White House, Peter Navarro, has declared that “never again should we have to depend on the rest of the world for our essential medicines and countermeasures.”17 Even conservatives are asking: what good was globalization in the crisis?


pages: 497 words: 123,778

The People vs. Democracy: Why Our Freedom Is in Danger and How to Save It by Yascha Mounk

affirmative action, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Andrew Keen, basic income, battle of ideas, Boris Johnson, Branko Milanovic, Bretton Woods, business cycle, Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty, carried interest, Cass Sunstein, central bank independence, centre right, clean water, cognitive bias, conceptual framework, David Brooks, deindustrialization, demographic transition, desegregation, disinformation, Donald Trump, en.wikipedia.org, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, German hyperinflation, gig economy, Gini coefficient, Herbert Marcuse, Home mortgage interest deduction, housing crisis, income inequality, invention of the printing press, invention of the steam engine, investor state dispute settlement, job automation, Joseph Schumpeter, land value tax, low skilled workers, Lyft, manufacturing employment, Mark Zuckerberg, mass immigration, microaggression, mortgage tax deduction, Naomi Klein, new economy, offshore financial centre, open borders, Parag Khanna, Plutocrats, plutocrats, post-materialism, price stability, ride hailing / ride sharing, rising living standards, Ronald Reagan, Rosa Parks, secular stagnation, sharing economy, Steve Bannon, Thomas L Friedman, Tyler Cowen: Great Stagnation, Uber and Lyft, uber lyft, universal basic income, upwardly mobile, World Values Survey, zero-sum game

Donald Trump Solved It,” New York Times, April 4, 2017, https://www.nytimes.com/2017/04/04/magazine/cnn-had-a-problem-donald-trump-solved-it.html?_r=0. 19. See Wil S. Hylton, “Down the Breitbart Hole,” New York Times Magazine, August 16, 2017, https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/16/magazine/breitbart-alt-right-steve-bannon.html; Michael M. Grynbaum and John Herrman, “Breitbart Rises from Outlier to Potent Voice in Campaign,” New York Times, August 26, 2016, https://www.nytimes.com/2016/08/27/business/media/breitbart-news-presidential-race.html; David van Drehle, “Is Steve Bannon the Second Most Powerful Man in the World?” Time Magazine, February 2, 2017. 20. “Pope Francis Shocks World, Endorses Donald Trump for President, Releases Statement,” Newsbreakshere, September 27, 2016, https://newsbreakshere.com/pope-francis-shocks-world-endorses-donald-trump-president-releases-statement. 21.


pages: 352 words: 80,030

The New Silk Roads: The Present and Future of the World by Peter Frankopan

active measures, Berlin Wall, bitcoin, blockchain, Boris Johnson, cashless society, clean water, cryptocurrency, Deng Xiaoping, don't be evil, Donald Trump, Ethereum, ethereum blockchain, F. W. de Klerk, failed state, Fall of the Berlin Wall, global supply chain, illegal immigration, income inequality, invisible hand, land reform, Mark Zuckerberg, mass incarceration, Nelson Mandela, purchasing power parity, ransomware, Rubik’s Cube, smart cities, South China Sea, sovereign wealth fund, Steve Bannon, trade route, trickle-down economics, UNCLOS, urban planning, WikiLeaks, zero-sum game

This was one reason why Trump upbraided the Saudi crown prince when the latter visited Washington in the spring of 2018, telling Mohammad bin Salman that he should have increased his spending and that sums of several hundred million dollars ‘are peanuts to you’.6 Saudi Arabia is ‘a very great friend’, Trump said when receiving the crown prince, because it is ‘a big purchaser of equipment and lots of other things’.7 This explains why Saudi had been singled out for special treatment, as is clear from the fact that when Mike Pompeo was appointed CIA director in 2017 he lost no time in telling his hosts in Riyadh that his first overseas trip was to Saudi Arabia, just as President Trump’s had been.8 Trump’s visit to Riyadh in 2017 had certainly been memorable. Indeed, said the president later, it was ‘one of the most incredible two-day meetings that I’ve ever seen – that anybody has ever seen’. Those who saw Trump, secretary of state Rex Tillerson and his then chief strategist Steve Bannon attend exhibitions of sword-dancing and hop about uncomfortably as they took part in festivities alongside their Saudi hosts would agree.9 Trump’s alignment with Saudi has consequences for proposed arms sales elsewhere in the region. In 2017, visiting Qatar, the president had addressed the Gulf state’s leader and told him, ‘We are friends.


pages: 330 words: 83,319

The New Rules of War: Victory in the Age of Durable Disorder by Sean McFate

active measures, anti-communist, barriers to entry, Berlin Wall, blood diamonds, cognitive dissonance, commoditize, computer vision, corporate governance, corporate raider, cuban missile crisis, disinformation, Donald Trump, double helix, drone strike, European colonialism, failed state, hive mind, index fund, invisible hand, John Markoff, joint-stock company, moral hazard, mutually assured destruction, Nash equilibrium, offshore financial centre, pattern recognition, Peace of Westphalia, Plutocrats, plutocrats, private military company, profit motive, RAND corporation, ransomware, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, South China Sea, Steve Bannon, Stuxnet, technoutopianism, Washington Consensus, Westphalian system, yellow journalism, Yom Kippur War, zero day, zero-sum game

Frustrated politicians and activists blame the deep state for undermining them, and people roll their eyes. The concept of the deep state has been around for years, but the term was unknown to most in the West and especially the United States until recently. President Trump’s alt-right defenders and his former chief strategist Steve Bannon have blamed the deep state for trying to delegitimize the president. Articles in Breitbart News, where Bannon served as executive chairman before and after working for Trump, have invoked the idea repeatedly. Critics balk at this accusation, reaching for tinfoil hats while lampooning alt-righters as paranoid weirdos.


pages: 324 words: 86,056

The Socialist Manifesto: The Case for Radical Politics in an Era of Extreme Inequality by Bhaskar Sunkara

Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, agricultural Revolution, Bernie Sanders, British Empire, business climate, business cycle, capital controls, centre right, Charles Lindbergh, collective bargaining, Deng Xiaoping, deskilling, Donald Trump, equal pay for equal work, feminist movement, Ferguson, Missouri, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, full employment, gig economy, Gunnar Myrdal, happiness index / gross national happiness, Honoré de Balzac, income inequality, inventory management, labor-force participation, land reform, land value tax, Mark Zuckerberg, means of production, Mikhail Gorbachev, Neil Kinnock, new economy, Occupy movement, postindustrial economy, precariat, race to the bottom, Ralph Waldo Emerson, self-driving car, Silicon Valley, single-payer health, Steve Bannon, telemarketer, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, too big to fail, union organizing, Upton Sinclair, urban renewal, We are the 99%

He brought with him a contradictory set of politics: a right-populist challenge to both NATO and the network of US-led free trade deals, on the one hand, and more traditional pro-business Republican pledges, on the other. The parts that got through, not surprisingly, were those that capital found more acceptable. Paul Ryan–backed tax cuts have been passed, but Trump’s more extreme protectionist plans have gotten stymied, and gone is Steve Bannon, along with his dreams of a massive jobs program built around deficit-financed infrastructure construction. If these are the pressures that rabidly pro-capitalist Trump was under, we can only imagine the forces that could be brought to bear on a President Sanders in 2021. For one thing, he would have to contend with a vicious media offensive—each new policy or proposal would be systematically smeared, with eager help from corporate Democrats.


pages: 276 words: 81,153

Outnumbered: From Facebook and Google to Fake News and Filter-Bubbles – the Algorithms That Control Our Lives by David Sumpter

affirmative action, algorithmic bias, Bernie Sanders, correlation does not imply causation, crowdsourcing, disinformation, don't be evil, Donald Trump, Elon Musk, Filter Bubble, Google Glasses, illegal immigration, Jeff Bezos, job automation, Kenneth Arrow, Loebner Prize, Mark Zuckerberg, meta-analysis, Minecraft, Nate Silver, natural language processing, Nelson Mandela, p-value, prediction markets, random walk, Ray Kurzweil, Robert Mercer, selection bias, self-driving car, Silicon Valley, Skype, Snapchat, speech recognition, statistical model, Stephen Hawking, Steve Bannon, Steven Pinker, The Signal and the Noise by Nate Silver, traveling salesman, Turing test

He claimed that he could use ‘hundreds and thousands of individual data points on our target audiences to understand exactly which messages are going to appeal to which audiences’ and implied that the methods he had described were being used by the Trump campaign. The origins of Cambridge Analytica has all the ingredients of a modern conspiracy story. It involves Ted Cruz, Donald Trump, data security, the psychology of personality, Facebook, underpaid Mechanical Turk workers, big data, Cambridge University academics, right-wing populist Steve Bannon who sits on the board, right-wing financier Robert Mercer who is one of its biggest investors, one-time national security advisor Michael Flynn who has acted as consultant, and (in some less reliable versions of the story) Russian-sponsored trolls. I can imagine it as a film with Jesse Eisenberg playing a psychologist who gradually uncovers the true motives of the company he works for: to manipulate our every emotion for political means.


pages: 324 words: 80,217

The Decadent Society: How We Became the Victims of Our Own Success by Ross Douthat

Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, AI winter, Bernie Sanders, bitcoin, Burning Man, Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty, centre right, charter city, crack epidemic, crowdsourcing, David Graeber, Deng Xiaoping, Donald Trump, East Village, Elon Musk, Flynn Effect, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, Francisco Pizarro, ghettoisation, gig economy, Haight Ashbury, helicopter parent, hive mind, Hyperloop, immigration reform, informal economy, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Islamic Golden Age, Jeff Bezos, Joan Didion, Kevin Kelly, Kickstarter, knowledge worker, life extension, mass immigration, mass incarceration, means of production, megacity, microaggression, move fast and break things, move fast and break things, multiplanetary species, New Journalism, Nicholas Carr, Norman Mailer, obamacare, Oculus Rift, open borders, out of africa, Panopticon Jeremy Bentham, Peter Thiel, Plutocrats, plutocrats, pre–internet, QAnon, quantitative easing, rent-seeking, Robert Bork, Robert Gordon, Ronald Reagan, secular stagnation, self-driving car, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley ideology, Snapchat, social web, Steve Bannon, Steve Jobs, Steven Pinker, technoutopianism, the built environment, The Rise and Fall of American Growth, Tyler Cowen: Great Stagnation, wage slave, WeWork, women in the workforce, Y2K

But Alex Jones just believes in selling supplements, Donald Trump just believes in selling Donald Trump, and a remarkable amount of online extremism is a mix of irony memes and pranks and playacting, with anonymous trolls competing with very public grifters to exploit an aging society’s anxieties and a drifting youthful population’s appetite for stimulation. The reason that Steve Bannon achieved—for a brief spell—so much celebrity was that almost alone among Trumpian figures, he seemed to have a coherent philosophy beyond grifting, and I emphasize that “seemed” because there’s a possibility that all his name-checks of fascist intellectuals were part of the grift as well. The reason that the Antifa kids favor masks is that an awful lot of them are playacting their revolution, and they don’t want to put their names and faces to something that’s fundamentally just a game.


pages: 182 words: 55,234

Rendezvous With Oblivion: Reports From a Sinking Society by Thomas Frank

Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Bernie Sanders, big-box store, business climate, business cycle, call centre, crowdsourcing, David Brooks, deindustrialization, deskilling, Donald Trump, edge city, Frank Gehry, high net worth, income inequality, Jane Jacobs, Jeff Bezos, McMansion, new economy, New Urbanism, obamacare, offshore financial centre, Plutocrats, plutocrats, Ponzi scheme, profit maximization, prosperity theology / prosperity gospel / gospel of success, Ralph Nader, Richard Florida, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, single-payer health, Steve Bannon, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, too big to fail, urban planning, Washington Consensus, Works Progress Administration

Other measures would deliver a fleeting sugar high. Still others would have no impact at all, aside from appearances. But any single one of them might just be sufficient to produce the deadly phenomenon we know as Trump’s reelection, while knitting together the new, faux-proletarian Republican Party that Steve Bannon used to fantasize about, that he once dreamed would “govern for a hundred years.” Before you close this book, chuckle cynically, and take a sip of bourbon, think for a second about the cultural and political delusions a roaring economy and rising wages would surely generate—just as the tech mania of the late 1990s did, and just as the bull market of the 1980s did.


pages: 173 words: 55,328

Last Best Hope: America in Crisis and Renewal by George Packer

affirmative action, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, anti-communist, Berlin Wall, Bernie Sanders, blue-collar work, Branko Milanovic, British Empire, business cycle, Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty, collective bargaining, coronavirus, Covid-19, COVID-19, crony capitalism, deindustrialization, desegregation, disinformation, Donald Trump, failed state, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Ferguson, Missouri, full employment, ghettoisation, gig economy, glass ceiling, informal economy, Jeff Bezos, knowledge economy, liberal capitalism, Lyft, Mark Zuckerberg, mass immigration, minimum wage unemployment, new economy, Norman Mailer, obamacare, postindustrial economy, prosperity theology / prosperity gospel / gospel of success, QAnon, ride hailing / ride sharing, road to serfdom, Ronald Reagan, school vouchers, self-driving car, Silicon Valley, Steve Bannon, too big to fail, Uber and Lyft, uber lyft, Upton Sinclair, white flight, working poor, young professional

The power-hungry leaders of Free America used Trump’s presidency and his political failings to squeeze more plunder out of the economy and more breath out of government by the people. This describes what happened under Trump, but it doesn’t account for what made him new and powerful. He represented a social and political phenomenon that eludes standard left/right categories. Was he then a fascist with a Queens accent? Some of Trump’s advisors, like Steve Bannon, claimed inspiration from European reactionaries of the twenties and thirties. At times the cocked-chin Trump seemed to style himself after Mussolini or Franco. In 2017 he gave a speech before a rapturous crowd in Warsaw on the enemies of Western civilization, and you can almost picture him in a white uniform with gold braid and a red sash: “Americans, Poles, and the nations of Europe value individual freedom and sovereignty.


pages: 530 words: 154,505

Bibi: The Turbulent Life and Times of Benjamin Netanyahu by Anshel Pfeffer

Ayatollah Khomeini, British Empire, centre right, different worldview, Donald Trump, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, friendly fire, full employment, high net worth, illegal immigration, Mikhail Gorbachev, Mount Scopus, Occupy movement, offshore financial centre, pre–internet, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, Steve Bannon, Stuxnet, Thomas L Friedman, uranium enrichment, Yom Kippur War

The website that Solov and Breitbart envisioned, Solov said, “would be unapologetically pro-freedom and pro-Israel. We were sick of the anti-Israel bias of the mainstream media and J-Street.”3 Most American Jews were horrified by Trump’s victory and by the reports of the alleged anti-Semitic views of Steve Bannon, who had been Breitbart’s editor-in-chief and was now Trump’s chief strategist. But Ron Dermer, who knew Bannon, reported that he was “very pro-Israel.” To Netanyahu, that was all that mattered. Netanyahu and Bannon shared a unique historical belief. Both had been brought up—Bibi by his historian father and Bannon by his Catholic parents and teachers—to view the “Reconquista,” the fifteenth-century Christian victory over the Muslim Moors in Spain, as a key moment in history when “Western civilization was saved” from the Muslims.4 Benzion taught Bibi that this was the precedent for the return of the Jews to their land.

Hillary Clinton to Fareed Zakaria: Putin Indirectly Responsible for MH17,” CNN, July 27, 2014, http://cnnpressroom.blogs.cnn.com/2014/07/27/fmr-sec-hillary-clinton-to-fareed-zakaria-putin-indirectly-responsible-for-mh17. 2. Anshel Pfeffer, “The Collapsing Political Triangle Linking Adelson, Netanyahu and Trump,” Haaretz, November 8, 2016. 3. Larry Solov, “Breitbart News Network: Born in the USA, Conceived in Israel,” Breitbart, November 17, 2015. 4. Joshua Green, Devil’s Bargain: Steve Bannon, Donald Trump, and the Storming of the Presidency (New York: Penguin Press, 2017), 51. 5. Twitter, @amit_segal, December 12, 2016. 6. Monica Langley, “Trump in Exclusive Interview Tells WSJ He Is Willing to Keep Parts of Obama Health Law,” Wall Street Journal, November 11, 2016. 7. Barak Ravid, “Trump Declines to Endorse Two-State Solution, Calls on Netanyahu to Hold Back on Settlements,” Haaretz, February 16, 2017. 8.


pages: 651 words: 186,130

This Is How They Tell Me the World Ends: The Cyberweapons Arms Race by Nicole Perlroth

4chan, active measures, activist lawyer, Airbnb, Albert Einstein, barriers to entry, Bernie Sanders, bitcoin, blood diamonds, Boeing 737 MAX, Brian Krebs, cloud computing, commoditize, coronavirus, Covid-19, COVID-19, crony capitalism, crowdsourcing, cryptocurrency, dark matter, defense in depth, disinformation, don't be evil, Donald Trump, drone strike, Edward Snowden, failed state, Ferguson, Missouri, Firefox, gender pay gap, global pandemic, global supply chain, index card, Internet of things, invisible hand, Jacob Appelbaum, Jeff Bezos, John Markoff, Marc Andreessen, Mark Zuckerberg, mass immigration, Menlo Park, MITM: man-in-the-middle, moral hazard, move fast and break things, move fast and break things, mutually assured destruction, natural language processing, offshore financial centre, open borders, pirate software, purchasing power parity, race to the bottom, RAND corporation, ransomware, rolodex, Rubik’s Cube, Sand Hill Road, Seymour Hersh, side project, Silicon Valley, Skype, smart cities, smart grid, South China Sea, Steve Ballmer, Steve Bannon, Steve Jobs, Steven Levy, Stuxnet, the scientific method, Tim Cook: Apple, undersea cable, uranium enrichment, web application, WikiLeaks, zero day, Zimmermann PGP

If their goal had all been to help elect Trump, then the Shadow Brokers had grown disillusioned with their candidate. Attached to their leak was a long list of political grievances: With the ease of a seasoned American pundit, the Shadow Brokers addressed Trump directly. They wanted the president to know they were upset about Steve Bannon’s recent removal from the National Security Council; the Pentagon’s strike on Syria one day earlier; the “deep state”; the Freedom Caucus in Congress; and white privilege. “TheShadowBrokers is wanting to see you succeed,” the Shadow Brokers told Trump. “TheShadowBrokers is wanting America to be great again.”

He spoke the words matter-of-factly but, given the truth famine we found ourselves in, they landed like the words of a renegade soldier, and Trump and his minions punished him for it. “Chris, you don’t see any activity from China, even though it is a FAR greater threat than Russia, Russia, Russia. They will both, plus others be able to interfere in our 2020 Election with our totally vulnerable Unsolicited (Counterfeit?) Ballot Scam,” Trump tweeted. Steve Bannon, the president’s far-right-hand man, later called for Wray—and Dr. Anthony Fauci, the infectious disease expert—to be beheaded as a warning to federal workers who dared question the president’s propaganda. We had all spent the past four years worried what our foreign adversaries were planning.


pages: 222 words: 70,132

Move Fast and Break Things: How Facebook, Google, and Amazon Cornered Culture and Undermined Democracy by Jonathan Taplin

1960s counterculture, affirmative action, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Airbnb, Amazon Mechanical Turk, American Legislative Exchange Council, Apple's 1984 Super Bowl advert, back-to-the-land, barriers to entry, basic income, battle of ideas, big data - Walmart - Pop Tarts, bitcoin, Brewster Kahle, Buckminster Fuller, Burning Man, Clayton Christensen, commoditize, creative destruction, crony capitalism, crowdsourcing, data is the new oil, David Brooks, David Graeber, don't be evil, Donald Trump, Douglas Engelbart, Douglas Engelbart, Dynabook, Edward Snowden, Elon Musk, equal pay for equal work, Erik Brynjolfsson, future of journalism, future of work, George Akerlof, George Gilder, Google bus, Hacker Ethic, Herbert Marcuse, Howard Rheingold, income inequality, informal economy, information asymmetry, information retrieval, Internet Archive, Internet of things, invisible hand, Jaron Lanier, Jeff Bezos, job automation, John Markoff, John Maynard Keynes: technological unemployment, John von Neumann, Joseph Schumpeter, Kevin Kelly, Kickstarter, labor-force participation, life extension, Marc Andreessen, Mark Zuckerberg, Menlo Park, Metcalfe’s law, Mother of all demos, move fast and break things, move fast and break things, natural language processing, Network effects, new economy, Norbert Wiener, offshore financial centre, packet switching, Paul Graham, paypal mafia, Peter Thiel, Plutocrats, plutocrats, pre–internet, Ray Kurzweil, recommendation engine, rent-seeking, revision control, Robert Bork, Robert Gordon, Robert Metcalfe, Ronald Reagan, Ross Ulbricht, Sam Altman, Sand Hill Road, secular stagnation, self-driving car, sharing economy, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley ideology, smart grid, Snapchat, software is eating the world, Steve Bannon, Steve Jobs, Stewart Brand, technoutopianism, The Chicago School, The Market for Lemons, The Rise and Fall of American Growth, Tim Cook: Apple, trade route, Tragedy of the Commons, transfer pricing, Travis Kalanick, trickle-down economics, Tyler Cowen: Great Stagnation, universal basic income, unpaid internship, We wanted flying cars, instead we got 140 characters, web application, Whole Earth Catalog, winner-take-all economy, women in the workforce, Y Combinator, you are the product

George, according to alt-righters, is neither an English street nor a Muslim street—separation is necessary for distinctiveness.” Asked why he supported Trump, Milo replied, “Trump represents the best hope we have of smashing political correctness apart.… I want a new political re-alignment on libertarian-authoritarian lines rather than left and right.” And when Trump hired the CEO of Breitbart, Steve Bannon, to run his campaign, a Washington Post columnist noted that it represented “the dangerous seizure of the conservative movement by the Alt-Right.” But for Milo, Peter Thiel is a hero on par with Trump for funding the Hulk Hogan lawsuit against Gawker. “With his lawsuit,” he wrote, “Thiel has perhaps done more than any man to liberate social media from the terror of left-wing public shaming that prevailed in the golden age of Gawker.


pages: 428 words: 103,544

The Data Detective: Ten Easy Rules to Make Sense of Statistics by Tim Harford

access to a mobile phone, Ada Lovelace, affirmative action, algorithmic bias, Automated Insights, banking crisis, basic income, Black Swan, Bretton Woods, British Empire, business cycle, Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty, Cass Sunstein, clean water, collapse of Lehman Brothers, coronavirus, correlation does not imply causation, Covid-19, COVID-19, cuban missile crisis, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, David Attenborough, Diane Coyle, disinformation, Donald Trump, Estimating the Reproducibility of Psychological Science, experimental subject, financial innovation, Florence Nightingale: pie chart, Gini coefficient, Hans Rosling, income inequality, Isaac Newton, job automation, Kickstarter, life extension, meta-analysis, microcredit, Milgram experiment, moral panic, Netflix Prize, Paul Samuelson, publication bias, publish or perish, random walk, randomized controlled trial, recommendation engine, replication crisis, Richard Feynman, Richard Thaler, rolodex, Ronald Reagan, selection bias, sentiment analysis, Silicon Valley, sorting algorithm, statistical model, stem cell, Stephen Hawking, Steve Bannon, Steven Pinker, survivorship bias, universal basic income, When a measure becomes a target

Robert Proctor, a historian who has spent decades studying the tobacco industry, calls modern politics “a golden age of ignorance.” Much as many smokers would like to keep smoking, many of us are fondly attached to our gut instincts on political questions. All politicians need to do is persuade us to doubt evidence that would challenge those instincts. As Donald Trump’s former right-hand man Steve Bannon infamously told the writer Michael Lewis: “The Democrats don’t matter. The real opposition is the media. And the way to deal with them is to flood the zone with shit.”15 The history of another term associated with Donald Trump—“fake news”—is instructive here. Originally, it described a very specific phenomenon: websites publishing false articles in the hope of getting clicks from social media and thus advertising dollars.


Reset by Ronald J. Deibert

23andMe, active measures, Airbnb, Amazon Web Services, augmented reality, availability heuristic, bitcoin, blockchain, blood diamonds, Buckminster Fuller, business intelligence, Cal Newport, call centre, carbon footprint, cashless society, clean water, cloud computing, computer vision, coronavirus, corporate social responsibility, Covid-19, COVID-19, crowdsourcing, data acquisition, data is the new oil, decarbonisation, Deng Xiaoping, disinformation, Donald Trump, Doomsday Clock, Edward Snowden, Elon Musk, en.wikipedia.org, failed state, game design, gig economy, global pandemic, global supply chain, global village, Google Hangouts, income inequality, information retrieval, Internet of things, Jaron Lanier, Jeff Bezos, John Markoff, liberal capitalism, license plate recognition, longitudinal study, Mark Zuckerberg, Marshall McLuhan, mass immigration, megastructure, meta-analysis, move fast and break things, move fast and break things, Naomi Klein, natural language processing, New Journalism, Peter Thiel, planetary scale, QAnon, ransomware, Robert Mercer, Shoshana Zuboff, Silicon Valley, Skype, Snapchat, sorting algorithm, source of truth, sovereign wealth fund, speech recognition, Steve Bannon, Steve Jobs, Stuxnet, surveillance capitalism, the medium is the message, The Structural Transformation of the Public Sphere, undersea cable, Vannevar Bush, WikiLeaks, zero day, zero-sum game

Before it was kicked off Facebook’s platforms for breaching the company’s terms of service (and let’s face it, Facebook probably kicked it off only because of the bad publicity), it vacuumed up data on hundreds of thousands of unwitting users and 87 million of their even less witting networks of friends to fine-tune precision messaging and behaviour manipulation of tiny segments of target populations. Cambridge Analytica had the support of a group of wealthy but highly dubious backers, including conservative muckraker and Trump supporter Steve Bannon and billionaire right-winger Robert Mercer. More ominously, it also had links to the U.K. and U.S. defence establishments. These political and financial supporters helped the company recognize that their psychometric profiling expertise, normally applied to digital marketing, could easily be repurposed for political campaigns, however unethically or illegally.


pages: 291 words: 77,596

Total Recall: How the E-Memory Revolution Will Change Everything by Gordon Bell, Jim Gemmell

airport security, Albert Einstein, book scanning, cloud computing, conceptual framework, Douglas Engelbart, full text search, information retrieval, invention of writing, inventory management, Isaac Newton, John Markoff, lifelogging, Menlo Park, optical character recognition, pattern recognition, performance metric, RAND corporation, RFID, semantic web, Silicon Valley, Skype, social web, statistical model, Stephen Hawking, Steve Ballmer, Steve Bannon, Ted Nelson, telepresence, Turing test, Vannevar Bush, web application

See also privacy issues antisocial behavior AOL Apple appliances archivists arguments artificial intelligence “As We May Think” (Bush) associative memory astronomy asynchronous logic Atlantic Monthly AT&T audio recordings and files and human development research and legal issues and lifelogging and memex and metadata and note taking and storytelling and total data collection and travelogues auditory learners Augment system autofill features autographs automatic teller machines (ATMs) automation automobiles availability of information. See also searching data avatars Azure B Baby Boomer backing-up data Baldridge, Aimee Ballmer, Steve Bannon, Liam Barclay, Tom battery technology battlefield awareness Bay Area Research Center (BARC) Bell Electric Bickmore, Timothy billing statements See also financial and transaction data biographies biomarker testing biometric sensors and battery technology and cardiac health forerunners of and health management and lifelogging and miniaturization and StartleCam and unified communications BitLocker BlackBerry blocking memories blogs and blogging blood pressure data blood sampling BodyBugg boilerplate forms bookmarks books Brahe, Tycho Brain Age Brain Fitness Program A Brief History of Time (Hawking) British Library British National Health Service Bush, Vannevar and higher learning and lifelong learning and memex on scientific research and “trails,” business card scanners Business Channel C calendars Calvin, John cameras and bio-memory and digitizing images and electronic memory and GPS technology and health data and implementation of Total Recall, and lifelogging and memex and miniaturization and picture-taking mirrors and scanners and SenseCam and smartphones and Soldier Assist System and storytelling and surveillance and travelogues and user interfaces and Wi-Fi Canada Canyon Ranch wellness center Car Talk (radio) cardiac health Carnegie Mellon University Carved in Sand (Ramin) categorization schemes .


pages: 231 words: 71,299

Culture Warlords: My Journey Into the Dark Web of White Supremacy by Talia Lavin

4chan, coronavirus, COVID-19, disinformation, Donald Trump, epigenetics, feminist movement, Ferguson, Missouri, game design, mass immigration, Minecraft, move fast and break things, move fast and break things, phenotype, Scientific racism, Silicon Valley, Snapchat, Steve Bannon, zero-sum game, éminence grise

To these extremists, the fact that there wasn’t an Einsatzgruppen shooting minorities and Jews in the streets, and they hadn’t been invited to join, was reason enough to abandon their electoral hopes in Trump as savior of their movement. Trump’s overtly racist campaign, election, and inauguration reinvigorated white-supremacist activity in the United States, both bolstering and expanding extant groups and resulting in a proliferation of new fascist groups. It didn’t hurt that Steve Bannon, an ideologue openly friendly to the alt-right, managed Trump’s campaign in its final days. Yet over the ensuing years, the tenor of fascist rhetoric with regard to the Oval Office has changed from triumphant to disillusioned. While Trumpism awakened and emboldened the movement—enabling white nationalists to feel that they were going to be electorally represented at a federal level—their own impatience, and the ways Trump himself has made peace with the mores of the conservative elite he had once promised to defeat, have steadily chipped away at that hope.


pages: 338 words: 74,302

Only Americans Burn in Hell by Jarett Kobek

AltaVista, coherent worldview, corporate governance, crony capitalism, Donald Trump, East Village, ghettoisation, Google Chrome, haute couture, illegal immigration, indoor plumbing, Jeff Bezos, mandelbrot fractal, MITM: man-in-the-middle, pre–internet, sexual politics, Seymour Hersh, Skype, Snapchat, Steve Bannon, Steve Jobs, Telecommunications Act of 1996

But here’s the real significance: Breitbart is the only person, throughout the entire event, who doesn’t insult Drudge or treat him like a child who’s been caught stealing cookies. Breitbart went on to found the Breitbart News Network, a website which by the Year of the Froward Worm had become the dominant voice of the Far Right in America. When Breitbart died in 2012 AD, presumably from a toxic mix of being both a drug freak and a huge fucking asshole, a guy named Steve Bannon ended up in control of the Breitbart News Network. In August of 2016 AD, he became Chief Executive Officer of Donald J. Trump’s Presidential campaign. When Trump assumed the Presidency, Bannon went to the White House. When Blumenthal sued Drudge, Drudge didn’t have any resources to mount a legal defense.


pages: 434 words: 117,327

Can It Happen Here?: Authoritarianism in America by Cass R. Sunstein

active measures, affirmative action, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, airline deregulation, anti-communist, anti-globalists, availability heuristic, business cycle, Cass Sunstein, David Brooks, disinformation, Donald Trump, Edward Snowden, Estimating the Reproducibility of Psychological Science, failed state, Filter Bubble, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, Garrett Hardin, ghettoisation, illegal immigration, immigration reform, Isaac Newton, job automation, Joseph Schumpeter, Long Term Capital Management, microaggression, Nate Silver, Network effects, New Journalism, night-watchman state, obamacare, Potemkin village, random walk, Richard Thaler, road to serfdom, Ronald Reagan, Steve Bannon, the scientific method, Tragedy of the Commons, War on Poverty, WikiLeaks, World Values Survey

The problem with Trumpian rule has been one of chaos much more than totalitarianism. Furthermore, the Trump associates who sometimes are considered the “most fascistic” (it is beyond the scope of this essay to evaluate such charges, so here I am simply referring to the perception) largely have been forced out or lost influence, including Michael Flynn and Steve Bannon. Actual fascists these days don’t have extensive experience in government at high levels, and they are unlikely to find such environments conducive to their goals and temperaments. That makes it very hard for a potential fascistic revolution to get off the ground. And the larger, more diverse, and more decentralized the federal government is, the more of a “fascist shock force” would be required to bring about fundamental change.


Border and Rule: Global Migration, Capitalism, and the Rise of Racist Nationalism by Harsha Walia

anti-communist, Berlin Wall, Bernie Sanders, blood diamonds, borderless world, Boris Johnson, British Empire, California gold rush, clean water, collective bargaining, colonial rule, coronavirus, Covid-19, COVID-19, crack epidemic, dark matter, decarbonisation, deindustrialization, Donald Trump, drone strike, Elon Musk, European colonialism, eurozone crisis, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Food sovereignty, G4S, global pandemic, global supply chain, guest worker program, illegal immigration, immigration reform, income inequality, informal economy, Jeff Bezos, joint-stock company, land reform, late capitalism, mandatory minimum, mass immigration, mass incarceration, means of production, microcredit, Monroe Doctrine, moral panic, Naomi Klein, neoliberal agenda, Occupy movement, oil shale / tar sands, open borders, pension reform, Rana Plaza, Richard Florida, Ronald Reagan, Shoshana Zuboff, special economic zone, Steve Bannon, strikebreaker, structural adjustment programs, surveillance capitalism, trade liberalization, transatlantic slave trade, transcontinental railway, union organizing, upwardly mobile, urban planning, wages for housework, Washington Consensus, women in the workforce

—Subcomandante Galeano, “The Method, the Bibliography, and a Drone Deep in the Mountains of the Mexican Southeast” Networks among the nationalist far right are, perhaps paradoxically, increasingly transnational. Brexit cheerleader Nigel Farage appeared at a Trump rally in 2016, former executive chairperson of Breitbart News Steve Bannon became the cochair of the Republican Hindu Coalition in 2019, President Jair Bolsonaro in Brazil was the guest of honor at India’s Republic Day celebration hosted by Prime Minister Narendra Modi in 2020, and the Christ-church shooter as well as Norwegian killer Anders Breivik both glorified the Bosnian Serb army’s ethnic cleansing of Bosnian Muslims and the creation of the ethnostate Republika Srpska.


pages: 412 words: 115,048

Dangerous Ideas: A Brief History of Censorship in the West, From the Ancients to Fake News by Eric Berkowitz

Albert Einstein, anti-communist, Ayatollah Khomeini, Bonfire of the Vanities, borderless world, British Empire, Chelsea Manning, colonial rule, coronavirus, COVID-19, disinformation, Donald Trump, Edward Snowden, Filter Bubble, Index librorum prohibitorum, Jeff Bezos, Julian Assange, Mark Zuckerberg, microaggression, Mikhail Gorbachev, Minecraft, New Urbanism, pre–internet, QAnon, Ralph Nader, Saturday Night Live, Silicon Valley, source of truth, Steve Bannon, surveillance capitalism, undersea cable, WikiLeaks

Unregulated speech places responsibility on the population “in the hope that . . . such freedom will ultimately produce a more capable citizenry and more perfect polity.”7 This is lofty rhetoric, and it is probably still true. But when “speech” becomes the enemy of free expression—when citizen speakers are reduced to online “users” whose scarce attention is manhandled for profit; when tsunamis of online garbage are weaponized to drown out voices and dilute truth (what Steve Bannon, Donald Trump’s 2016 campaign manager, called “flood[ing] the zone with shit”8); when algorithms decide whose voices are heard or magnified; and when corporations frame their buying of elections and burying of climate change information as free speech—it may be time to rethink some cherished assumptions.


pages: 305 words: 79,303

The Four: How Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google Divided and Conquered the World by Scott Galloway

activist fund / activist shareholder / activist investor, additive manufacturing, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Airbnb, Amazon Web Services, Apple II, autonomous vehicles, barriers to entry, Ben Horowitz, Bernie Sanders, big-box store, Bob Noyce, Brewster Kahle, business intelligence, California gold rush, cloud computing, commoditize, cuban missile crisis, David Brooks, disintermediation, don't be evil, Donald Trump, Elon Musk, follow your passion, future of journalism, future of work, global supply chain, Google Earth, Google Glasses, Google X / Alphabet X, Hacker Conference 1984, Internet Archive, invisible hand, Jeff Bezos, Jony Ive, Khan Academy, longitudinal study, Lyft, Mark Zuckerberg, meta-analysis, Network effects, new economy, obamacare, Oculus Rift, offshore financial centre, passive income, Peter Thiel, profit motive, race to the bottom, RAND corporation, ride hailing / ride sharing, risk tolerance, Robert Mercer, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, self-driving car, sentiment analysis, shareholder value, Silicon Valley, Snapchat, software is eating the world, speech recognition, Stephen Hawking, Steve Ballmer, Steve Bannon, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Stewart Brand, supercomputer in your pocket, Tesla Model S, Tim Cook: Apple, Travis Kalanick, Uber and Lyft, Uber for X, uber lyft, undersea cable, Whole Earth Catalog, winner-take-all economy, working poor, you are the product, young professional

January 28, 2017. https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/how-our-likes-helped-trump-win. 19. Cadwalladr, Carole. “Robert Mercer: The big data billionaire waging war on mainstream media.” Guardian. February 26, 2017. https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2017/feb/26/robert-mercer-breitbart-war-on-media-steve-bannon-donald-trump-nigel-farage. 20. “As many as 48 million Twitter accounts aren’t people, says study.” CNBC. April 12, 2017. http://www.cnbcafrica.com/news/technology/2017/04/10/many-48-million-twitter-accounts-arent-people-says-study/. 21. L2 Analysis of LinkedIn Data. 22. Novet, Jordan.


pages: 297 words: 84,447

The Star Builders: Nuclear Fusion and the Race to Power the Planet by Arthur Turrell

Albert Einstein, Arthur Eddington, autonomous vehicles, Boris Johnson, coronavirus, Covid-19, COVID-19, decarbonisation, Donald Trump, energy security, energy transition, Ernest Rutherford, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Jeff Bezos, Kickstarter, New Journalism, nuclear winter, Peter Thiel, planetary scale, Project Plowshare, Silicon Valley, sovereign wealth fund, statistical model, Stephen Hawking, Steve Bannon, The Rise and Fall of American Growth, Tunguska event

Tirone, “Nuclear Fusion,” Bloomberg (2019), https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/energy/nuclear-fusion/2019/06/20/c6bd5682-938d-11e9-956a-88c291ab5c38_story.html. 13. “PayPal Billionaire Peter Thiel ‘Becoming Key Donald Trump Adviser,’ ” Independent (2017), http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/us-politics/peter-thiel-donald-trump-key-adviser-technology-science-paypal-david-gelertner-steve-bannon-a7600471.html; “Peter Thiel’s Other Hobby Is Nuclear Fusion,” Bloomberg (2016), https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-11-22/peter-thiel-s-other-hobby-is-nuclear-fusion. 14. “The Secretive, Billionaire-Backed Plans to Harness Fusion,” BBC News (2016), https://www.bbc.com/future/article/20160428-the-secretive-billionaire-backed-plans-to-harness-fusion. 15.


pages: 533 words: 125,495

Rationality: What It Is, Why It Seems Scarce, Why It Matters by Steven Pinker

affirmative action, Albert Einstein, autonomous vehicles, availability heuristic, Ayatollah Khomeini, backpropagation, basic income, butterfly effect, Cass Sunstein, choice architecture, clean water, coronavirus, correlation coefficient, correlation does not imply causation, Covid-19, COVID-19, crowdsourcing, cuban missile crisis, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, David Attenborough, delayed gratification, disinformation, Donald Trump, effective altruism, en.wikipedia.org, Erdős number, Estimating the Reproducibility of Psychological Science, feminist movement, framing effect, George Akerlof, germ theory of disease, high batting average, index card, Jeff Bezos, job automation, John Nash: game theory, John von Neumann, libertarian paternalism, longitudinal study, loss aversion, Mahatma Gandhi, meta-analysis, microaggression, Monty Hall problem, Nash equilibrium, New Journalism, Paul Erdős, Paul Samuelson, Peter Singer: altruism, Pierre-Simon Laplace, placebo effect, QAnon, QWERTY keyboard, Ralph Waldo Emerson, randomized controlled trial, replication crisis, Richard Thaler, scientific worldview, selection bias, Stanford marshmallow experiment, Steve Bannon, Steven Pinker, sunk-cost fallacy, the scientific method, Thomas Bayes, Tragedy of the Commons, twin studies, universal basic income, Upton Sinclair, urban planning, Walter Mischel, yellow journalism, zero-sum game

Even before the Trumpian takeover, thoughtful Republican stalwarts had disparaged their own organization as “the party of stupid” for its anti-intellectualism and hostility to science.73 Since then, many others have been horrified by their party’s acquiescence to Trump’s maniacal lying and trolling: his game plan, in the admiring words of onetime strategist Steve Bannon, to “flood the zone with shit.”74 With Trump’s defeat, rational heads on the right should seek to restore American politics to a system with two parties that differ over policy rather than over the existence of facts and truth. We are not helpless against the onslaught of “post-truth” disinformation.


pages: 462 words: 129,022

People, Power, and Profits: Progressive Capitalism for an Age of Discontent by Joseph E. Stiglitz

"Robert Solow", affirmative action, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, barriers to entry, basic income, battle of ideas, Berlin Wall, Bernie Madoff, Bernie Sanders, business cycle, Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty, carried interest, central bank independence, clean water, collective bargaining, corporate governance, corporate social responsibility, creative destruction, Credit Default Swap, crony capitalism, deglobalization, deindustrialization, disinformation, disintermediation, diversified portfolio, Donald Trump, Edward Snowden, Elon Musk, Erik Brynjolfsson, Fall of the Berlin Wall, financial deregulation, financial innovation, financial intermediation, Firefox, Fractional reserve banking, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, full employment, George Akerlof, gig economy, global supply chain, greed is good, income inequality, information asymmetry, invisible hand, Isaac Newton, Jean Tirole, Jeff Bezos, job automation, John Maynard Keynes: Economic Possibilities for our Grandchildren, John von Neumann, Joseph Schumpeter, labor-force participation, late fees, low skilled workers, Mark Zuckerberg, market fundamentalism, mass incarceration, meta-analysis, minimum wage unemployment, moral hazard, new economy, New Urbanism, obamacare, patent troll, Paul Samuelson, pension reform, Peter Thiel, postindustrial economy, price discrimination, principal–agent problem, profit maximization, purchasing power parity, race to the bottom, Ralph Nader, rent-seeking, Richard Thaler, Robert Bork, Robert Gordon, Robert Mercer, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, Ronald Reagan, Savings and loan crisis, secular stagnation, self-driving car, shareholder value, Shoshana Zuboff, Silicon Valley, Simon Kuznets, South China Sea, sovereign wealth fund, speech recognition, Steve Bannon, Steve Jobs, surveillance capitalism, The Chicago School, The Future of Employment, The Great Moderation, the market place, The Rise and Fall of American Growth, the scientific method, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, too big to fail, trade liberalization, transaction costs, trickle-down economics, two-sided market, universal basic income, Unsafe at Any Speed, Upton Sinclair, uranium enrichment, War on Poverty, working-age population, Yochai Benkler

Cigarette companies succeeded in using these methods to cast doubt on scientific findings that smoking was bad for health; and firms of all kinds succeed in persuading individuals to buy products that they might not otherwise have bought, that upon deeper reflection, they neither need nor want. If you can sell bad and even dangerous products, you can sell bad and even dangerous ideas—and there are strong economic interests to do so. These insights were picked up and used with vengeance by Steve Bannon and Fox News to change perceptions on a host of topics, from climate change to the inefficiency and inequities of government. Selling the majority on policies that are against their own interest That Trump and his clique have an interest in subverting the truth is no surprise. But one has to ask, with so much at stake, including our democracy and the advances in standards of living that have marked the past 250 years, why does this concerted attack on the very institutions and ideas that have done so much for our civilization seem to resonate among so many?


pages: 444 words: 127,259

Super Pumped: The Battle for Uber by Mike Isaac

"side hustle", activist fund / activist shareholder / activist investor, Airbnb, Albert Einstein, always be closing, Amazon Web Services, Andy Kessler, autonomous vehicles, Ayatollah Khomeini, barriers to entry, Bay Area Rapid Transit, Burning Man, call centre, Chris Urmson, Chuck Templeton: OpenTable:, citizen journalism, Clayton Christensen, cloud computing, corporate governance, creative destruction, don't be evil, Donald Trump, Elon Musk, family office, gig economy, Google Glasses, Google X / Alphabet X, high net worth, hockey-stick growth, hustle culture, impact investing, Jeff Bezos, John Markoff, Kickstarter, Lyft, Marc Andreessen, Mark Zuckerberg, mass immigration, Menlo Park, Mitch Kapor, money market fund, moral hazard, move fast and break things, move fast and break things, Network effects, new economy, off grid, peer-to-peer, pets.com, Richard Florida, ride hailing / ride sharing, Sand Hill Road, self-driving car, shareholder value, Shenzhen special economic zone , side project, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, skunkworks, Snapchat, software as a service, software is eating the world, South China Sea, South of Market, San Francisco, sovereign wealth fund, special economic zone, Steve Bannon, Steve Jobs, super pumped, TaskRabbit, the payments system, Tim Cook: Apple, Travis Kalanick, Uber and Lyft, Uber for X, uber lyft, ubercab, union organizing, upwardly mobile, WeWork, Y Combinator

The swearing-in ceremony in January was painful to watch. He winced as the group of tycoons and robber barons surrounded Trump at the Capitol, celebrating the triumph of evil over good. The travel ban carried out less than a week later seemed sadistic to him. The cruel execution of the announcement perfectly symbolized Stephen Miller and Steve Bannon—two of Trump’s most xenophobic, nationalistic advisors—and their desire to inflict pain on immigrants. But O’Sullivan felt a glimmer of hope as the news reported crowds of people gathering at the airport to protest Trump’s unjust ban. Thousands of other people like him, fed up with fear and anger, were fighting the administration through protest, one of the most American acts there is.


pages: 504 words: 129,087

The Ones We've Been Waiting For: How a New Generation of Leaders Will Transform America by Charlotte Alter

"side hustle", 4chan, affirmative action, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, basic income, Berlin Wall, Bernie Sanders, carbon footprint, clean water, collective bargaining, Columbine, corporate personhood, correlation does not imply causation, Credit Default Swap, crowdsourcing, David Brooks, disinformation, Donald Trump, double helix, East Village, ending welfare as we know it, Fall of the Berlin Wall, feminist movement, Ferguson, Missouri, financial deregulation, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, gig economy, glass ceiling, Google Hangouts, housing crisis, illegal immigration, immigration reform, income inequality, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), job-hopping, Kevin Kelly, knowledge economy, Lyft, mandatory minimum, Marc Andreessen, Mark Zuckerberg, mass incarceration, McMansion, medical bankruptcy, microaggression, move fast and break things, move fast and break things, Nate Silver, obamacare, Occupy movement, passive income, pre–internet, race to the bottom, RAND corporation, Ronald Reagan, sexual politics, Silicon Valley, single-payer health, Snapchat, Steve Bannon, TaskRabbit, too big to fail, Uber and Lyft, uber lyft, universal basic income, unpaid internship, We are the 99%, white picket fence, working poor, Works Progress Administration

HOUSE DEFEATS GUN CONTROL BILL: The drive for expanded gun controls abruptly collapsed in the House yesterday, raising doubts that Congress will pass any gun measures this year. . . . CHAPTER 2 Harry Potter and the Spawn of the Boomers The baby boomers are the most spoiled, most self-centered, most narcissistic generation the country’s ever produced. —STEVE BANNON Once upon a time in America, a generation of middle-class young people graduated from publicly funded high schools and went to highly subsidized, rapidly diversifying, and increasingly competitive colleges. They outworked their aristocratic classmates and entered a new “knowledge economy” of lawyers, bankers, and lobbyists, where they made hundreds of thousands of dollars a year helping other rich people stay rich.


pages: 326 words: 91,559

Everything for Everyone: The Radical Tradition That Is Shaping the Next Economy by Nathan Schneider

1960s counterculture, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Airbnb, altcoin, Amazon Mechanical Turk, back-to-the-land, basic income, Berlin Wall, Bernie Sanders, bitcoin, blockchain, Brewster Kahle, Burning Man, Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty, carbon footprint, Clayton Christensen, collaborative economy, collective bargaining, Community Supported Agriculture, corporate governance, creative destruction, crowdsourcing, cryptocurrency, Debian, disruptive innovation, do-ocracy, Donald Knuth, Donald Trump, Edward Snowden, Elon Musk, Ethereum, ethereum blockchain, Food sovereignty, four colour theorem, future of work, gig economy, Google bus, hydraulic fracturing, Internet Archive, Jeff Bezos, jimmy wales, joint-stock company, Joseph Schumpeter, Julian Assange, Kickstarter, Lyft, M-Pesa, Marc Andreessen, Mark Zuckerberg, Marshall McLuhan, mass immigration, means of production, Money creation, multi-sided market, new economy, offshore financial centre, old-boy network, Peter H. Diamandis: Planetary Resources, Pier Paolo Pasolini, post-work, precariat, premature optimization, pre–internet, profit motive, race to the bottom, Richard Florida, Richard Stallman, ride hailing / ride sharing, Sam Altman, Satoshi Nakamoto, self-driving car, shareholder value, sharing economy, Silicon Valley, Slavoj Žižek, smart contracts, Steve Bannon, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Stewart Brand, surveillance capitalism, transaction costs, Turing test, Uber and Lyft, uber lyft, underbanked, undersea cable, universal basic income, Upton Sinclair, Vanguard fund, white flight, Whole Earth Catalog, WikiLeaks, women in the workforce, working poor, Y Combinator, Y2K, Zipcar

Austin Startups (June 15, 2017); Anca Voinea, “Corbyn’s Digital Democracy Manifesto Promotes Co-operative Ownership of Digital Platforms,” Co-operative News (August 30, 2016). 27. Lina Khan, “Amazon’s Antitrust Paradox,” Yale Law Journal 126, no. 3 (January 2017); Jonathan Taplin, “Is It Time to Break Up Google?” New York Times (April 22, 2017); Ryan Grim, “Steve Bannon Wants Facebook and Google Regulated Like Utilities,” Intercept (July 27, 2017). 28. David Talbot, Kira Hessekiel, and Danielle Kehl, Community-Owned Fiber Networks: Value Leaders in America (Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society, 2018); for resources on co-op and municipal broadband programs, see muninetworks.org, a project of the Institute for Local Self-Reliance. 29.


pages: 265 words: 93,354

Please Don't Sit on My Bed in Your Outside Clothes: Essays by Phoebe Robinson

Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Airbnb, butterfly effect, coronavirus, Covid-19, COVID-19, David Attenborough, desegregation, different worldview, disinformation, Donald Trump, Downton Abbey, financial independence, gig economy, global pandemic, hiring and firing, independent contractor, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Joan Didion, Lyft, mass incarceration, microaggression, Ralph Waldo Emerson, rolodex, Rosa Parks, Steve Bannon, Steve Jobs, too big to fail, uber lyft, unpaid internship

If avoiding being cussed out is the overarching goal, of course employees are going to toe the line, but, frankly, that sounds miserable for everyone involved. I mean, it’s demoralizing to be on the receiving end of vitriol, and to be the one doling out that awful wrath does nothing but mess up your skin. Seriously, being a tyrant will have you going from Dorian Gray to Steve Bannon in a New York minute. #ShallowButTrue. But leaders, especially the successful ones (note: Success is not limited to amassing wealth; I’m talking interpersonal skills, encouraging their employees to exceed their potential, etc.), are a different breed. Leaders are inspiring, make their employees feel like they’re in the fight with them, and show they care about more than the bottom line, all of which can cause their employees to exude the most coveted yet illusive quality: loyalty.


pages: 404 words: 95,163

Amazon: How the World’s Most Relentless Retailer Will Continue to Revolutionize Commerce by Natalie Berg, Miya Knights

3D printing, Adam Neumann (WeWork), Airbnb, Amazon Web Services, augmented reality, Bernie Sanders, big-box store, business intelligence, cloud computing, Colonization of Mars, commoditize, computer vision, connected car, Donald Trump, Doomsday Clock, Elon Musk, gig economy, independent contractor, Internet of things, inventory management, invisible hand, Jeff Bezos, market fragmentation, new economy, pattern recognition, Ponzi scheme, pre–internet, QR code, race to the bottom, recommendation engine, remote working, sensor fusion, sharing economy, Skype, Steve Bannon, sunk-cost fallacy, supply-chain management, TaskRabbit, trade route, underbanked, urban planning, WeWork, white picket fence

Amazon’s dominance has come at a cost – one that most normal retailers could not bear – and now there are growing calls for existing legislation to be rewritten for the digital age. Trump’s tweets may get all the publicity, but Amazon is now facing bipartisan backlash. On the far right, former Trump advisor Steve Bannon has called for tech giants to be regulated like public utilities since they have become so essential to 21st-century life; while Democratic Party leaders pushed for a wider antitrust crackdown in 2018 as part of their ‘Better Deal’ economic platform. ‘We’re seeing this incredibly large company getting involved in almost every area of commerce and I think it is important to look at the power and influence Amazon has’, said Democratic Senator Bernie Sanders in 2018.3 Khan argues that predatory pricing and vertical integration are highly relevant to analysing Amazon’s path to dominance – and that current doctrine underappreciates the risk of such practices.


pages: 305 words: 101,743

Trick Mirror: Reflections on Self-Delusion by Jia Tolentino

4chan, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Airbnb, Alexander Shulgin, big-box store, cloud computing, crowdsourcing, Donald Trump, financial independence, game design, Jeff Bezos, Kickstarter, knowledge worker, late capitalism, Lyft, Mark Zuckerberg, Mason jar, Norman Mailer, obamacare, pattern recognition, Peter Thiel, Ponzi scheme, prosperity theology / prosperity gospel / gospel of success, QR code, rent control, Saturday Night Live, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), Silicon Valley, Snapchat, Steve Bannon, Steve Jobs, uber lyft, upwardly mobile, wage slave, white picket fence

It’s not out of the realm of possibility—and is in fact quite likely—that Conway has considered that no matter what she says or does…she will be criticized in bluntly sexist terms because she is a woman.” I’d add that she also likely knows that, on the terms of contemporary feminism, she will be defended in equally blunt terms, too. Later on, Jennifer Palmieri, the director of communications for Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign, lamented in the Times that Steve Bannon was seen as an evil genius while Conway, equally manipulative, was just seen as crazy. When Saturday Night Live portrayed Conway like Glenn Close in Fatal Attraction in a sketch, that, too, was sexist, as were the memes that compared Conway to Gollum and Skeletor. But if you stripped away the sexism, you would still be left with Kellyanne Conway.


pages: 336 words: 95,773

The Theft of a Decade: How the Baby Boomers Stole the Millennials' Economic Future by Joseph C. Sternberg

Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Airbnb, American Legislative Exchange Council, Asian financial crisis, banking crisis, Basel III, Bear Stearns, Bernie Sanders, blue-collar work, centre right, corporate raider, Detroit bankruptcy, Donald Trump, Edward Glaeser, employer provided health coverage, Erik Brynjolfsson, eurozone crisis, future of work, gig economy, Gordon Gekko, hiring and firing, Home mortgage interest deduction, housing crisis, independent contractor, job satisfaction, job-hopping, labor-force participation, low skilled workers, Lyft, Marc Andreessen, Mark Zuckerberg, minimum wage unemployment, mortgage debt, mortgage tax deduction, Nate Silver, new economy, obamacare, oil shock, payday loans, pension reform, quantitative easing, Richard Florida, Ronald Reagan, Saturday Night Live, Second Machine Age, sharing economy, Silicon Valley, sovereign wealth fund, Steve Bannon, TaskRabbit, total factor productivity, Tyler Cowen: Great Stagnation, uber lyft, unpaid internship, women in the workforce

Paul Taylor, The Next America: Boomers, Millennials, and the Looming Generational Showdown (New York: PublicAffairs, 2017), 22. 13. William Strauss and Neil Howe, Generations: The History of America’s Future, 1584–2069 (New York: William Morrow, 1991). 14. Ibid., 419. 15. Tim Fernholz, “The Pseudoscience That Prepared America for Steve Bannon’s Apocalyptic Message,” Quartz, May 27, 2017. 16. Richard Fry, “Millennials Projected to Overtake Baby Boomers as America’s Largest Generation,” Fact Tank (blog), Pew Research Center, March 1, 2018. 17. Ibid. 18. William H. Frey, “The Millennial Generation: A Demographic Bridge to America’s Diverse Future,” Metropolitan Policy Program, Brookings, January 2018, brookings.edu/research/millennials. 19.


pages: 370 words: 99,312

Can Democracy Work?: A Short History of a Radical Idea, From Ancient Athens to Our World by James Miller

Berlin Wall, Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty, Cass Sunstein, colonial rule, cuban missile crisis, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, David Graeber, disinformation, Donald Trump, failed state, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, income inequality, Joseph Schumpeter, mass incarceration, means of production, Occupy movement, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Republic of Letters, Steve Bannon, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, The Wisdom of Crowds, transatlantic slave trade, union organizing, upwardly mobile, Vilfredo Pareto

Trump, acceptance speech at the Republican National Convention, July 21, 2016, www.politico.com/story/2016/07/full-transcript-donald-trump-nomination-acceptance-speech-at-rnc-225974. “This is what democracy looks like!”: Anemona Hartocollis and Yamiche Alcindor, “Women’s March Highlights as Huge Crowds Protest Trump: ‘We’re Not Going Away,’” The New York Times, January 21, 2017, www.nytimes.com/2017/01/21/us/womens-march.html?mcubz=1. “Who was sovereign?”: Steve Bannon, speaking at the victory party for Roy Moore, a white nationalist candidate in the Alabama Republican Senate Primary, on September 28, 2017. Alex Isenstadt, “Moore’s win spells trouble for GOP establishment in 2018: The insurgent’s victory in Alabama is likely to fuel other primary challenges in a year that was supposed to be kind to the GOP,” Politico, September 27, 2017, www.politico.com/story/2017/09/27/alabama-republicans-moore-midterms-strange-243188.


pages: 579 words: 160,351

Breaking News: The Remaking of Journalism and Why It Matters Now by Alan Rusbridger

accounting loophole / creative accounting, Airbnb, Andy Carvin, banking crisis, Bernie Sanders, Boris Johnson, centre right, Chelsea Manning, citizen journalism, cross-subsidies, crowdsourcing, David Attenborough, David Brooks, death of newspapers, Donald Trump, Doomsday Book, Double Irish / Dutch Sandwich, Downton Abbey, Edward Snowden, Etonian, Filter Bubble, forensic accounting, Frank Gehry, future of journalism, G4S, high net worth, invention of movable type, invention of the printing press, Jeff Bezos, jimmy wales, Julian Assange, Mark Zuckerberg, Menlo Park, natural language processing, New Journalism, offshore financial centre, oil shale / tar sands, open borders, packet switching, Panopticon Jeremy Bentham, pre–internet, ransomware, recommendation engine, Ruby on Rails, sexual politics, Silicon Valley, Skype, Snapchat, social web, Socratic dialogue, sovereign wealth fund, speech recognition, Steve Bannon, Steve Jobs, The Wisdom of Crowds, Tim Cook: Apple, traveling salesman, upwardly mobile, WikiLeaks, Yochai Benkler

The UK Independence Party (UKIP), a right-wing populist party that successfully campaigned for Britain to leave the European Union. 12. Independent, 21 February 2017 13. Twitter, 17 December 2017, 12.25 p.m.; @PeterSweden7 14. Twitter, 7 August 2016, 8.44 a.m.; @PeterSweden7 15. Twitter, 14 October 2016, 3.21 a.m.; @PeterSweden7 16. petersweden.com 17. Zack Beauchamp, on Vox, noted how Steve Bannon’s website had published an ‘enormous number of pieces’ about the alleged migrant rape crisis in Sweden. 18. Sydsvenska, 20 December 2017 19. The Local, 13 February 2018 20. BBC, Reality Check, 24 February 2017 21. Not all billionaires were the same. The new publisher of the New York Times, A.G.


How to Be a Liberal: The Story of Liberalism and the Fight for Its Life by Ian Dunt

4chan, Alfred Russel Wallace, bank run, battle of ideas, Bear Stearns, Big bang: deregulation of the City of London, Boris Johnson, bounce rate, British Empire, Brixton riot, Carmen Reinhart, centre right, David Ricardo: comparative advantage, disinformation, Dominic Cummings, Donald Trump, eurozone crisis, experimental subject, feminist movement, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, full employment, Growth in a Time of Debt, illegal immigration, invisible hand, John Bercow, Kenneth Rogoff, liberal world order, Mark Zuckerberg, mass immigration, means of production, Mohammed Bouazizi, Northern Rock, old-boy network, Paul Samuelson, Peter Thiel, price mechanism, profit motive, quantitative easing, recommendation engine, road to serfdom, Ronald Reagan, Saturday Night Live, Scientific racism, Silicon Valley, Steve Bannon, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, too big to fail, upwardly mobile, Winter of Discontent, working poor, zero-sum game

In 2013, Trump made a speech to the Republicans at the Conservative Political Action Conference in Washington, in which he outlined the themes that would go on to define him – the threat of a rising China, the possibility of 11 million ‘illegals’ being able to vote, and a decline in manufacturing. ‘You’re on a suicide mission,’ he told the delegates. ‘Our country is a total mess – a total and complete mess – and what we need is leadership.’ In the audience was Steve Bannon, the executive chairman of the white nationalist website Breitbart. Bannon liked what he saw in Trump and in particular the unquestioning adulation he could produce in many voters. He reported the speech back to two men who would be crucial in allowing Trump to deliver on his agenda. The first was Jeff Sessions, a Republican senator from Alabama, who had been fighting a battle against immigration for years.


pages: 380 words: 109,724

Don't Be Evil: How Big Tech Betrayed Its Founding Principles--And All of US by Rana Foroohar

"side hustle", accounting loophole / creative accounting, Airbnb, algorithmic bias, AltaVista, autonomous vehicles, banking crisis, barriers to entry, Bernie Madoff, Bernie Sanders, bitcoin, book scanning, Brewster Kahle, Burning Man, call centre, cashless society, cleantech, cloud computing, cognitive dissonance, Colonization of Mars, computer age, corporate governance, creative destruction, Credit Default Swap, cryptocurrency, data is the new oil, death of newspapers, Deng Xiaoping, disinformation, disintermediation, don't be evil, Donald Trump, drone strike, Edward Snowden, Elon Musk, en.wikipedia.org, Erik Brynjolfsson, Etonian, Filter Bubble, future of work, game design, gig economy, global supply chain, Gordon Gekko, greed is good, income inequality, independent contractor, informal economy, information asymmetry, intangible asset, Internet Archive, Internet of things, invisible hand, Jaron Lanier, Jeff Bezos, job automation, job satisfaction, Kenneth Rogoff, life extension, light touch regulation, Lyft, Mark Zuckerberg, Marshall McLuhan, Martin Wolf, Menlo Park, move fast and break things, move fast and break things, Network effects, new economy, offshore financial centre, PageRank, patent troll, paypal mafia, Peter Thiel, pets.com, price discrimination, profit maximization, race to the bottom, recommendation engine, ride hailing / ride sharing, Robert Bork, Sand Hill Road, search engine result page, self-driving car, shareholder value, sharing economy, Shoshana Zuboff, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, smart cities, Snapchat, South China Sea, sovereign wealth fund, Steve Bannon, Steve Jobs, Steven Levy, subscription business, supply-chain management, surveillance capitalism, TaskRabbit, Telecommunications Act of 1996, The Chicago School, the new new thing, Tim Cook: Apple, too big to fail, Travis Kalanick, trickle-down economics, Uber and Lyft, Uber for X, uber lyft, Upton Sinclair, WeWork, WikiLeaks, zero-sum game

But the dirty politics of the Trump campaign, coupled with the vast trove of data that could be harvested from Facebook and a variety of other websites and apps, led to something much darker.5 According to a report published in Bloomberg Businessweek that came out a full two weeks before the election, Trump knew he needed a miracle to win, and his campaign team, led by the infamous Steve Bannon; Trump’s son-in-law, Jared Kushner; and other social media–savvy staffers, found that “miracle” in Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube.6 Kushner, who had friends in the tech world, reached out to “some Silicon Valley people who are kind of covert Trump fans and experts in digital marketing.”


pages: 918 words: 257,605

The Age of Surveillance Capitalism by Shoshana Zuboff

algorithmic bias, Amazon Web Services, Andrew Keen, augmented reality, autonomous vehicles, barriers to entry, Bartolomé de las Casas, Berlin Wall, bitcoin, blockchain, blue-collar work, book scanning, Broken windows theory, California gold rush, call centre, Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty, Cass Sunstein, choice architecture, citizen journalism, cloud computing, collective bargaining, Computer Numeric Control, computer vision, connected car, corporate governance, corporate personhood, creative destruction, cryptocurrency, disinformation, dogs of the Dow, don't be evil, Donald Trump, Edward Snowden, en.wikipedia.org, Erik Brynjolfsson, facts on the ground, Ford paid five dollars a day, future of work, game design, Google Earth, Google Glasses, Google X / Alphabet X, hive mind, Ian Bogost, impulse control, income inequality, Internet of things, invention of the printing press, invisible hand, Jean Tirole, job automation, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, John Markoff, John Maynard Keynes: Economic Possibilities for our Grandchildren, John Maynard Keynes: technological unemployment, Joseph Schumpeter, Kevin Kelly, knowledge economy, linked data, longitudinal study, low skilled workers, Mark Zuckerberg, market bubble, means of production, multi-sided market, Naomi Klein, natural language processing, Network effects, new economy, Occupy movement, off grid, PageRank, Panopticon Jeremy Bentham, pattern recognition, Paul Buchheit, performance metric, Philip Mirowski, precision agriculture, price mechanism, profit maximization, profit motive, recommendation engine, refrigerator car, RFID, Richard Thaler, ride hailing / ride sharing, Robert Bork, Robert Mercer, Second Machine Age, self-driving car, sentiment analysis, shareholder value, Shoshana Zuboff, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley ideology, Silicon Valley startup, slashdot, smart cities, Snapchat, social graph, social web, software as a service, speech recognition, statistical model, Steve Bannon, Steve Jobs, Steven Levy, structural adjustment programs, surveillance capitalism, The Future of Employment, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Tim Cook: Apple, two-sided market, union organizing, Watson beat the top human players on Jeopardy!, winner-take-all economy, Wolfgang Streeck, Yochai Benkler, you are the product

“Introducing FBLearner Flow: Facebook’s AI Backbone,” Facebook Code, April 16, 2018, https://code.facebook.com/posts/1072626246134461/introducing-fblearner-flow-facebook-s-ai-backbone. 79. Andy Kroll, “Cloak and Data: The Real Story Behind Cambridge Analytica’s Rise and Fall,” Mother Jones, March 24, 2018, https://www.motherjones.com/politics/2018/03/cloak-and-data-cambridge-analytica-robert-mercer. 80. Carole Cadwalladr, “‘I Made Steve Bannon’s Psychological Warfare Tool’: Meet the Data War Whistleblower,” Guardian, March 18, 2018, http://www.the guardian.com/news/2018/mar/17/data-war-whistleblower-christopher-wylie-faceook-nix-bannon-trump; Kroll, “Cloak and Data.” 81. Matthew Rosenberg, Nicholas Confessore, and Carole Cadwalladr, “How Trump Consultants Exploited the Facebook Data of Millions,” New York Times, March 17, 2018, https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/17/us/politics/cambridge-analytica-trump-campaign.html; Emma Graham-Harrison and Carole Cadwalladr, “Revealed: 50 Million Facebook Profiles Harvested for Cambridge Analytica in Major Data Breach,” Guardian, March 17, 2018, http://www.theguardian.com/news/2018/mar/17/cambridge-analytica-facebook-influence-us-election; Julia Carrie Wong and Paul Lewis, “Facebook Gave Data About 57bn Friendships to Academic,” Guardian, March 22, 2018, http://www.theguardian.com/news/2018/mar/22/facebook-gave-data-about-57bn-friendships-to-academic-aleksandr-kogan; Olivia Solon, “Facebook Says Cambridge Analytica May Have Gained 37m More Users’ Data,” Guardian, April 4, 2018, http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2018/apr/04/facebook-cambridge-analytica-user-data-latest-more-than-thought. 82.

Kroll, “Cloak and Data.” 84. Frederik Zuiderveen Borgesius et al., “Online Political Microtargeting: Promises and Threats for Democracy” (SSRN Scholarly Paper, Rochester, NY: Social Science Research Network, February 9, 2018), https://papers.ssrn.com/abstract=3128787. 85. See Cadwalladr, “‘I Made Steve Bannon’s Psychological Warfare Tool.’” 86. Charlotte McEleny, “European Commission Issues €3.6m Grant for Tech That Measures Content ‘Likeability,’” CampaignLive.co.uk, April 20, 2015, http://www.campaignlive.co.uk/article/european-commission-issues-€36m-grant-tech-measures-content-likeability/1343366. 87. “2016 Innovation Radar Prize Winners,” Digital Single Market, September 26, 2016, https://ec.europa.eu/digital-single-market/en/news/2016-innovation-radar-prize-winners. 88.


pages: 349 words: 114,914

We Were Eight Years in Power: An American Tragedy by Ta-Nehisi Coates

affirmative action, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Bernie Madoff, Bernie Sanders, Broken windows theory, Charles Lindbergh, crack epidemic, crony capitalism, David Brooks, deindustrialization, desegregation, Donald Trump, fear of failure, Ferguson, Missouri, Gunnar Myrdal, housing crisis, Howard Zinn, income inequality, jitney, low skilled workers, mandatory minimum, mass incarceration, moral panic, new economy, obamacare, payday loans, phenotype, Ronald Reagan, Rosa Parks, San Francisco homelessness, single-payer health, Steve Bannon, The Bell Curve by Richard Herrnstein and Charles Murray, War on Poverty, white flight

It is often said that Trump has no real ideology, which is not true—his ideology is white supremacy in all of its truculent and sanctimonious power. Trump inaugurated his campaign by casting himself as the defender of white maidenhood against Mexican “rapists,” only to be later revealed as a proud violator. White supremacy has always had a perverse sexual tint. It is thus appropriate that Trump’s rise was shepherded by Steve Bannon, a man who mocks his white male opponents as “cucks.” The word, derived from cuckold, is specifically meant to debase by fear/fantasy—the target is so weak that he would submit to the humiliation of having his white wife lie with black men. That the slur cuck casts white men as victims aligns with the dictums of whiteness, which seek to alchemize one’s profligate sins into virtue.


pages: 394 words: 117,982

The Perfect Weapon: War, Sabotage, and Fear in the Cyber Age by David E. Sanger

active measures, autonomous vehicles, Bernie Sanders, bitcoin, British Empire, call centre, Cass Sunstein, Chelsea Manning, computer age, cryptocurrency, cuban missile crisis, disinformation, Donald Trump, drone strike, Edward Snowden, Google Chrome, Google Earth, Jacob Appelbaum, John Markoff, Mark Zuckerberg, MITM: man-in-the-middle, mutually assured destruction, RAND corporation, ransomware, Sand Hill Road, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley ideology, Skype, South China Sea, Steve Bannon, Steve Jobs, Steven Levy, Stuxnet, Tim Cook: Apple, too big to fail, undersea cable, uranium enrichment, Valery Gerasimov, WikiLeaks, zero day

The publication of the DNC material seemed highly coordinated. Russian propaganda was in overdrive; while no one yet understood the extent of the problem, there were reports of fictitious news stories about Clinton’s health, which usually were stuck in an echo chamber, bouncing between the Russian TV network RT and Breitbart News, Steve Bannon’s mouthpiece. “I didn’t realize at the time that two-thirds of American adults get their news through social media,” said Haines, who was among the most thoughtful members of Obama’s team about the impact of social movements on democratic processes. “So while we knew something about Russian efforts to manipulate social media, I think it is fair to say that we did not recognize the extent of the vulnerability.”


On the Road: Adventures From Nixon to Trump by James Naughtie

Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Alistair Cooke, anti-communist, Ayatollah Khomeini, Bear Stearns, Berlin Wall, Bernie Sanders, centre right, collapse of Lehman Brothers, Donald Trump, Ferguson, Missouri, Haight Ashbury, illegal immigration, immigration reform, Julian Assange, Mikhail Gorbachev, Norman Mailer, obamacare, Plutocrats, plutocrats, post-work, Ronald Reagan, Ronald Reagan: Tear down this wall, Seymour Hersh, South China Sea, Steve Bannon, trickle-down economics, white flight, WikiLeaks, Yom Kippur War, young professional, zero-sum game

There had been little notice, but a large crowd turned up, probably 10,000 strong, who waited in the sunshine for the first sight of his plane – with trump emblazoned on the fuselage, of course. They were a cross-section of the local community, ordinary people with kids perched on their shoulders eating ice creams. There were a few hairy bikers who seemed to be from the Steve Bannon part of Trumpland – some white nationalist stickers were on their machines – but in the main this was middle America at play, not even particularly concerned about chanting ‘Lock her up!’ too often. They were normality on display. My Today colleague Jonathan Harvey said, as the plane appeared, ‘He’s going to win, you know.’


pages: 391 words: 112,312

The Plague Year: America in the Time of Covid by Lawrence Wright

Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Bernie Sanders, blockchain, business cycle, coronavirus, Covid-19, COVID-19, cryptocurrency, Donald Trump, full employment, global pandemic, income inequality, jimmy wales, Kickstarter, Louis Pasteur, meta-analysis, mouse model, Nate Silver, Plutocrats, plutocrats, QAnon, RAND corporation, road to serfdom, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, Steve Bannon, the scientific method, transcontinental railway

The invitation came as a result of a memo Pottinger had written about U.S. relations with Asia. He rode a Citibike to the glassy skyscraper on Fifth Avenue. Secret Service had cut off elevator access to the Trump quarters, so Pottinger walked up the remaining stairs, feeling a little disoriented. He emerged in an opulent apartment, slathered in blinding gilt. Steve Bannon, Trump’s political guru, was there, along with Flynn. Jared Kushner wandered in with K.T. McFarland, who would serve briefly as deputy national security adviser, the position Pottinger would eventually hold. There were several other people Pottinger didn’t know, none of whom had anything to do with Asia.


pages: 756 words: 120,818

The Levelling: What’s Next After Globalization by Michael O’sullivan

"Robert Solow", 3D printing, Airbnb, algorithmic trading, bank run, banking crisis, barriers to entry, Bernie Sanders, bitcoin, Black Swan, blockchain, bond market vigilante , Boris Johnson, Branko Milanovic, Bretton Woods, British Empire, business cycle, business process, capital controls, Celtic Tiger, central bank independence, cloud computing, continuation of politics by other means, corporate governance, credit crunch, cryptocurrency, deglobalization, deindustrialization, disinformation, disruptive innovation, distributed ledger, Donald Trump, eurozone crisis, financial innovation, first-past-the-post, fixed income, Geoffrey West, Santa Fe Institute, Gini coefficient, global value chain, housing crisis, impact investing, income inequality, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), James Carville said: "I would like to be reincarnated as the bond market. You can intimidate everybody.", knowledge economy, liberal world order, Long Term Capital Management, longitudinal study, market bubble, minimum wage unemployment, new economy, Northern Rock, offshore financial centre, open economy, pattern recognition, Peace of Westphalia, performance metric, private military company, quantitative easing, race to the bottom, reserve currency, Robert Gordon, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, Ronald Reagan, Scramble for Africa, secular stagnation, Silicon Valley, Sinatra Doctrine, South China Sea, South Sea Bubble, special drawing rights, Steve Bannon, supply-chain management, The inhabitant of London could order by telephone, sipping his morning tea in bed, the various products of the whole earth, The Rise and Fall of American Growth, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thomas Kuhn: the structure of scientific revolutions, total factor productivity, trade liberalization, tulip mania, Valery Gerasimov, Washington Consensus

There are several reasons for this; mainstream parties on the right have in general not managed to boost economic growth, and those on the left are politically vulnerable to new trends such as terrorism and immigration. The new trend in politics will be the rise of new parties. Some of these parties may base their manifestos on cross-border appeal (e.g., green parties or Steve Bannon’s Movement, which seeks to connect far-right groups in the United States and Europe). New parties may begin small, but some of those small parties will become mainstream parties, and they may be built up on principles and issues that existing parties do not address well. For instance, many existing parties eschew the role of religion in public life, few of them can craft and communicate a sense of homeland, or heimat, without seeming right wing, others struggle with how to frame the role of technology in societies and economies, and most have failed to address fault lines in public health provision.


pages: 431 words: 129,071

Selfie: How We Became So Self-Obsessed and What It's Doing to Us by Will Storr

Albert Einstein, autonomous vehicles, banking crisis, bitcoin, computer age, correlation does not imply causation, Donald Trump, Douglas Engelbart, Douglas Engelbart, Elon Musk, en.wikipedia.org, gig economy, greed is good, invisible hand, job automation, John Markoff, Kickstarter, longitudinal study, Lyft, Menlo Park, meta-analysis, Mont Pelerin Society, mortgage debt, Mother of all demos, Nixon shock, Peter Thiel, prosperity theology / prosperity gospel / gospel of success, QWERTY keyboard, rising living standards, road to serfdom, Robert Gordon, Ronald Reagan, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, Steve Bannon, Steve Jobs, Steven Levy, Stewart Brand, The Future of Employment, The Rise and Fall of American Growth, Tim Cook: Apple, Travis Kalanick, twin studies, Uber and Lyft, uber lyft, War on Poverty, Whole Earth Catalog

Cramer (University of Chicago Press, 2016), p. 3. Trump said he’d ‘put America first’: Trump said: ‘America first will be the overriding theme of my administration.’ ‘Donald Trump’s foreign policy: “America first”’, Jeremy Diamond and Stephen Colinson, CNN, 27 April 2016. one of his closest advisers complained to reporters: ‘Ringside With Steve Bannon at Trump Tower as the President-Elect’s Strategist Plots “An Entirely New Political Movement”’, Michael Wolff, Hollywood Reporter, 18 November 2016. I’M NOT “DEPLORABLE” I’M JUST A HARD WORKING: Spotted at: https://digest.bps.org.uk/­2016/­11/14/­we-have-an-unfortunate-tendency-to-assume-were-morally-superior-to-others/.


pages: 475 words: 134,707

The Hype Machine: How Social Media Disrupts Our Elections, Our Economy, and Our Health--And How We Must Adapt by Sinan Aral

Airbnb, Albert Einstein, algorithmic bias, Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic, augmented reality, Bernie Sanders, bitcoin, carbon footprint, Cass Sunstein, computer vision, coronavirus, correlation does not imply causation, Covid-19, COVID-19, crowdsourcing, cryptocurrency, death of newspapers, disinformation, disintermediation, Donald Trump, Drosophila, Edward Snowden, Elon Musk, en.wikipedia.org, Erik Brynjolfsson, experimental subject, facts on the ground, Filter Bubble, global pandemic, hive mind, illegal immigration, income inequality, Kickstarter, knowledge worker, longitudinal study, low skilled workers, Lyft, Mahatma Gandhi, Mark Zuckerberg, Menlo Park, meta-analysis, Metcalfe’s law, mobile money, move fast and break things, move fast and break things, multi-sided market, Nate Silver, natural language processing, Network effects, performance metric, phenotype, recommendation engine, Robert Bork, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, Second Machine Age, sentiment analysis, shareholder value, skunkworks, Snapchat, social graph, social intelligence, social software, social web, statistical model, stem cell, Stephen Hawking, Steve Bannon, Steve Jobs, surveillance capitalism, Telecommunications Act of 1996, The Chicago School, the strength of weak ties, The Wisdom of Crowds, theory of mind, Tim Cook: Apple, Uber and Lyft, uber lyft, WikiLeaks, Yogi Berra

“we all know well who created”: Sergey Lavrov, Russian foreign minister, speech during the high-level segment of the twenty-fifth session of the UN Human Rights Council, Geneva, March 3, 2014, https://www.mid.ru/​en/​web/​guest/​vistupleniya_ministra/​-/asset_publisher/​MCZ7HQuMdqBY/​content/​id/​72642. 77 percent of Crimeans report Russian: State Statistics Committee of Ukraine, 2001 Census, http://2001.ukrcensus.gov.ua/​eng/​results/. A more recent Crimean census, conducted by Russia in 2014 after the annexation, is disputed. Cambridge Analytica controversy: Carole Cadwalladr, “ ‘I Made Steve Bannon’s Psychological Warfare Tool’: Meet the Data War Whistleblower,” Guardian, March 18, 2018. Mark Zuckerberg to testify: Mark Zuckerberg, chairman and chief executive officer of Facebook, testimony at hearing before the U.S. Senate Committee on the Judiciary and Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, April 10, 2018, https://en.wikisource.org/​wiki/​Zuckerberg_Senate_Transcript_2018; Mark Zuckerberg, testimony at hearing before the U.S.


pages: 470 words: 148,444

The World as It Is: A Memoir of the Obama White House by Ben Rhodes

Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, agricultural Revolution, Berlin Wall, Bernie Sanders, Boris Johnson, British Empire, centre right, cuban missile crisis, David Brooks, demand response, different worldview, disinformation, Dissolution of the Soviet Union, Donald Trump, drone strike, Edward Snowden, eurozone crisis, F. W. de Klerk, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Ferguson, Missouri, illegal immigration, intangible asset, Mahatma Gandhi, Mohammed Bouazizi, Nelson Mandela, Ronald Reagan, Ronald Reagan: Tear down this wall, Silicon Valley, Skype, South China Sea, Steve Bannon, trickle-down economics, uranium enrichment, WikiLeaks

They ate and talked for three hours, the longest time Obama had spent alone with a foreign leader in eight years. A few of us dined with her staff in an adjoining room. The Germans looked stricken; they spoke with unease about the new world coming, and the burdens on Merkel within it. “To the leader of the free world,” I toasted, ruefully. One aide told me that Steve Bannon’s appointment to the White House staff had been front-page news in Germany. “We know Bannon,” he said, leaning toward me as if passing on a secret in confidence. Outside the window you could see the Brandenburg Gate in a gold light, and the Reichstag building, the replacement for the one that was set on fire as Hitler took power.


We Are the Nerds: The Birth and Tumultuous Life of Reddit, the Internet's Culture Laboratory by Christine Lagorio-Chafkin

4chan, Airbnb, Amazon Web Services, Bernie Sanders, big-box store, bitcoin, blockchain, Brewster Kahle, Burning Man, compensation consultant, crowdsourcing, cryptocurrency, David Heinemeier Hansson, disinformation, Donald Trump, East Village, game design, Golden Gate Park, hiring and firing, independent contractor, Internet Archive, Jacob Appelbaum, Jeff Bezos, jimmy wales, Joi Ito, Justin.tv, Kickstarter, Lean Startup, Lyft, Marc Andreessen, Mark Zuckerberg, medical residency, minimum viable product, natural language processing, Paul Buchheit, Paul Graham, paypal mafia, Peter Thiel, Plutocrats, plutocrats, QR code, recommendation engine, RFID, rolodex, Ruby on Rails, Sam Altman, Sand Hill Road, Saturday Night Live, self-driving car, semantic web, side project, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley ideology, Silicon Valley startup, slashdot, Snapchat, social web, South of Market, San Francisco, Startup school, Stephen Hawking, Steve Bannon, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, technoutopianism, uber lyft, web application, WeWork, WikiLeaks, Y Combinator

., “You Can’t Stay Here: The Efficacy of Reddit’s 2015 Ban Examined Through Hate Speech,” (Proceedings of the ACM on Human-Computer Interaction vol.1) November 2017. A later semantic analysis: Trevor Martin, “Dissecting Trump’s Most Rabid Online Following,” FiveThirtyEight.com, March 23, 2017. alt-right synergy: Joshua Green, Devil’s Bargain: Steve Bannon, Donald Trump, and the Storming of the Presidency (New York: Penguin, 2017). messages were honed here: Savvas Zannettou et al., “The Web Centipede: Understanding How Web Communities Influence Each Other Through the Lens of Mainstream and Alternative News Sources,” September 30, 2017. Former campaign staffers have admitted: Ben Schreckinger, “World War Meme,” Politico Magazine, March/April 2017.


pages: 767 words: 208,933

Liberalism at Large: The World According to the Economist by Alex Zevin

activist fund / activist shareholder / activist investor, affirmative action, anti-communist, Asian financial crisis, bank run, Berlin Wall, Big bang: deregulation of the City of London, Bretton Woods, British Empire, business climate, business cycle, capital controls, centre right, Chelsea Manning, collective bargaining, Columbine, Corn Laws, corporate governance, corporate social responsibility, creative destruction, credit crunch, David Ricardo: comparative advantage, debt deflation, desegregation, disinformation, disruptive innovation, Donald Trump, Edward Snowden, failed state, Fall of the Berlin Wall, financial deregulation, financial innovation, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, full employment, Gini coefficient, global supply chain, hiring and firing, imperial preference, income inequality, interest rate derivative, invisible hand, John von Neumann, Joseph Schumpeter, Julian Assange, Khartoum Gordon, land reform, liberal capitalism, liberal world order, light touch regulation, Long Term Capital Management, market bubble, Martin Wolf, means of production, Mikhail Gorbachev, Monroe Doctrine, Mont Pelerin Society, moral hazard, Naomi Klein, new economy, New Journalism, Nixon triggered the end of the Bretton Woods system, Norman Macrae, Northern Rock, Occupy movement, Philip Mirowski, Plutocrats, plutocrats, price stability, quantitative easing, race to the bottom, railway mania, rent control, rent-seeking, road to serfdom, Ronald Reagan, Rosa Parks, Seymour Hersh, Snapchat, Socratic dialogue, Steve Bannon, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thomas Malthus, too big to fail, trade liberalization, trade route, unbanked and underbanked, underbanked, unorthodox policies, upwardly mobile, War on Poverty, WikiLeaks, Winter of Discontent, Yom Kippur War, young professional

He has so annoyed the other guests, expatiating on everything from how ‘to handle the difficulties of French reoccupation of the Ruhr, especially in relation to the general question of the shortage of pig-iron on the world market’ to ‘professional boxing’, his host tells him to shut up: ‘Farebrother, you are talking through your hat.’8 Buyers usually do more than walk around with their copies, in other words: whether he or she is the leader of the free world, a business magnate, college freshman or, apparently, Sarah Palin and Steve Bannon – they also read it. Investigative journalism is not a strength of the paper. What readers expect from the Economist are sharp didactic summaries and surprising numbers, which it provides on a grand scale. In a single issue, one may flit past e-commerce in China, mortgage fallout in Las Vegas, peace negotiations in the Middle East, the search for life on Mars, a new art museum in Qatar, and an obituary for an obscure South African explorer eaten by a crocodile.


pages: 614 words: 174,226

The Economists' Hour: How the False Prophets of Free Markets Fractured Our Society by Binyamin Appelbaum

"Robert Solow", airline deregulation, Alvin Roth, Andrei Shleifer, anti-communist, battle of ideas, Benoit Mandelbrot, Big bang: deregulation of the City of London, Bretton Woods, British Empire, business cycle, capital controls, Carmen Reinhart, Cass Sunstein, Celtic Tiger, central bank independence, clean water, collective bargaining, Corn Laws, correlation does not imply causation, Credit Default Swap, currency manipulation / currency intervention, David Ricardo: comparative advantage, deindustrialization, Deng Xiaoping, desegregation, Diane Coyle, Donald Trump, ending welfare as we know it, financial deregulation, financial innovation, fixed income, floating exchange rates, full employment, George Akerlof, George Gilder, Gini coefficient, greed is good, Growth in a Time of Debt, Ida Tarbell, income inequality, income per capita, index fund, inflation targeting, invisible hand, Isaac Newton, Jean Tirole, John Markoff, Kenneth Arrow, Kenneth Rogoff, land reform, Long Term Capital Management, low cost airline, manufacturing employment, means of production, Menlo Park, minimum wage unemployment, Mohammed Bouazizi, money market fund, Mont Pelerin Society, Network effects, new economy, Nixon triggered the end of the Bretton Woods system, oil shock, Paul Samuelson, Philip Mirowski, Plutocrats, plutocrats, price stability, profit motive, Ralph Nader, RAND corporation, rent control, rent-seeking, Richard Thaler, road to serfdom, Robert Bork, Robert Gordon, Ronald Coase, Ronald Reagan, Sam Peltzman, Savings and loan crisis, Silicon Valley, Simon Kuznets, starchitect, Steve Bannon, Steve Jobs, supply-chain management, The Chicago School, The Great Moderation, The Myth of the Rational Market, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thomas Kuhn: the structure of scientific revolutions, transaction costs, trickle-down economics, ultimatum game, Unsafe at Any Speed, urban renewal, War on Poverty, Washington Consensus

A study looking specifically at the rise of Hungary’s far-right Jobbik Party since the 2008 crisis found support increased most sharply among Hungarians who borrowed in foreign currencies, and then faced much higher loan payments as the Hungarian currency crashed. 21. Michael Wolff, “Ringside with Steve Bannon at Trump Tower as the President-Elect’s Strategist Plots ‘An Entirely New Political Movement,’ ” Hollywood Reporter, November 18, 2016. 22. The data is from the Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis, which keeps some of the best data on global trade flows. The Dutch have long taken trade very seriously. 23.


Cultural Backlash: Trump, Brexit, and Authoritarian Populism by Pippa Norris, Ronald Inglehart

affirmative action, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, bank run, banking crisis, Berlin Wall, Bernie Sanders, Boris Johnson, Cass Sunstein, centre right, cognitive dissonance, conceptual framework, declining real wages, desegregation, Donald Trump, eurozone crisis, Fall of the Berlin Wall, feminist movement, first-past-the-post, illegal immigration, immigration reform, income inequality, job automation, knowledge economy, labor-force participation, land reform, liberal world order, longitudinal study, low skilled workers, mass immigration, meta-analysis, obamacare, open borders, open economy, post-industrial society, post-materialism, precariat, purchasing power parity, rising living standards, Ronald Reagan, sexual politics, Silicon Valley, statistical model, stem cell, Steve Bannon, War on Poverty, white flight, winner-take-all economy, women in the workforce, working-age population, World Values Survey, zero-sum game

Party platforms and manifestos are taken to reflect common principles as blueprints which guide party campaigns and subsequent government programs.14 But these documents may be inadequate guides to collective issue preferences in factionalized and poorly institutionalized political parties with low party discipline, which are common outside of Western Europe. The US Republican Party, for example, has become more authoritarian populist under the Trump administration, exemplified by the influence of Steve Bannon as chief strategist in the White House during the first seven months after Trump took office, the resignation of many moderate Republican House lawmakers in the run up to the 2018 mid-­term contests, and the role of cabinet members in zealously implementing Trump’s vision of America, notably Scott Pruitt’s tenure in the Environmental Protection Agency and Ryan Zinke at the Interior.