G4S

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pages: 464 words: 121,983

Disaster Capitalism: Making a Killing Out of Catastrophe by Antony Loewenstein

activist fund / activist shareholder / activist investor, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, American Legislative Exchange Council, anti-communist, Asian financial crisis, British Empire, Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty, Chelsea Manning, clean water, collective bargaining, colonial rule, corporate social responsibility, Corrections Corporation of America, Edward Snowden, facts on the ground, failed state, falling living standards, Ferguson, Missouri, financial independence, full employment, G4S, Goldman Sachs: Vampire Squid, housing crisis, illegal immigration, immigration reform, income inequality, Julian Assange, Kickstarter, mandatory minimum, market fundamentalism, mass incarceration, Naomi Klein, neoliberal agenda, obamacare, Occupy movement, offshore financial centre, open borders, private military company, profit motive, Ralph Nader, Ronald Reagan, Satyajit Das, Scramble for Africa, Slavoj Žižek, stem cell, the medium is the message, trade liberalization, WikiLeaks

In both countries, executive salaries for bosses in the FTSE 100 and top German firms had climbed to well over £3 million, and it was encouraging that some pushback was being exerted against rising corporate pay.17 The list of outsourced work was staggering both within Britain’s borders and among British companies contracted around the world. G4S is a behemoth, operating in 125 countries with over 657,000 employees, whose work has included guarding prisoners in Israeli-run prisons in Palestine. In 2014 the company predicted huge growth in the Middle East, especially in Egypt and the Gulf states. In Britain alone, G4S controlled countless police tasks from 2012 onwards, in a partially privatized system whereby police officers continued to make arrests, but G4S staff processed suspects in their own “custody suites.”18 In 2014, G4S won a $118 million contract to deliver “base operating services” at the US military base at Guantánamo Bay, in Cuba.19 G4S ran countless private prisons across Britain, despite being routinely fined for failing to meet its agreed targets. Occasionally, mainstream politicians criticized Serco, G4S, and other providers, but they did little to enforce greater accountability.20 Founded in 1929, Serco has been ubiquitous in British life, running ferries, London’s Docklands Light Railway, the National Physical Laboratory, prisons, defense contracts, education authorities, waste management, and a host of other operations.

Stand and Fight,” New Statesman, November 4, 2010. 38Emma de Vita, “‘Failure Is Never an Option’—Ruby McGregor-Smith, CEO of Mitie,” Management Today, July 1, 2014. 39Clare Sambrook, “Fail and Prosper: How Privatisation Really Works,” Open Democracy, March 6, 2014, at opendemocracy.net. 40Phil Miller, “‘Care & Custody’: Mitie’s Detention Centre Contracts,” Corporate Watch, September 1, 2014, at corporatewatch.org. 41Jamie Doward, “Children ‘Kept from Parents’ at Centre for Failed Asylum Seekers,” Guardian, April 27, 2014. 42“HM Inspector of Prisons Exposes Deputy Prime Minister’s Fabrication to have Ended Detention of Children,” Medical Justice, October 25, 2012, at medicaljustice.org.uk. 43Karen McVeigh, “Pregnant Woman at Yarl’s Wood Denied Hospital Scan Despite Baby Scare,” Guardian, October 8, 2010. 44Simon Cox, “Whistleblower’s Concerns over Safety at Yarl’s Wood,” BBC Radio 4, File on 4, June 24, 2014. 45Mark Townsend, “Serco, the Observer and a Hunt for the Truth about Yarl’s Wood Asylum Centre,” Guardian, May 18, 2014. 46Karen McVeigh, “Yarl’s Wood Detainees ‘Paid 50p an Hour,’” Guardian, January 3, 2011. 47Phil Miller, “True Scale of Captive Migrant Labour Revealed,” Corporate Watch, August 22, 2014; Phil Miller, “Detained Migrants Slam Low Pay,” Corporate Watch, December 22, 2014, both at corporatewatch.org. 48“Mental Health in Immigration Detention Action Group: Initial Report,” Medical Justice, press release, December 17, 2013, at medicaljustice.org.uk. 49“Detained and Denied: The Clinical Care of Immigration Detainees Living with HIV,” Medical Justice, press release, March 22, 2011, at medicaljustice.org.uk. 50“Expecting Change: The Case for Ending the Detention of Pregnant Women,” Medical Justice, press release, July 23, 2013, at medicaljustice.org.uk. 51“‘The Second Torture’: The Immigration Detention of Torture Survivors,” Medical Justice, press release, May 22, 2012, at medicaljustice.org.uk. 52Haroon Siddique, “G4S Ordered to Pay 6,000 Pounds to Elderly Disabled Man over Hospital Handcuffs,” Guardian, September 25, 2014. 53Rajeev Syal and Solomon Hughes, “New ‘Revolving Door’ Row as G4S Hires Ex-Mandarins,” Guardian, December 26, 2010. 54Paul Lewis and Matthew Taylor, “G4S Security Firm Was Warned of Lethal Risk to Refused Asylum Seekers,” Guardian, February 8, 2011. 55Owen Bowcott, Paul Lewis, and Matthew Taylor, “G4S Security Guards Accused over Restraint of Colombian Deportee,” Guardian, October 21, 2010; Robert Verkaik, “A Disturbing Insight into G4S’s Tactics,” Independent, October 30, 2010. 56Robert Booth and Matthew Taylor, “Jimmy Mubenga’s Widow Shocked as Security Guards Cleared of Manslaughter,” Guardian, December 17, 2014. 57Simon Hattenstone and Eric Allison, “G4S, the Company with No Convictions—But Does It Have Blood on Its Hands?”

Although the 2013 Home Office committee had elicited admissions from officials that it was not sensible to grant housing contracts to organizations with no experience running them, the contracts had already been signed, and G4S had no fear of losing them. As elsewhere, unaccountability functioned as a core value of disaster capitalism. We later drove a short distance to another G4S property. It was a three-story building with nine tenants, in better condition and tidier than the first. An Iranian man, Bozorg, said his housemate had cleaned the place for Ramadan. There was a G4S sign in the entrance hall that read: “This house has now been professionally cleaned: Please keep it clean and tidy at all times.” The G4S “House Rules” read like a prison manual for good behavior. The company barely provided anything of use, and Bozorg said that nothing had been done about an infestation of mice. He had clashed with an African housemate, and did not feel secure. The back garden was overgrown and dirty, and G4S had not sent anybody to clear it up.


pages: 423 words: 21,637

On Lisp: Advanced Techniques for Common Lisp by Paul Graham

Donald Knuth, G4S, Paul Graham, sorting algorithm, Turing machine

We will see how to use this information by hand-generating an expansion for: (incf (aref a (incf i))) When we call get-setf-method on the generalized variable, we get five values intended for use as ingredients in the macroexpansion: > (get-setf-method '(aref a (incf i))) (#:G4 #:G5) (A (INCF I)) (#:G6) (SYSTEM:SET-AREF #:G6 #:G4 #:G5) (AREF #:G4 #:G5) The first two values are lists of temporary variables and the values that should be assigned to them. So we can begin the expansion with: (let* ((#:g4 a) (#:g5 (incf i))) ...) These bindings should be created in a let* because in the general case the value forms can refer to earlier variables. The third(28) and fifth values are another temporary variable and the form that will return the original value of the generalized variable. Since we want to add 1 to this value, we wrap the latter in a call to 1+: (let* ((#:g4 a) (#:g5 (incf i)) (#:g6 (1+ (aref #:g4 #:g5)))) ...) Finally, the fourth value returned by get-setf-method is the assignment that must be made within the scope of the new bindings: (let* ((#:g4 a) (#:g5 (incf i)) (#:g6 (1+ (aref #:g4 #:g5)))) (system:set-aref #:g6 #:g4 #:g5)) More often than not, this form will refer to internal functions which are not part of Common Lisp.

However, information known at compile-time is always a factor worth considering, even if you choose not to take advantage of it. (nthmost 2 nums) expands into: (let ((#:g7 nums)) (unless (< (length #:g7) 3) (let ((#:g6 (pop #:g7))) (setq #:g1 #:g6)) (let ((#:g5 (pop #:g7))) (if (> #:g5 #:g1) (setq #:g2 #:g1 #:g1 #:g5) (setq #:g2 #:g5))) (let ((#:g4 (pop #:g7))) (if (> #:g4 #:g1) (setq #:g3 #:g2 #:g2 #:g1 #:g1 #:g4) (if (> #:g4 #:g2) (setq #:g3 #:g2 #:g2 #:g4) (setq #:g3 #:g4)))) (dolist (#:g8 #:g7) (if (> #:g8 #:g1) (setq #:g3 #:g2 #:g2 #:g1 #:g1 #:g8) (if (> #:g8 #:g2) (setq #:g3 #:g2 #:g2 #:g8) (if (> #:g8 #:g3) (setq #:g3 #:g8) nil)))) #:g3)) Figure 13.4: Expansion of nthmost. 13.2 Bezier Curves Example Like the with- macro (Section 11.2), the macro for computation at compile-time is more likely to be written for a specific application than as a general-purpose utility.

If just one parameter is given, both degenerate to dolist: > (do-tuples/o (x) '(a b c) (princ x)) ABC NIL > (do-tuples/c (x) '(a b c) (princ x)) ABC NIL (defmacro do-tuples/o (parms source &body body) (if parms (let ((src (gensym))) `(prog ((,src ,source)) (mapc #'(lambda ,parms ,@body) ,@(map0-n #'(lambda (n) `(nthcdr ,n ,src)) (1- (length parms)))))))) (defmacro do-tuples/c (parms source &body body) (if parms (with-gensyms (src rest bodfn) (let ((len (length parms))) `(let ((,src ,source)) (when (nthcdr ,(1- len) ,src) (labels ((,bodfn ,parms ,@body)) (do ((,rest ,src (cdr ,rest))) ((not (nthcdr ,(1- len) ,rest)) ,@(mapcar #'(lambda (args) `(,bodfn ,@args)) (dt-args len rest src)) nil) (,bodfn ,@(map1-n #'(lambda (n) `(nth ,(1- n) ,rest)) len)))))))))) (defun dt-args (len rest src) (map0-n #'(lambda (m) (map1-n #'(lambda (n) (let ((x (+ m n))) (if (>= x len) `(nth ,(- x len) ,src) `(nth ,(1- x) ,rest)))) len)) (- len 2))) Figure 11.8: Macros for iteration by subsequences. (do-tuples/c (x y z) '(a b c d) (princ (list x y z))) expands into: (let ((#:g2 '(a b c d))) (when (nthcdr 2 #:g2) (labels ((#:g4 (x y z) (princ (list x y z)))) (do ((#:g3 #:g2 (cdr #:g3))) ((not (nthcdr 2 #:g3)) (#:g4 (nth 0 #:g3) (nth 1 #:g3) (nth 0 #:g2)) (#:g4 (nth 1 #:g3) (nth 0 #:g2) (nth 1 #:g2)) nil) (#:g4 (nth 0 #:g3) (nth 1 #:g3) (nth 2 #:g3)))))) Figure 11.9: Expansion of a call to do-tuples/c. The definition of do-tuples/c is more complex than that of do-tuples/o, because it has to wrap around on reaching the end of the list. If there are n parameters, do-tuples/c must do n-1 more iterations before returning: > (do-tuples/c (x y z) '(a b c d) (princ (list x y z))) (A B C)(B C D)(C D A)(D A B) NIL > (do-tuples/c (w x y z) '(a b c d) (princ (list w x y z))) (A B C D)(B C D A)(C D A B)(D A B C) NIL The expansion of the former call to do-tuples/c is shown in Figure 11.9.


pages: 347 words: 44,532

Lonely Planet Pocket Florence (Travel Guide) by Planet, Lonely, Maxwell, Virginia, Williams, Nicola

G4S, haute couture, Kickstarter, urban planning

Stroll west to Officina Profumo-Farmaceutica di Santa Maria Novella ( Click here ) – perfect for take-home gifts – then hit Sei Divino ( Click here ) for that all-essential aperitivo (pre-dinner drinks accompanied by cocktail snacks). Dine nearby at L’Osteria di Giovanni ( Click here ). Santa Maria Top Sights Basilica di Santa Maria Novella G2 Sights 1 Museo Marino Marini G4 2 Chiesa di Santa Trìnita H5 3 Chiesa d'Ognissanti F4 4 Ponte Santa Trìnita H5 5 Parco delle Cascine A1 Eating 6 Mariano H5 7 L'Osteria di Giovanni G4 8 Il Latini G4 Drinking 9 Sei Divino F4 10 Caffè Giacosa H4 11 Space Club F3 Entertainment 12 Teatro del Maggio Musicale Fiorentino B2 Shopping 13 Letizia Fiorini G4 14 Mio Concept G4 15 Dolce Forte F3 16 Grevi H4 17 Aprosio & Co G4 18 Desii Lab G4 19 Alessandro Gherardeschi G4 20 Alberto Cozzi G5 21 Le Gare 24 F4 22 Loretta Caponi H3 Top Sights Basilica di Santa Maria Novella Offline map, G2 www.chiesasantamarianovella.it Piazza di Santa Maria Novella 18 adult/reduced €5/3 9am-5.30pm Mon-Thu, 11am-5.30pm Fri, 9am-5pm Sat, 1-5pm Sun This monastery complex, fronted by the striking marble facade of its basilica, hides romantic church cloisters and a stunning frescoed chapel behind its monumental walls.

Watch the sun set over the city from Piazzale Michelangelo ( Click here ) and make your way to Le Volpi e l’Uva ( Click here ) for a pre-dinner drink. From here, the perennially popular restaurants and lounge bars of the Oltrano are only a short walk away. For a local’s day in Boboli & San Miniato al Monte, Click here . Boboli Top Sights Palazzo Pitti C2 Sights 1 Basilica di San Miniato al Monte G4 2 Museo di Storia Naturale - Zoologia La Specola B2 3 Chiesa di Santa Felicità D1 4 Forte di Belvedere D3 5 Porta San Niccolò G2 Eating 6 Da Ruggero A5 7 Enoteca Fuori Porta F2 Drinking 8 Le Volpi e l'Uva D1 9 Open Bar D1 10 Zoé F2 11 James Joyce H2 Shopping 12 Alessandro Dari E2 13 Lorenzo Villoresi E2 Top Sights Palazzo Pitti Offline map, C2 www.polomuseale.firenze.it Piazza dei Pitti adult/EU 18-25/EU child & senior Ticket 3 €11.50/5.75/free 8.15am-6.05pm Tue-Sun Wealthy banker Luca Pitti commissioned Brunelleschi to design this huge palace in 1457, but by the time it was completed the family fortunes were on the wane and they were forced to sell it to arch-rivals, the Medicis.


pages: 388 words: 125,472

The Establishment: And How They Get Away With It by Owen Jones

anti-communist, Asian financial crisis, bank run, battle of ideas, Big bang: deregulation of the City of London, bonus culture, Boris Johnson, Bretton Woods, British Empire, call centre, capital controls, Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty, centre right, citizen journalism, collapse of Lehman Brothers, collective bargaining, don't be evil, Edward Snowden, Etonian, eurozone crisis, falling living standards, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, full employment, G4S, glass ceiling, hiring and firing, housing crisis, inflation targeting, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), investor state dispute settlement, James Dyson, laissez-faire capitalism, light touch regulation, market fundamentalism, mass immigration, Monroe Doctrine, Mont Pelerin Society, moral hazard, Neil Kinnock, night-watchman state, Northern Rock, Occupy movement, offshore financial centre, old-boy network, open borders, plutocrats, Plutocrats, popular capitalism, profit motive, quantitative easing, race to the bottom, rent control, road to serfdom, Ronald Reagan, shareholder value, short selling, sovereign wealth fund, stakhanovite, statistical model, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, transfer pricing, union organizing, unpaid internship, Washington Consensus, wealth creators, Winter of Discontent

But neo-liberal dogma has gone far beyond even the so-called ‘night-watchman state’. Even the British bobby is up for sale. In 2012, Lincolnshire police signed a £200 million contract with G4S, leaving half its civilian force under the control of the company. Towards the end of 2013, Avon and Somerset Police put their custody suites and prisoner-transport services up to tender, with five companies, including G4S, competing to take them over. Until the G4S Olympics debacle led them to abandon it, the West Midlands and Surrey police forces had invited a bid worth £1.5 billion from the company, which would have left private security companies patrolling the streets and investigating crimes. But there are good reasons to believe that the head of G4S, David Taylor-Smith, was right when in June 2012 he suggested private companies would be in control of large swathes of the police within five years.

In February 2011, David Cameron announced that what he described as the ‘state monopoly’ of public services was over. Everything was now up for grabs. From the justice system to defence, the running of all services was now to be opened up to profiteering companies such as G4S, Serco and Sodexo. Mountains of taxpayer-provided cash awaited them. Around half of G4S’s profits in Britain came from government contracts. In 2012, £4 billion of taxpayers’ money was shovelled into the accounts of the biggest private contractors: Serco, G4S, Atos and Capita. It led to a damning assessment from the National Audit Office, which Margaret Hodge, chair of the Public Accounts Committee, summed up: this outsourcing, she concluded, had created ‘quasi-monopolies’ in the public sector, the ‘inhibiting of whistleblowers’, the trapping of taxpayers into lengthy contracts, and a ‘number of contracts that are not subject to proper competition’.

Long before Olympic hype was in full swing, it was clear that the taxpayer stood to haemorrhage money to G4S. By the end of 2011 their management fee had soared from £7.3 million to a whopping £60 million, the bulk of it for the firm’s ‘programme management office’. On the eve of the Olympics, G4S announced that it would not be able to provide the numbers of security personnel promised. Predictably, the state was forced to step in – mobilizing 3,500 soldiers. Even the most ardent apologists of Establishment ideology were forced onto the defensive. ‘I came into the MoD with a prejudice that we have to look at the way the private sector does things to know how we should do things in government,’ said the Defence Secretary Philip Hammond. ‘But the story of G4S and the military rescue is quite informative.’ Hammond then provided a succinct definition of the difference between private and public delivery.


pages: 301 words: 100,597

My Life as a Goddess: A Memoir Through (Un)Popular Culture by Guy Branum

bitcoin, different worldview, G4S, Google Glasses, Joan Didion, Kickstarter, Mark Zuckerberg, oil shale / tar sands, out of africa, pets.com, plutocrats, Plutocrats, Rosa Parks, Sapir-Whorf hypothesis, Silicon Valley, Snapchat, telemarketer

If you’re authoritative and funny, you can make teenage boys be fascinated by anything.4 5. When you can tell your show is about to be canceled, start stealing office supplies. Everyone else is losing their job, too, so they won’t notice. I learned to be a functional, competent little writer at G4. My last job there was as head writer of X-Play, a video game review show that had sketches in it. The hosts, Adam Sessler and Morgan Webb, were funny, kind, and knew more about video games than nearly anyone on the staff. The fanboys of G4, who would grow up to become the trolls who gave us Gamergate, cut their teeth challenging the “real gamer” status of Adam and Morgan. This was ridiculous. I was the one who knew nothing about video games. They were, if anything, the last line of editorial defense against my ignorance.

It was quiz bowl as a workplace. It was pretty great. I worked on that show for two years, and I might have stayed longer if it hadn’t become clear that I was no longer welcome on-camera. See, the whole time I was at G4, I was doing bit parts in sketches. It was fun and meant I occasionally got recognized by nerds on the street. Over time, the nice bosses who’d hired me went away and were replaced by men in their fifties desperately trying to pander to men in their early twenties. They wanted boobs and dudes wearing leather wrist cuffs. To them, having a bald fat gay guy on-camera seemed somewhat at odds with G4’s purpose. I stopped getting cast in stuff. I felt a little shallow for being mad that I wasn’t getting to be on-camera, but fundamentally, I felt like the executives didn’t trust me anymore. I’d guided the show’s voice for two relatively successful years, but now they seemed to think my instincts weren’t “male” enough for the show.

I’d guided the show’s voice for two relatively successful years, but now they seemed to think my instincts weren’t “male” enough for the show. That’s when I learned the importance of workplace whining. G4 was part of Comcast, which meant that for the last few years, we shared offices with E! Entertainment Television. That meant that the guy whose desk was directly opposite mine was a very thin, very attractive, very catty gay guy, Jesse. On my first day in the office, I laughed loudly, as I do, and Jesse leaned into the cubicle next to his and stage-whispered to the muscular accountant next to him, “If I have to listen to that laugh every day, I’m going to hang myself.” We were soon the dearest of frenemies. So I was DM-bitching to Jesse about the growing lack of respect I was feeling from the G4 higher-ups. Normally, Jesse would tell me to stop complaining so he could go back to talking about the hot guy he’d almost-fucked in Laguna Beach the previous weekend, but this time he just asked, “Would you want another job?”


pages: 137 words: 43,960

Top 10 Maui, Molokai and Lanai by Bonnie Friedman

airport security, centre right, Charles Lindbergh, G4S, Maui Hawaii, polynesian navigation, Ronald Reagan

JOSEPH‘S CHURCH Mamalu Bay ‘Alen ui 6 L…na‘i ‘A Shipwreck Beach PO Polihua Beach L IH au Federation Camp UA TR C h AIL an n e AT RAI L l Garden of the Gods Pu‘u Mahana 4714ft Kane Pu‘u Forest Preserve Gulc h EN 430 OL UH UA RD K≥‘ele Nanohoa Is MU NRO TR AI Lana‘i City L Keone Bay K HW Y KA l… wa L…na‘ihale Luahiwa 3370ft Petroglyphs P≥ka‘i i Basin Naha UP I LI RD M…kole Point 440 Pacific Ocean L≥p… RD P… Lana‘i ~ Airport 440 ELE AU MAL A P A U M¡N Ki‘el Bay Kaumalapau Harbor Ke≥muku l a P Ha uo K A‘ u‘ La M¡NELE BAY RESORT Hulopo‘e Bay Kaunol« 4 8 miles g M…nele Bay 0 km 4 8 iluaBay Kea Beach N…hiku HA NA H I GH W ~ Wai‘…napanapa State Park w ak oe lle H…na Airport KAHANU GARDENS Gu y h Ka m Va r ea a St Ku hiw Pi‘ilanihale Heiau 360 lc DE AY Kawa i p a p a G ulc Pailoa Bay Kainalimu Bay h H…na Cultural Center H…na Bay Kau‘iki Hill H…na M o om o o n u i G u l ch Wa iho 31 ‘i Va l Park ‘O h Gu HI G lc HW Koali AY M«‘olea Wailua Pepeiaolepo Bay KEY NI h WAIMOKU FALLS K…ki‘o Pu‘uiki Keawa Bay H…‘≥‘« WAILUA FALLS e‘o Kipahulu Valley ll ey Hoku‘ula H…moa H…moa Beach MAKAHIKU FALLS PI ‘I LA K≤pahulu Lighthouse Country Park Kipahulu Mokulau Huialoha Church Lelekea Bay Palapala Ho‘omau Church a Ch … h…h nn Top 10 place of interest Other place of interest Papaloa Bay ~ Domestic airport g Ferry port el Highway Main road Minor road Track Park boundary 3 miles 0 km 3 6 Summit ha in a UE AV A O AN IP L 37 AY AD 370 PA WE ST Alexander and Baldwin Sugar Museum HA NS EN R O AD AN IS Pu’unænæ 380 SP HONOA PI’ILANI OL HI GHWAY PA E KE HALEA KALA HW RO E U EN HA ME HA ME NU UE VE EN UE KA IG 36 V ∞ A EN R OAD WA KEA AVEN UE W AIALE Kanaha Pond State Bird Sanctuary A ∞N Kahului Park ¡N H EN TH AV U H ’UN Maui Memorial Park AV AN EL IH IK O RO ULE AD 2000 1000 Maui, Moloka‘i & L…na‘i Index Bailey House Museum Federation Camp Garden of Eden Arboretum Garden of the Gods H…lawa Valley H…lena H…li‘imaile H…m…kua Polo H…moa H…na H…na Cultural Center Ha‘ik« Hale Pa‘i Haleakal… National Park Hawai‘i Nature Center Ho‘okipa Ho‘olehua Hoku‘ula Honok≥hau Honok≥wai Honokahua Honolua Huelo Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary ‘§ao Valley State Park K«‘au K≤hei K≥‘ele K…‘anapali K…ki‘o Kæ≥kea Kahakuloa Kahana Kahikinui Ranch Kahului Kailua Kala‘e Kalama‘ula Kalaupapa 350 MOK K≠ Waikap« WA HIG I HI HWA G Y H W AD A RO Y H Maui Tropical Plantation LE Y E U H P S O PA HIGHWA A VENU Kahului A S OUT H P 30 Hoaloha Park Maui Arts and Cultural Center KA’AHUMANU Ka’ahumanu Church Wailuku Public Library Wailuku Kahului Harbor Y KANALOA AD R A VE A M LO ST 32 T S TREE Keopuolani Park UT N War Memorial Park SO T TS MAI E ET WE R KE Bailey House Museum STR EA L RO AR NM n M IL Kahului Harbor Park CH KA E AI NU IN o n Tourist information D ST RE Other sight ET EA UI B ‘§a Top10 sight LON am re St HEKILI KEY Pauk«kalo Haleki’i/ Pihana Heiau HUL 330 Paukukalo Park KA HIG HWA Y Wailuku & Kahului N2 L1 J3 K1 D5 A6 F3 F2 L5 L4 L4 G2 C3 J5 D3 F2 B5 L4 C1 B2 C1 C1 H3 E4 D3 F2 E4 L2 B2 L5 F5 D2 C2 H6 P2 J3 C5 B6 C5 yards 0 meters Kalaupapa National Historical Park Kalawao Kalua‘aha Kaluako‘i Kama‘ole Kamal≥ Kanahena Kanaio Kapalua Kaunakakai Kaunol« Kaup≥ Kaupakulua Kawela Ke‘anae Ke≥muku Ke…lia Pond Keawakapu Keawala‘i Keka‘a Keoneoio Kepaniwai Park Kipahulu Kipahulu Valley Koali Kokomo Kualapu‘u Kuiaha Kula Lahaina Lahainaluna Lana‘i City Launiupoko Luahiwa Petroglyphs M«‘olea M…‘alaea M…kena Makawao Malaihi Maui Arts and Cultural Center Maui Ocean Center 1000 C5 C5 D6 A5 E5 D6 E6 G6 C1 C6 L3 J6 H3 C6 J3 M2 E4 E5 E5 B2 E6 D3 K5 K5 L5 G3 C5 G2 G4 C3 C3 L2 C3 L2 L5 D4 E5 G3 D2 P1 D4 2000 Maunalei Arboretum C1 Maunaloa A6 Mo‘omomi B5 Mo‘omomi Nature Preserve B5 Mokulau K5 Moloka‘i Musuem and Cultural Center C5 Moloka'i Forest Reserve C6 N…hiku K3 N…k…lele Point D1 Naha M2 Napili C2 Nu‘u J6 Olinda H4 Olowalu C4 ªma‘opio G4 P…´ia F2 P…palaua D4 Pa‘uwela G2 Pi‘ilanihale Heiau K4 Pu‘u o H≥k« Ranch E5 Pu‘uiki L5 Pu‘unænæ Q3 Pu‘uohala E3 Puka‘auhuhu J6 Pukalani F3 Pukoo D6 Puleh« G4 Spreckelsville F3 Tedeschi Winery F5 ‘Ualapu‘e D6 Ulumalu H3 ‘Ulupalakua Ranch F5 Upper P…´ia F3 Wai‘…napanapa State Park L4 Waiakoa G4 Waiehu E2 Waihe‘e D2 Waikap« N3 Wailea E5 Wailua J3 Wailuku N2 Waiohuli G5 EYEWITNESS TOP 10 TRAVEL GUIDES TOP10 MAUI MOLOKA‘I & LANA‘I Whether you are traveling first class or on a limited budget, this Eyewitness Top 10 guide will lead you straight to the very best Maui, Moloka‘i and L…na‘i have to offer. • Dozens of Top 10 lists - from the Top 10 beaches and golf courses to the Top 10 restaurants, shops, and spots for watersports - provide the insider knowledge every visitor needs.

With three bedrooms, it can easily sleep six, and the cottage has all the amenities a family could want, including a washer/dryer, a barbecue, and a fridge that is replenished daily with breakfast goodies. d 44 Pea Pl., Kula • Map G4 • 808 283 7733 • $$ Bloom House & Bloom Cottage A three-bedroom house and a two-bedroom cottage just a garden walk away form a perfect partnership for a large family or group of friends. Both are extremely well equipped and tastefully decorated. A little traffic noise by day and chilly at night, so the fireplaces come in handy. d 229 Kula Hwy. • Map G4 • 808 579 8282 • www.hookipa. com • $$ Hale Ho’okipa Inn Olinda Country Cottages & Inn Near the top of Olinda above Makawao town, this is a special little romantic hideaway. The main house has two guest rooms and one “sweet;” there are also two cottages on site, complete with quilts and fireplaces – at the 4,000-ft level of Mt.

Sun Yat-sen Memorial Park A statue of the revolutionary Dr. Sun Yat-sen, the first president of the Republic of China, stands in this small park in Keokea. His brother, Sun Mei, was one of the many Chinese immigrants who settled in this area, and the doctor hid his family here with him during the Chinese Revolution of 1911. The park occupies around 6,000 acres of land that once belonged to his brother. d Map G4 Tedeschi Winery Free daily tours and tastings are held at Tedeschi, Maui’s only winery. Established in 1974, Tedeschi produces sparkling, red, and blush wines, along with its most famous product, a sweet pineapple wine called Maui Blanc. d Map F5 • 9am–5pm daily • Free tours at 10:30am & 1:30pm • www.mauiwine.com ‘Ulupalakua Ranch Ship captain James Makee established the ranch in 1856 and built a house for his large family, cisterns to capture water, a sugar mill to generate income, and a cottage for his frequent guest, King Kal…kaua.


pages: 277 words: 41,815

Lonely Planet Pocket Berlin by Lonely Planet, Andrea Schulte-Peevers

Albert Einstein, Berlin Wall, call centre, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Frank Gehry, G4S, haute cuisine, indoor plumbing, Peter Eisenman, Ronald Reagan, Ronald Reagan: Tear down this wall, upwardly mobile, urban planning, urban renewal

Reichstag Unter Linden Top Sights Brandenburg Gate & Pariser Platz D3 Holocaust Memorial D4 Reichstag & Government Quarter C2 Sights 1 Gendarmenmarkt G4 2 Deutsches Historisches Museum H3 3 Tränenpalast F2 4 Bebelplatz G3 5 Neue Wache H3 6 Hitler's Bunker D4 7 Emil Nolde Museum G4 8 Friedrichswerdersche Kirche H4 9 Deutsche Guggenheim Berlin G3 10 Humboldt Universität G3 Eating 11 Fischers Fritz G4 12 Uma D4 13 Borchardt F4 14 Cookies Cream F3 15 Augustiner am Gendarmenmarkt G4 16 ChaChã F5 17 Ishin F3 Drinking Cookies (see 14) 18 Bebel Bar G3 19 Tausend E2 20 Felix D4 21 Tadschikische Teestube H3 22 Berliner Republik F2 Entertainment 23 Admiralspalast F2 24 Berliner Ensemble E1 25 Haus der Kulturen der Welt A2 26 Konzerthaus Berlin G4 27 Staatsoper Unter den Linden G3 Shopping 28 Dussmann – Das Kulturkaufhaus F3 29 Fassbender & Rausch G5 30 Friedrichstadtpassagen F4 Top Sights Reichstag & Government Quarter Offline map www.bundestag.de Platz der Republik 1 admission free 8am-midnight, last lift 11pm U-Bahn Bundestag, Brandenburger Tor; 100 The nexus of German political power snuggles neatly into the Spreebogen, a horseshoe-shaped bend in the Spree River.

Wrap up the evening with a fat glass of Bordeaux at Place Clichy (Click here) or cocktails at Süss war Gestern (Click here). Friedrichshain Top Sights East Side Gallery C4 Sights 1 Karl-Marx-Allee E1 Eating 2 Schwarzer Hahn G3 3 Spätzle & Knödel G3 4 Michelberger D5 5 Lemon Leaf F3 6 Bürgeramt F3 Drinking 7 Hops & Barley G3 8 Kptn A Müller F3 9 Place Clichy E3 10 Süss War Gestern G4 11 Strandgut Berlin B4 12 Berghain/Panorama Bar C3 13 ://about blank G5 14 Zum Schmutzigen Hobby F4 15 Himmelreich F3 16 Monster Ronson's Ichiban Karaoke D4 Entertainment 17 Astra Kulturhaus E4 Shopping 18 Flohmarkt am Boxhagener Platz F3 19 Mondos Arts G1 Top Sights East Side Gallery Offline map www.eastsidegallery-berlin.de Mühlenstrasse btwn Oberbaumbrücke & Ostbahnhof admission free 24hr U-/S-Bahn Warschauer Strasse; S-Bahn Ostbahnhof The year was 1989.


pages: 273 words: 83,802

Hostile Environment: How Immigrants Became Scapegoats by Maya Goodfellow

Boris Johnson, British Empire, call centre, collective bargaining, colonial rule, creative destruction, deindustrialization, Donald Trump, European colonialism, falling living standards, G4S, housing crisis, illegal immigration, low skilled workers, mass immigration, megacity, moral panic, open borders, race to the bottom, Right to Buy, Scientific racism, Winter of Discontent, working poor

But a coroner’s report that had been written three years after Jimmy’s death said the texts were ‘not evidence of a couple of “rotten apples”’ but seemed to ‘evidence a more pervasive racism within G4S’.18 By the time the report was released, G4S had already been given the asylum housing contract. Before the switch went ahead, a mix of local authorities, housing associations and private contractors had been responsible for the accommodation of asylum seekers. Cross says the shift away from local authorities was ‘very obvious’ and the private sector offered much lower cost contracts, but that came with ‘absolute pairing down in the contracts’. Support for people was ‘pretty much annihilated’, putting more pressure on organisations like WERS. Though these private companies claim to take housing quality into account, there is a growing body evidence to the contrary. In 2016, G4S – a company that paid no corporation tax in 2012, the same year it was given the contract – was fined £5.6 million for the low standard of the asylum housing it provided in 2013/14.

But the disorientation that comes with being shipped off to an area you don’t know can be made even worse if you get to your new home only to find it damp, rotting or infested with insects, mice and rats.15 In 2012, estimated to amount to £620 million, six contracts shifted housing provision into the hands of three private companies, G4S, Serco and Clearel. It wasn’t ever apparent what qualifications the first two had to be given this responsibility; only Clearel had any experience of providing housing.16 When the new housing providers were announced, security firm G4S was probably best known for having been involved in the death of forty-six-year-old Jimmy Mubenga when, in 2010, three of the company’s guards restrained him on board a flight to Angola. After seventeen years in the UK, Mubenga was being deported to the southern African country and in the process being separated from his wife and five children.

In 2016, G4S – a company that paid no corporation tax in 2012, the same year it was given the contract – was fined £5.6 million for the low standard of the asylum housing it provided in 2013/14. In Middlesbrough, when G4S inspected housing provided by Jomast – a company G4S subcontracts to – they found urgent defects in 14 per cent of properties. Later, Home Office inspections found urgent defects in 91 per cent of properties. Jomast was reported to be taking £8 million from the taxpayer.19 As asylum seekers were being sent to live in squalid conditions, the government was still handing millions of pounds’ worth of contracts to the private housing providers. The people I speak to aren’t just victims of the immigration regime; they’re much more than their immigration status. But they’re angry about the way they’ve been treated; they talk about their experiences to expose the impact of the UK’s immigration and asylum rules and to advocate for change.


Top 10 Greek Islands by Dorling Kindersley Publishing Staff

centre right, G4S, the market place

Sights include the Ágios Dionýsios church. d Map H4 Museum @ Byzantine This museum’s collection of ecclesiastical art was saved from churches and monasteries destroyed in the 1953 earthquake. Agía Paraskeví, which has the finest gilded iconostasis screens on the island. d Map G4 Beach & Navágio This stunning beach is often called Shipwreck Bay because of a freighter that sits partially buried in the sand in this sheltered cove. d Near Volímes • Map G4 * Anafonítria Zákynthos’ patron saint, d Plateía Solomóu, Zákynthos Town • Map H4 • 26950 42714 • Open 8:30am–3pm Tue–Sun • Adm St Dionýsios, was a monk at the 14th-century monastery of Panagía Anafonítria, located in this sleepy mountain village. Caves £ Blue These caves have amazing d Near Volímes • Map G4 sculpted rock formations and caverns, surrounded by a sapphire blue sea. Take a boat out for the best view. d Cape Skinári • Map H3 $ Kerí One of the few villages to escape destruction in the 1953 earthquake, Kerí retains original stone houses.

(in the UK) travelspecialsales@ uk.dk.com (in Canada) DK Special Sales at general@tourmaline.ca (in Australia) business.development@ pearson.com.au 191 Selected Map Index Selected Map Index 192 Agía Marína Agia Triada Agiásos Ágios Efstrátios Alónissos Ammopí Amníssos Amorgós Anáfi Anafonítria Andíkýthira Andímilos Andíparos Andípaxi Andípsara Ándissa Andítílos Ándros Ándros Town Angístri Anidro Áno Méra Áno Sagrí Antimácheia Apeíranthos Apéri Apóllon Argos Argostóli Arkása Armathiá Armenistís Asklepieíon Asklipeió Aspronisi Astypálea Avgónyma Benítses Bourtzi Chalkí Chaniá Chryssí Corfu Corfu Town Crete Delos Despotikó Diá Día Diafáni Dokós Donoússa Dragonáda Dýo Adélfia Égina Égina Town Elafónissos Émbona Ereíkoussa Erínia Ermoúpoli Évvia Firá Fiskárdo Folégandros Foúrni Gávdopula Gávdos Gioúra Glinádo Glóssa Górtys Gyáros Halkída Híos Híos Town Hóra Ikaría Imerovígli L1 E6 R2 E2 N1 Y6 E6 F4 F5 G4 D5 D4 E4 B2 E3 Q2 G5 M4 N4 J2 E5 P6 R5 X2 R5 X5 S4 M1 G3 X6 W6 F4 Y1 U5 T2 F5 K5 B5 K3 R5 D6 F6 B4 A2 E6 E4 E4 G3 E6 Y4 D4 F4 F6 N1 L1 K1 C5 U5 A1 P2 N6 M2 U2 G2 E5 F4 D6 D6 N1 Q5 M1 E6 M5 M3 F3 L5 F5 F4 U2 Inoússes Íos Irákleia Irákleio Itháki Kalamos Kalloní Kálymnos Kamári Kámeiros Kardámena Kárpathos Kassiópi Kássos Kastro Kéa Kefalloniá Kéfalos Kerí Kéros Kímolos Kinera Kithros Komiakí Kos Kos Town Koufonísi Koufoníssi Kými Kypséli Kyrá Panagía Kýthira Kýthnos Lefkáda Lefkáda Town Lefkimmi Lefkós Léros Lésvos Límnos Líndos Lipsí Lipsí Town Lixouri Lourdáta Loutrá Edipsoú Madouri Maherádo Malia Mantamádos Mastichári Meganíssi Melinádo Menetés Mesagrós Mestá Méthanna Methanon Mílos Míthymna (Mólyvos) Moní Monólithos Mýkonos Mýkonos Town Mýrtos Mytilíni Town Náxos Náxos Town Néa Kaméni Níssyros Ochthoniá Oía Olýmbi Ólympos Othonoí Óthos Pahiá Ráhi Palaia Kaméni Palaiokastró L4 E5 E4 E6 H2 H1 R2 W1 W2 U4 X2 X5 B4 W6 M1 E4 G2 W2 H4 E4 E4 E1 H2 R4 W2 Y1 S6 F6 N3 K1 N1 C5 E4 G1 G1 B6 X5 F4 F2 E1 U5 F4 F4 G3 G3 D2 H1 H4 E6 R1 X2 H1 H4 X6 L1 K6 K3 K2 D5 R1 K2 T5 P6 P6 E6 S2 E4 Q4 U2 X3 N3 T1 K6 X4 A1 X5 L2 T2 P6 Paleó Pýlí Paleohóra Paleókastro Pároikia Páros Patitíri Pátmos Paxí Paximádia Pélekas Pérdika Peristéra Petaloúdes Pétra Pigádia Pipéri Plati Póros Póros Town Psará Psérimos Psíra Pýrgi Réthymno Rhodes Salamína Salamína Town Sámi Sámos Samothráki Santoríni Sérifos Sidári Sífnos Síkinos Skála Skála Kameírou Skantzoúra Skiáthos Skiáthos Town Skópelos Skópelos Town Skorpídi Skorpiós Skýros Skýros Town Spárti Spétses Spétses Town Spetsoúla Spinalonga Stení Strofades Sykaminiá Sými Sými Town Sýros Thássos Thássos Town Thirassía Tigáki Tílos Tínos Tínos Town Trikéri Tsougriá Valáxa Velopoúla Volímes Volissós Vrontádos Ýdra Ýdra Town Yérakas Zákynthos Zákynthos Town X2 L1 G3 E4 E4 N1 F4 B2 E6 A5 K2 N1 U4 R1 Y6 P1 X1 L3 K3 E3 X1 F6 K6 E6 U5 D3 D3 G3 F4 E1 E5 E4 A4 E4 E5 H3 T5 N2 M1 M1 M1 M1 H1 H1 P2 P2 H1 D4 D4 D4 F6 N3 B4 R1 G5 G5 M6 E1 E1 T2 X1 G5 N5 N5 D4 M1 P2 D4 G4 K4 L5 D4 D4 D2 G4 H4

Other attractions include Píso Aetós, believed to be the site of Odysseus’s palace, and the pretty Fríkes harbour. d Map H2 island with high mountains clothed in cypress trees and some stunning beaches, the most famous of which are Navágio (see p74) and Laganás bay in the south. Its bustling capital, Zákynthos Town, was rebuilt to its original Venetian look and layout after being destroyed in the 1953 earthquake. Places to visit include the beautiful Blue Caves (see p36), where the sea has eroded the rocks into caverns. d Map G4 Venetian-style arcade, Zákynthos Town ) Andípaxi Lying to Paxí’s south is the small satellite island of Andípaxi, with a population of less than 60 permanent inhabitants. It is a haven of clear turquoise waters and golden beaches, including Vríka beach, nestled in a sheltered cove, and nearby Voutoúmi beach. It is possible to take a walk along the coastal path that links the two. Andípaxi, which can be reached by boat from Gäios on Paxí, is covered with vineyards, which provide the grapes used to make its local wine. d Map B2 Morning The Ionian islands are scattered over a large area and not given to island hopping in the same way as the other Greek island groups.


Rome by Lonely Planet

bike sharing scheme, call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, double helix, G4S, Index librorum prohibitorum, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, low cost airline, Murano, Venice glass, Skype, urban planning

Don’t Miss… ➡ Fontana dei Quattro Fiumi ➡ Chiesa di Sant’Agnese in Agone ➡ Palazzo Pamphilj Practicalities ➡ Offline map ➡ Corso del Rinascimento Centro Storico North Top Sights Chiesa del GesùG6 Chiesa di San Luigi dei FrancesiE4 Museo Nazionale Romano: Palazzo AltempsE3 Palazzo e Galleria Doria PamphiljH5 Pantheon F4 Piazza Navona E4 Sights 1 Arco degli Acetari D6 2 Arco Farnese C7 3 Area Sacra F6 Basilica di San Lorenzo in Damaso (see 30) 4 Campo de' Fiori D6 5 Cat Sanctuary F7 6 Chiesa di San Giovanni Battista dei FiorentiniA4 7 Chiesa di San Lorenzo in LucinaG1 8 Chiesa di Santa Maria della Pace & Chiostro del Bramante D4 9 Chiesa di Santa Maria Sopra Minerva G5 10 Chiesa di Sant'Agnese in Agone D4 11 Chiesa di Sant'Agostino E3 12 Chiesa di Sant'Andrea della ValleE6 13 Chiesa di Sant'Eligio degli Orefici B6 14 Chiesa di Sant'Ignazio di LoyolaH4 15 Chiesa di Sant'lvo alla SapienzaE5 16 Chiesa Nuova C4 17 Colonna di Marco Aurelio H3 18 Elefantino F5 19 Fontana dei Quattro Fiumi E4 20 Fontana del Moro E5 21 Fontana del Nettuno E4 Galleria Spada (see 37) 22 Largo di Torre Argentina F6 23 Museo Barracco di Scultura AnticaD6 24 Museo Criminologico B5 25 Museo di Roma D5 26 Museo Nazionale Romano: Crypta BalbiG7 27 Obelisk G3 28 Oratorio dei Filippini C4 29 Palazzo Chigi H3 30 Palazzo della Cancelleria D5 31 Palazzo della Sapienza E5 32 Palazzo di MontecitorioG3 33 Palazzo Farnese C7 34 Palazzo MadamaE4 35 Palazzo Nardini C4 36 Palazzo PamphiljD5 37 Palazzo Spada D7 38 Pasquino D5 39 Piè di Marmo G5 40 Stadio di Domiziano D3 41 Tempio di Adriano G4 42 Torre dell'Orologio C4 Eating 43 Alfredo e Ada B4 44Antico Forno RoscioliE7 45 Armando Al Pantheon F4 46 Baffetto 2 D6 47 Campana E2 Campo de' Fiori (see 4) 48 Casa Bleve E5 49Casa CoppelleF3 Chiostro del Bramante Caffè(see 8) 50 Cul de Sac D5 51 Da Francesco C4 52 Da Tonino C4 53 Ditirambo D6 54 Enoteca Corsi G6 55 Filetti di Baccalà E7 56 Fiocco di Neve F4 57Forno di Campo de' FioriD6 58 Gelateria del Teatro C3 59 Gelateria Giolitti F3 60 Gino G2 61 Grappolo d'Oro D6 62 Green T G5 63II BacaroF3 64La Cantina di Ninco NancoF4 65 La Focaccia D4 66 La Rosetta F4 67 Les Affiches D5 68 Lilli D3 69 Lo Zozzone D4 70 Maccheroni F3 71 Matricianella G1 72 Obikà F2 73 Obikà D6 74 Osteria Ar Galletto D6 75 Osteria dell'Ingegno G4 76 Osteria Sostegno F4 77 Pizzeria al Leoncino G1 78 Pizzeria da Baffetto C5 79 Pizzeria la Montecarlo D5 80 Renato e Luisa F6 81 Ristorante Settimio F4 82Roman KitchenH5 83 San Crispino F4 84Sergio alla GrotteD7 85 Zazà E4 Drinking & Nightlife 86 Bar della Pace D4 87 Barnum Cafe C5 88 Caffè Farnese D6 89 Caffè Sant'Eustachio F5 90 Caffè Tazza d'Oro G4 91 Ciampini G1 92 Circus C4 93 Etablì C4 94 Femme D6 95 Gran Caffè la Caffettiera H4 96II GoccettoB5 97 La Maison D4 98 L'Angolo Divino D7 99 Salotto 42 G4 100 Vineria Reggio D6 Entertainment 101English Theatre of Rome at Teatro L'ArciliutoD4 102 Teatro Argentina F6 103 Teatro dell'Orologio C4 104 Teatro Valle E5 Shopping 105 Ai Monasteri E3 106 Al Sogno E3 107 Alberta Gloves G6 108 Aldo Fefè F3 109Anniable GamarelliF5 110 Arsenale C5 111 AS Roma Store H3 112 Bartolucci G4 113 Bertè E5 114 Casali B3 115 Città del Sole E3 116 Comics Bazar B5 117Confetteria Moriondo & GariglioG5 118 Cuadros Roma C4 119DaDADAD7 120 Davide Cenci F3 121 De Sanctis G4 122 Feltrinelli F6 123GhezziF6 124Ibiz - Artigianato in CuoioE7 125 Le Tele di Carlotta D3 126 Libreria del Viaggiatore C6 127 Loco D6 128 Luna & L'Altra D5 129 Mondello Ottica C5 130 Nardecchia D4 131 Officina Profumo Farmaceutica di Santa Maria Novella E4 132Omeri & CeciliaC5 133 Posto Italiano E7 134 Rachele D6 135 Retrò C4 136 Sciù Scià F5 137 Spazio Sette F7 138Statuaria – Arte SacraF5 139 Stilo Fetti G4 140 Tartarughe G5 141 Tempi Moderni C5 142 Vestiti Usati Cinzia C5 143 ZouZou D5 Sleeping 144 Albergo AbruzziF4 145 Albergo del SoleE6 146 Argentina ResidenzaF6 147 Casa di Santa BrigidaC6 148 Hotel Campo de' FioriD6 149 Hotel Due TorriE2 150 Hotel MimosaF5 151 Hotel NavonaE5 152 Hotel Teatro di PompeoE6 153 Relais Palazzo TavernaC3 154 Residenza ZanardelliD3 155 Teatropace 33D4 Centro Storico South Sights 1 Area Archeologica del Teatro di Marcello e del Portico d'OttaviaF2 2 Chiesa di San Bartolomeo E4 3 Chiesa di San Nicola in CarcereF3 4 Fontana del Mascherone A1 5 Fontana delle Tartarughe E1 6 Museo Ebraico di RomaE2 7 Palazzo Cenci D2 8 Ponte Rotto F4 9 Teatro di Marcello F2 Eating 10 Alberto Pica D2 11 Boccione E1 12 Giggetto 2 F2 13Giggetto al Portico d'OttaviaE2 14 La Dolceroma E2 15La Taverna degli AmiciF1 16 L'Arte del Pane E1 17 Piperno D2 18 Sora Lella E3 19 Sora Margherita E2 20 Vecchia Roma F1 21Vineria Roscioli SalumeriaD1 Drinking & Nightlife 22 Bartaruga E1 23 Open Baladin D1 Entertainment 24 Rialtosantambrogio E1 Shopping 25 Borini C1 26 Ethic D1 27 Leone Limentani E2 Sleeping 28 Casa BanzoC1 Centro Storico Eating | Drinking & Nightlife | Entertainment | Shopping Sights Bound by the River Tiber and Via del Corso, the (historic centre) is made for aimless wandering.

Don’t Miss… ➡ Fontana dei Quattro Fiumi ➡ Chiesa di Sant’Agnese in Agone ➡ Palazzo Pamphilj Practicalities ➡ Offline map ➡ Corso del Rinascimento Centro Storico North Top Sights Chiesa del GesùG6 Chiesa di San Luigi dei FrancesiE4 Museo Nazionale Romano: Palazzo AltempsE3 Palazzo e Galleria Doria PamphiljH5 Pantheon F4 Piazza Navona E4 Sights 1 Arco degli Acetari D6 2 Arco Farnese C7 3 Area Sacra F6 Basilica di San Lorenzo in Damaso (see 30) 4 Campo de' Fiori D6 5 Cat Sanctuary F7 6 Chiesa di San Giovanni Battista dei FiorentiniA4 7 Chiesa di San Lorenzo in LucinaG1 8 Chiesa di Santa Maria della Pace & Chiostro del Bramante D4 9 Chiesa di Santa Maria Sopra Minerva G5 10 Chiesa di Sant'Agnese in Agone D4 11 Chiesa di Sant'Agostino E3 12 Chiesa di Sant'Andrea della ValleE6 13 Chiesa di Sant'Eligio degli Orefici B6 14 Chiesa di Sant'Ignazio di LoyolaH4 15 Chiesa di Sant'lvo alla SapienzaE5 16 Chiesa Nuova C4 17 Colonna di Marco Aurelio H3 18 Elefantino F5 19 Fontana dei Quattro Fiumi E4 20 Fontana del Moro E5 21 Fontana del Nettuno E4 Galleria Spada (see 37) 22 Largo di Torre Argentina F6 23 Museo Barracco di Scultura AnticaD6 24 Museo Criminologico B5 25 Museo di Roma D5 26 Museo Nazionale Romano: Crypta BalbiG7 27 Obelisk G3 28 Oratorio dei Filippini C4 29 Palazzo Chigi H3 30 Palazzo della Cancelleria D5 31 Palazzo della Sapienza E5 32 Palazzo di MontecitorioG3 33 Palazzo Farnese C7 34 Palazzo MadamaE4 35 Palazzo Nardini C4 36 Palazzo PamphiljD5 37 Palazzo Spada D7 38 Pasquino D5 39 Piè di Marmo G5 40 Stadio di Domiziano D3 41 Tempio di Adriano G4 42 Torre dell'Orologio C4 Eating 43 Alfredo e Ada B4 44Antico Forno RoscioliE7 45 Armando Al Pantheon F4 46 Baffetto 2 D6 47 Campana E2 Campo de' Fiori (see 4) 48 Casa Bleve E5 49Casa CoppelleF3 Chiostro del Bramante Caffè(see 8) 50 Cul de Sac D5 51 Da Francesco C4 52 Da Tonino C4 53 Ditirambo D6 54 Enoteca Corsi G6 55 Filetti di Baccalà E7 56 Fiocco di Neve F4 57Forno di Campo de' FioriD6 58 Gelateria del Teatro C3 59 Gelateria Giolitti F3 60 Gino G2 61 Grappolo d'Oro D6 62 Green T G5 63II BacaroF3 64La Cantina di Ninco NancoF4 65 La Focaccia D4 66 La Rosetta F4 67 Les Affiches D5 68 Lilli D3 69 Lo Zozzone D4 70 Maccheroni F3 71 Matricianella G1 72 Obikà F2 73 Obikà D6 74 Osteria Ar Galletto D6 75 Osteria dell'Ingegno G4 76 Osteria Sostegno F4 77 Pizzeria al Leoncino G1 78 Pizzeria da Baffetto C5 79 Pizzeria la Montecarlo D5 80 Renato e Luisa F6 81 Ristorante Settimio F4 82Roman KitchenH5 83 San Crispino F4 84Sergio alla GrotteD7 85 Zazà E4 Drinking & Nightlife 86 Bar della Pace D4 87 Barnum Cafe C5 88 Caffè Farnese D6 89 Caffè Sant'Eustachio F5 90 Caffè Tazza d'Oro G4 91 Ciampini G1 92 Circus C4 93 Etablì C4 94 Femme D6 95 Gran Caffè la Caffettiera H4 96II GoccettoB5 97 La Maison D4 98 L'Angolo Divino D7 99 Salotto 42 G4 100 Vineria Reggio D6 Entertainment 101English Theatre of Rome at Teatro L'ArciliutoD4 102 Teatro Argentina F6 103 Teatro dell'Orologio C4 104 Teatro Valle E5 Shopping 105 Ai Monasteri E3 106 Al Sogno E3 107 Alberta Gloves G6 108 Aldo Fefè F3 109Anniable GamarelliF5 110 Arsenale C5 111 AS Roma Store H3 112 Bartolucci G4 113 Bertè E5 114 Casali B3 115 Città del Sole E3 116 Comics Bazar B5 117Confetteria Moriondo & GariglioG5 118 Cuadros Roma C4 119DaDADAD7 120 Davide Cenci F3 121 De Sanctis G4 122 Feltrinelli F6 123GhezziF6 124Ibiz - Artigianato in CuoioE7 125 Le Tele di Carlotta D3 126 Libreria del Viaggiatore C6 127 Loco D6 128 Luna & L'Altra D5 129 Mondello Ottica C5 130 Nardecchia D4 131 Officina Profumo Farmaceutica di Santa Maria Novella E4 132Omeri & CeciliaC5 133 Posto Italiano E7 134 Rachele D6 135 Retrò C4 136 Sciù Scià F5 137 Spazio Sette F7 138Statuaria – Arte SacraF5 139 Stilo Fetti G4 140 Tartarughe G5 141 Tempi Moderni C5 142 Vestiti Usati Cinzia C5 143 ZouZou D5 Sleeping 144 Albergo AbruzziF4 145 Albergo del SoleE6 146 Argentina ResidenzaF6 147 Casa di Santa BrigidaC6 148 Hotel Campo de' FioriD6 149 Hotel Due TorriE2 150 Hotel MimosaF5 151 Hotel NavonaE5 152 Hotel Teatro di PompeoE6 153 Relais Palazzo TavernaC3 154 Residenza ZanardelliD3 155 Teatropace 33D4 Centro Storico South Sights 1 Area Archeologica del Teatro di Marcello e del Portico d'OttaviaF2 2 Chiesa di San Bartolomeo E4 3 Chiesa di San Nicola in CarcereF3 4 Fontana del Mascherone A1 5 Fontana delle Tartarughe E1 6 Museo Ebraico di RomaE2 7 Palazzo Cenci D2 8 Ponte Rotto F4 9 Teatro di Marcello F2 Eating 10 Alberto Pica D2 11 Boccione E1 12 Giggetto 2 F2 13Giggetto al Portico d'OttaviaE2 14 La Dolceroma E2 15La Taverna degli AmiciF1 16 L'Arte del Pane E1 17 Piperno D2 18 Sora Lella E3 19 Sora Margherita E2 20 Vecchia Roma F1 21Vineria Roscioli SalumeriaD1 Drinking & Nightlife 22 Bartaruga E1 23 Open Baladin D1 Entertainment 24 Rialtosantambrogio E1 Shopping 25 Borini C1 26 Ethic D1 27 Leone Limentani E2 Sleeping 28 Casa BanzoC1 Centro Storico Eating | Drinking & Nightlife | Entertainment | Shopping Sights Bound by the River Tiber and Via del Corso, the (historic centre) is made for aimless wandering.

Don’t Miss… ➡ Facade mosaics ➡ 13th-century Cavallini mosaics in the apse ➡ Ancient Roman granite columns Practicalities ➡ Offline map ➡ 06 581 48 02 ➡ Piazza Santa Maria in Trastevere ➡ 7.30am-9pm ➡ or Viale di Trastevere Trastevere & Gianicolo Top Sights Basilica di Santa Cecilia in Trastevere H5 Basilica di Santa Maria in Trastevere E4 Villa Farnesina D2 Sights 1 Chiesa di San Francesco d'Assisi a RipaF6 2 Chiesa di San Pietro in MontorioD4 3 Elleffe F4 4 Fontana dell'Aqua PaolaC4 5 Galleria Nazionale d'Arte Antica di Palazzo CorsiniD2 6 Garibaldi MonumentB2 7 Museo di Roma in Trastevere E3 8 Orto Botanico D2 9 Piazza Santa Maria in TrastevereE4 10 Porta Settimiana D2 Tempietto di Bramante(see 2) 11 Villa Doria Pamphilj A5 Eating 12 Artigiano Innocenti G4 13 Bir & Fud E2 14 Da Augusto E3 15 Da Enzo H5 16 Da Lucia D3 17 Da Olindo D3 18 Dar Poeta E3 19 Fior di Luna F4 20 Forno la Renella F3 21 Glass Hostaria E3 22 La Botticella E3 23 La Gensola H4 24 Le Mani in Pasta H5 25 Panattoni G4 26 Paris F4 27 Piazza San CosimatoE5 28 Pizzeria Ivo F4 29 Sisini F5 30 Sora Mirella Caffè H4 31 Valzani F3 Drinking & Nightlife 32 Bar le Cinque E3 33 Bar San Calisto F4 34 Big Star D5 35 Freni e Frizioni E3 36 Gianicolo 150 B2 37 II BarettoD5 38 La Meschita E3 39 Libreria del Cinema F4 40 Ma Che Siete Venuti a Fà E2 41 Ombre Rosse E3 Entertainment 42 Alcazar F5 43 Anfiteatro del Tasso B1 44 Big Mama F6 45 Lettere Caffè Gallery F6 46 Nuovo Sacher F7 47 Teatro Vascello B7 Shopping 48 Almost Corner Bookshop E3 49 Bibli F4 50 La Cravatta su Misura H5 51 Officina della Carta E2 52 Porta Portese G7 53 Roma-Store F4 54 Scala Quattorodici E3 Sleeping Arco del Lauro(see 59) 55 Buonanotte GaribaldiD2 56 Donna Camilla SavelliD3 57 Hotel Santa MariaE3 58 La Foresteria Orsa MaggioreD1 59 Residenza Arco de' TolomeiH4 60 Residenza Santa MariaF4 61 Villa della FonteE3 Trastevere & Gianicolo Eating | Drinking & Nightlife | Entertainment | Shopping Sights Trastevere is dotted with exquisite churches, but some of its most wonderful sights are picturesque glimpses down narrow, ochre-and-orange-shaded lanes that will make you catch your breath.


pages: 162 words: 56,627

Top 10 Venice by Gillian Price

call centre, centre right, G4S, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Murano, Venice glass

Sottoportego Madonna Pope Alexander III took refuge here in 1177, in flight from Emperor Barbarossa. d Sant’ Aponal, S Polo • Map D3 Shrine @ Gondolier’s A 1583 Madonna greets boats approaching the bridge. d Ponte della Paglia, S Marco • Map R5 Nova £ Corte Painted images over a Venice’s Top 10 Designed by Longhena in 1630, it has a spacious, light-filled interior, while the altar houses a precious Byzantine icon. Dramatic works by Titian and Tintoretto can be appreciated in the sacristy. lace-trimmed mantlepiece. d Castello • Map G4 Passageway $ Covered The Virgin’s protection has been implored here against plague and enemy attacks. d Calle Zorzi, Castello • Map F4 Grande della % Scuola Misericordia Carvings of laden boats invoke protection for the ferries, which set out from here. d Cannaregio • Map D2 de Ca’ Sarasina ^ Corte Shrine dating back to the 1600s in memory of the dead. d Castello • Map H5 Anthony & St This 1668 “wardrobe” is full of fresh flower offerings.

F4 • Open Apr–Oct: 9:30am–12:30pm, 3:30–6:30pm Tue–Sun (closed public hols & Sun pm in winter) • Admission charge d Piazza Baldassare Galuppi, Burano • Map H1 • Open Apr–Oct: 10am–5pm; Nov–Mar: 10am–4pm Wed–Mon • Admission charge Storico Navale & Museo Watercraft galore are on display at this museum, but the highlight is the replica of the Doge’s ceremonial barge Bucintoro, richly decorated with allegorical statues. Venice’s Top 10 is the lacemaking island of Burano and this precious display of more than 200 rare lace items, documenting a 500-year history. d Calle dei Furlani, Castello 3259 • Map d Campo S Biagio, Castello 2148 • Map G4 • Open 8:45am–1:30pm Mon–Fri, (to 1pm Sat) • Admission charge Pesaro * Ca’ Galleria d’Arte Moderna Studio with a Fruit Bowl (1942), Raoul Dufy, Ca’ Pesaro A Baroque triumph of a palace whose interior, in contrast, accommodates works Museo dell’Istituto by leading European 19th- and Ellenico 20th- century masters such as A rich if small collection of Marc Chagall and Gustave Klimt. 14th–18th-century Byzantine d Fondamenta Ca’ Pesaro, S Croce icons is on display. ) d Ponte dei Greci, Castello 3412 • Map F4 • Open 9am–5pm daily (closed public hols) • Admission charge 2076 • Map N1 • Open 10am–5pm Tue–Sun (closed 1 Jan, 1 May, 25 Dec) • Admission charge 5$ $ &$032 6$1*,$&202 '(// 25,2 ,(6 &+ ' )0 12 &$03,(//2 '(/&$621 9$ &$032 '3(6&+(5,$ &$032 6$1 &$66,$12 &$032'(, 6$17,$32672/, 11 &$032 6$1 0$5,1$ 9$ &$032 6$132/2 9 6 * 5,9 $ / ' ( 9 ,1 6$/ ,2 82 9( 0XUDQR %XUDQR &$032 6*,867,1$ &032 60$5,$ )25026$ &$032' &(/(67,$ &DVWHOOR 58 5$ %( ,8 ) & )5 ( == 3,$==$ 6$ 10$5& 2 ( 5 ,$ ,0 $5 $1 1 , 1 ,$ &$032 6$19,'$/ &$032 '&$5,7$ *$ ; ;, $5 , %5 & / $5 $' $ % &$032 6$172 67()$12 6$/ ' * 5( ( , 6 $ / & , $ 1 72 6 $ ) 6DQ0DUFR &$032 6$1 )$17,1 ,$ )) (5 ,8 5& 63 &$032 6$1/8&$ &$032 0$1,1 * 0( *$ OEF &$032 6$17ŝ$1*(/2 'RUVRGXUR 1 / (, SB ( ' MF B OB & $ &$032 6$1%$51$%$ 6$ &$032 ')5$5, &$032 6 52&&2 &$032 6$1720$ 5* 1 &$0326$17, *,29$11, (3$2/2 ,2 6DQ3ROR &$032 6$167,1 7$ &$0326 0$5,$129$ , & '$ 338 && ,1( 67 & ' &$ &$032 6$167$( 6DQWD&URFH &$032 6$1=$&&$5,$ &$032 $56(1$/( =2 $BOB M F E J &$032 '(//$6$/87( &$032 %$1',(5$ (0252 5 , 9 $ '(*/, 6 & + , $ 9 2 1 , ZBSET NFUSFT 4BO &$032 6%,$*,2 .B SDP 41 Venice’s Top 10 Left Ca’ d’Oro Centre Ca’ Foscari Right Ca’ Dario Venice Palaces Palace !

d Ruga Giuffa, Castello 4920 • Map F3 @ A normal grocery store at Pastificio Le Spighe first sight, this hive of industry produces a marvellous range of homemade pasta and stocks gourmet olive oils and olive paste. delle Fate * Corte Ultra-modern footwear and zany accessories in the shape of bags, jewellery and garments for the young. d Salizzada S Lio, Castello d Via Garibaldi, Castello 1341 • Map G4 5690 • Map E3 Mâché £ Papier One of the few authentic Magica ( Lanterna A toy and gadget shop where mask shops in town. It also sells beautiful ceramics. d Calle Lunga Santa Maria Formosa, Castello 5175 • Map R3 you can browse among starstudded umbrellas and “magic lantern” lamps with a procession of shadow figures. d Calle delle Bande, Castello 5379 • Map E3 $ Tempting gifts in the shape Il Papiro of marbled paper-covered boxes, greeting cards and writing paper with artistic letterheads. d Calle delle Bande, Castello 5275 • Map E4 % Inviting boudoir filled with an Anticlea Antiquariato Zanella ) Giovanna A must for all serious shoppers – zany handmade shoes in a fabulous range of incredible designs.


The Art of Computer Programming: Fundamental Algorithms by Donald E. Knuth

discrete time, distributed generation, Donald Knuth, fear of failure, Fermat's Last Theorem, G4S, Gerard Salton, Isaac Newton, Jacquard loom, Johannes Kepler, John von Neumann, linear programming, linked data, Menlo Park, probability theory / Blaise Pascal / Pierre de Fermat, sorting algorithm, stochastic process, Turing machine

Consider representing the Data Table in sequential locations with just two links for each item: PREV (as in the text); SCOPE (a link to the last elementary item in this group). We have SCOPE(P) = P if and only if NODE(P) represents an elementary item. For example, the Data Table of E) would be replaced by PREV SCOPE PREV SCOPE PREV SCOPE Al: A G4 F3: A G4 B5: B3 B5 B3: A D7 G4: A G4 C5: C7 G9 C7: A C7 HI: A G9 E9: E3 E9 D7: A D7 F5: F3 G8 D9: D7 D9 E3: A E3 G8: G4 G8 G9: G8 G9 (Compare with E) of Section 2.3.3.) Notice that NODE(P) is part of the tree below NODE(Q) if and only if Q < P < SCOPE(Q). Design an algorithm that performs the function of Algorithm B when the Data Table has this format. > 13. [24] Give an algorithm to substitute for Algorithm A when the Data Table is to have the format shown in exercise 12. > 14. [28] Give an algorithm to substitute for Algorithm C when the Data Table has the format shown in exercise 12. 15. [25] (David S.

Note the flexibility in choice of level numbers that is allowed by the COBOL rules; the left structure in D) is completely equivalent to 1 A 2 B 3 C 3 D 2 E 2 F 3 G because level numbers do not have to be sequential. 428 INFORMATION STRUCTURES 2.4 Symbol Table LINK Data Table PREV PARENT NAME CHILD SIB A: B: C: D: E: F: G: H: Al B5 C5 D9 E9 F5 G9 HI Empty boxes indicate additional information not relevant here A A A A A A A A F3 G4 B3 C7 E3 D7 G8 A Al B3 B3 Al Al F3 A HI F5 HI HI C5 C5 C5 A B C D E F G H F G B C E D G B3 C7 A A A G4 A F5 G8 A A E9 A A A HI E3 D7 A F3 A A A B5 A C5 A D9 G9 A E) Al: B3? C7: D7: E3: F3: G4: HI: F5: G8: C5: E9: D9: G9: Some sequences of level numbers are illegal, however; for example, if the level number of D in D) were changed to " (in either place) we would have a meaningless data configuration, violating the rule that all items of a group must have the same number. The following algorithm therefore makes sure that COBOL's rule (a) has not been broken.

Wegbreit, Comp. J. 15 A972), 204-208; D. A. Zave, Inf. Proc. Letters 3 A975), 167-169. Cohen and Nicolau have analyzed four of these approaches in ACM Trans. Prog. Languages and Systems 5 A983), 532-553.] 34. Let TOP = rll, Q = rI2, P = rI3, k = rI4, SIZE(P) = rI5. Assume further that A = 0, and LINK(O) ^ 0 to simplify step G4. Step Gl is omitted. 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 U 15 16 11 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 21 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 31 38 LINK INFO SIZE T G2 G3 G4 1H G5 1H G6 G6A G8 EQU EQU EQU EQU LD1 LD2 ST2 STZ ENT3 LD1 J1Z LD4 J4Z INC3 DEC4 LD2 LDA JANZ ST1 ENT1 JMP ENT2 ST2 ENT3 JMP ST2 INC2 INC3 LDA LD5 JAZ J5NZ LD1 LDA STA ST2 ENT3 JMP 4:5 0:3 1:2 3:3 USE AVAIL 0,1(LINK) 0,2(LINK) 0,1 0,1(LINK) G5 0,3(T) G3 1 1 0,3(LINK) 0,2(LINK) IB 0,2(LINK) 0,2 IB 1 0,3 1 G6 0,3(LINK) 0,5 0,5 0,3(LINK) 0,3(SIZE) G7 IB USE 0,1(LINK) USE AVAIL 1 G8P a a a a a a a a a + a + a 1 1 1 1 + + + a + b b b b b — — — 1 1 1 1 a a a + c c + 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 b 1 1 1 1 + 1 + 1 1 G2.


San Francisco by Lonely Planet

airport security, Albert Einstein, Apple II, back-to-the-land, banking crisis, Bay Area Rapid Transit, Burning Man, California gold rush, car-free, carbon footprint, centre right, Chuck Templeton: OpenTable:, David Brooks, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, G4S, game design, glass ceiling, Golden Gate Park, Haight Ashbury, Joan Didion, Loma Prieta earthquake, Mason jar, New Urbanism, Silicon Valley, South of Market, San Francisco, stealth mode startup, stem cell, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Stewart Brand, transcontinental railway, urban sprawl, Whole Earth Catalog, Zipcar

Pedal boats, row boats and bikes are available at the 1946 boathouse ( 415-752-0347; per hr paddleboats/canoes/rowboats $24/20/19, tandem bikes $15, bikes $8; rentals 10am-4pm) . Golden Gate Park & The Avenues Top Sights California Academy of Sciences G4 Conservatory of Flowers H4 Golden Gate Park E4 Japanese Tea Garden F4 MH de Young Museum G4 San Francisco Botanical Garden F5 Stow Lake F4 Sights 1 AIDS Memorial Grove H4 2 Bison PaddockC4 3 Camera Obscura A3 4 Children's Playground H4 Cliff House(see 3) 5 Columbarium H3 6 Dahlia Garden H4 7 Legion of Honor B2 8 Lincoln Park B1 9 McLaren Lodge H4 10 Ocean Beach A5 11 Shakespeare Garden G4 12 Sutro Baths A2 13 Windmills A4 Eating 14 AzizaE2 15 B Star Bar H2 16 Burma Superstar G2 17 First Korean Market G2 18 Genki G2 19 Halu G2 20 House of Bagels F2 21 Kabuto F2 22 NamuG3 23 Nanking Road Bistro G5 Outerlands (see 38) 24 PPQ Dungeness Island E2 25 San Tung G5 26 Spices G2 27 Sunrise Deli E5 28 Thanh Long B6 29 Ton Kiang Restaurant E2 30 Underdog F5 31 Wing Lee G2 32 Yum Yum Fish E5 Drinking & Nightlife 540 Club (see 31) 33 Beach ChaletA4 34 Bitter End G2 35 Hollow F5 36 Social G5 37 Trad'r Sam's D2 38 Trouble CoffeeB6 Entertainment 39 Balboa Theater C3 40 Plough & the Stars H2 Shopping General Store (see 38) 41 Green Apple Books G2 42 Mollusk B5 Park Life(see 40) Seedstore (see 18) 43 Wishbone G5 Sports & Activities 44 Circus Center Trapeze H5 45 Flycasting Club C4 46 Golden Gate Municipal Golf Course B4 47 Golden Gate Park Bike & Skate G3 48 Lawn Bowling Club H4 49 Lincoln Park Golf Course C2 50 Lindy in the ParkG4 51 San Francisco Disc GolfD4 52 San Francisco Model Yacht ClubC4 53 Wheel Fun Rentals F4 Sleeping 54Seal Rock InnA3 Golden Gate Park & the Avenues Eating | Drinking & Nightlife | Entertainment | Shopping | Sports & Activities Sights Populist millionaire Adolph Sutro built a public railway in the 1890s to transport Downtown tenement-dwellers to breezy Ocean Beach.

Don’t Miss… ➡ Balmy Alley ➡ Clarion Alley ➡ Maestrapeace ➡ Chris Ware’s mural at 826 Valencia ➡ Digital Mural Project at Galería de la Raza Practicalities ➡ Offline map ➡ 24th St btwn Mission & Potrero; Valencia St btwn 17th & 20th Sts ➡ admission free ➡ 24th St Mission or 16th St Mission The Mission & Potrero Hill Top Sights 24th StD5 Valencia StB3 Sights 1 826 Valencia B3 2 Ampersand International ArtsH3 3 Balmy Alley C5 4 California College of the ArtsF1 5 Clarion Alley B2 6 Creativity Explored A2 7 Eleanor Harwood GalleryD5 8 Galería de la Raza D5 9 Guerrero GalleryD3 10 Incline GalleryB3 11 Mission Dolores A2 12 Mission Dolores Park A3 13 Ratio 3 B1 14 Root DivisionC2 15 Southern Exposure D3 16 Women's Building B3 Eating 17 Bi-Rite A3 18 Bi-Rite Creamery A3 19CommonwealthB3 20 Corner B2 21DelfinaA3 22 Duc Loi B3 23 Foreign Cinema B4 24 Humphry Slocombe D5 25 Ichi Sushi B7 26La TaqueriaB5 27 Locanda B2 28MaverickB2 29Mission Beach CafeA1 30Mission ChineseB3 31Mission PieB5 32 Mitchell's Ice Cream B7 33 Mr & Mrs Miscellaneous H4 34Mr PolloB5 35 Old Jerusalem B6 36 Pancho Villa B2 Range (see 87) 37 Tartine A3 38 Udupi Palace B4 Drinking & Nightlife 39 Atlas Cafe D3 40 Beretta B4 41 Borderlands B3 42 Doc's Clock B4 43 El Rio B6 44ElixirB2 45 Heart B5 46 Homestead C3 47 Latin American Club B4 48 Lexington Club B3 49 Medjool Sky Terrace B4 50 Mighty E1 51 Phone Booth C4 52 Ritual Coffee Roasters B4 53 Thee Parkside F2 54 Truck C1 Entertainment 55 Amnesia B3 56 Bottom of the Hill F2 57 Brava Theater D5 58 Cafe Cocomo G2 59 Dance Mission B5 60 Elbo Room B3 61Intersection for the ArtsB2 62 Jewish Theater D2 63 Little Baobab B3 64 Make-Out Room B4 65 Marsh B4 66Oberlin Dance CollectiveC2 67 Red Poppy Art House C4 68 Roccapulco Supper Club B6 69Roxie CinemaB2 70 Savanna Jazz B5 71 SUB-Mission B2 72 Verdi Club D2 Shopping 73 Accident & Artifact B1 74Adobe Books & Backroom GalleryA2 75 Aquarius Records B4 76 Black & Blue Tattoo A2 77Candystore CollectiveA2 78 Community Thrift B2 79 Dema B4 80 Fabric8 B4 81 Good Vibrations B2 82Gravel & GoldB4 83Mission SkateboardsC5 84 Mission Statement B3 85 Needles & Pens A2 86 NooWorks B1 87 Paxton Gate B3 88 Room 4 B3 89SCRAPF7 90 Sunhee Moon A2 91 Voyager B1 Sports & Activities 92 18 Reasons A3 93Bakar Fitness & Recreation CenterG1 94 Metronome Dance Collective E2 95Mission Cultural Center for Latino ArtsB5 96Potrero del Sol/La Raza SkateparkE5 97San Francisco Center for the BookE2 98 Yoga Tree B5 Sleeping 99Inn San FranciscoC3 SoMa Top Sights San Francisco Museum of Modern ArtF3 Sights 1 AT&T ParkH5 Baer Ridgway(see 3) 2 California Historical Society Museum E3 3 Cartoon Art Museum E3 4 Catharine Clark GalleryF3 5 Children's Creativity Museum E3 6 Contemporary Jewish MuseumE3 7 Crown Point PressF3 8 Electric WorksC5 9 Federal Building C5 10 Jack London's BirthplaceG4 11 Museum of Craft & Folk Art E3 12 Museum of the African DiasporaE3 13 South Park G4 14 WPA Murals at Rincon Annex Post OfficeG1 Yerba Buena Centre for the Arts(see 15) 15 Yerba Buena Gardens E3 Eating 16BenuF3 17 Boulevard G1 18 Butler & the Chef G4 Citizen's Band(see 32) 19 Heaven's Dog C5 20 Juhu Beach Club C6 21 Rainbow Grocery C7 22 Sentinel E2 23 Split Pea Seduction D4 24 Tropisueño E3 25 Tu Lan D4 26 Zero Zero E4 Drinking & Nightlife 27 1015 Folsom D5 28 111 Minna F2 29 83 Proof F2 Bar Agricole(see 36) 30BloodhoundD6 31 Butter C7 32 Cat Club D6 33 City Beer Store & Tasting Room D5 34 Club Six D4 35 Dada F2 36 DNA Lounge C7 37 EndUp E5 38 Harlot F2 39 Hole in the Wall C6 40 House of Shields E2 41 Kok Bar C6 42 Lone Star Saloon C6 43 Powerhouse C6 44 RN74 F1 45 Shine C6 46 Sightglass Coffee D5 47 Stud D6 48TempleF2 49Terroir Natural Wine MerchantD5 50 Waterbar H2 51ZeitgeistA7 Entertainment 52 AMC Loews Metreon 16 E3 53 AsiaSF C6 54 Blow Buddies E5 55 Brainwash D5 56 Hotel Utah Saloon F4 57 Mezzanine D4 58 Slim's C7 Shopping 59BranchD6 60 Gama-Go D6 61 General Bead C5 62 Goodwill 'As Is' Shop B6 63 Isda & Co Outlet G4 64 Jeremy's G4 65Madame S & Mr S LeatherD6 66 San Francisco Flower Mart E6 67 SFMOMA Museum Store E3 Sports & Activities 68 City Kayak H4 69 Embarcadero YMCA G1 Spinnaker Sailing (see 68) 70Yerba Buena Ice Skating & BowlingF3 Sleeping 71Americania HotelD5 72Best Western Carriage InnD5 73Good HotelC5 74Harbor Court HotelG1 75Hotel VitaleG1 76Mosser HotelE3 77St Regis HotelE3 78W HotelF3 The Mission, SoMa & Potrero Hill Eating | Drinking & Nightlife | Entertainment | Shopping | Sports & Activities Sights The Mission is a crossroads of contradictions, and at its heart is Mission St, San Francisco’s faded ‘miracle mile’ of deco cinemas now occupied by 99¢ stores and shady characters, surrounded by colorful murals and trend-setting restaurants.

Don’t Miss… ➡ Balmy Alley ➡ Clarion Alley ➡ Maestrapeace ➡ Chris Ware’s mural at 826 Valencia ➡ Digital Mural Project at Galería de la Raza Practicalities ➡ Offline map ➡ 24th St btwn Mission & Potrero; Valencia St btwn 17th & 20th Sts ➡ admission free ➡ 24th St Mission or 16th St Mission The Mission & Potrero Hill Top Sights 24th StD5 Valencia StB3 Sights 1 826 Valencia B3 2 Ampersand International ArtsH3 3 Balmy Alley C5 4 California College of the ArtsF1 5 Clarion Alley B2 6 Creativity Explored A2 7 Eleanor Harwood GalleryD5 8 Galería de la Raza D5 9 Guerrero GalleryD3 10 Incline GalleryB3 11 Mission Dolores A2 12 Mission Dolores Park A3 13 Ratio 3 B1 14 Root DivisionC2 15 Southern Exposure D3 16 Women's Building B3 Eating 17 Bi-Rite A3 18 Bi-Rite Creamery A3 19CommonwealthB3 20 Corner B2 21DelfinaA3 22 Duc Loi B3 23 Foreign Cinema B4 24 Humphry Slocombe D5 25 Ichi Sushi B7 26La TaqueriaB5 27 Locanda B2 28MaverickB2 29Mission Beach CafeA1 30Mission ChineseB3 31Mission PieB5 32 Mitchell's Ice Cream B7 33 Mr & Mrs Miscellaneous H4 34Mr PolloB5 35 Old Jerusalem B6 36 Pancho Villa B2 Range (see 87) 37 Tartine A3 38 Udupi Palace B4 Drinking & Nightlife 39 Atlas Cafe D3 40 Beretta B4 41 Borderlands B3 42 Doc's Clock B4 43 El Rio B6 44ElixirB2 45 Heart B5 46 Homestead C3 47 Latin American Club B4 48 Lexington Club B3 49 Medjool Sky Terrace B4 50 Mighty E1 51 Phone Booth C4 52 Ritual Coffee Roasters B4 53 Thee Parkside F2 54 Truck C1 Entertainment 55 Amnesia B3 56 Bottom of the Hill F2 57 Brava Theater D5 58 Cafe Cocomo G2 59 Dance Mission B5 60 Elbo Room B3 61Intersection for the ArtsB2 62 Jewish Theater D2 63 Little Baobab B3 64 Make-Out Room B4 65 Marsh B4 66Oberlin Dance CollectiveC2 67 Red Poppy Art House C4 68 Roccapulco Supper Club B6 69Roxie CinemaB2 70 Savanna Jazz B5 71 SUB-Mission B2 72 Verdi Club D2 Shopping 73 Accident & Artifact B1 74Adobe Books & Backroom GalleryA2 75 Aquarius Records B4 76 Black & Blue Tattoo A2 77Candystore CollectiveA2 78 Community Thrift B2 79 Dema B4 80 Fabric8 B4 81 Good Vibrations B2 82Gravel & GoldB4 83Mission SkateboardsC5 84 Mission Statement B3 85 Needles & Pens A2 86 NooWorks B1 87 Paxton Gate B3 88 Room 4 B3 89SCRAPF7 90 Sunhee Moon A2 91 Voyager B1 Sports & Activities 92 18 Reasons A3 93Bakar Fitness & Recreation CenterG1 94 Metronome Dance Collective E2 95Mission Cultural Center for Latino ArtsB5 96Potrero del Sol/La Raza SkateparkE5 97San Francisco Center for the BookE2 98 Yoga Tree B5 Sleeping 99Inn San FranciscoC3 SoMa Top Sights San Francisco Museum of Modern ArtF3 Sights 1 AT&T ParkH5 Baer Ridgway(see 3) 2 California Historical Society Museum E3 3 Cartoon Art Museum E3 4 Catharine Clark GalleryF3 5 Children's Creativity Museum E3 6 Contemporary Jewish MuseumE3 7 Crown Point PressF3 8 Electric WorksC5 9 Federal Building C5 10 Jack London's BirthplaceG4 11 Museum of Craft & Folk Art E3 12 Museum of the African DiasporaE3 13 South Park G4 14 WPA Murals at Rincon Annex Post OfficeG1 Yerba Buena Centre for the Arts(see 15) 15 Yerba Buena Gardens E3 Eating 16BenuF3 17 Boulevard G1 18 Butler & the Chef G4 Citizen's Band(see 32) 19 Heaven's Dog C5 20 Juhu Beach Club C6 21 Rainbow Grocery C7 22 Sentinel E2 23 Split Pea Seduction D4 24 Tropisueño E3 25 Tu Lan D4 26 Zero Zero E4 Drinking & Nightlife 27 1015 Folsom D5 28 111 Minna F2 29 83 Proof F2 Bar Agricole(see 36) 30BloodhoundD6 31 Butter C7 32 Cat Club D6 33 City Beer Store & Tasting Room D5 34 Club Six D4 35 Dada F2 36 DNA Lounge C7 37 EndUp E5 38 Harlot F2 39 Hole in the Wall C6 40 House of Shields E2 41 Kok Bar C6 42 Lone Star Saloon C6 43 Powerhouse C6 44 RN74 F1 45 Shine C6 46 Sightglass Coffee D5 47 Stud D6 48TempleF2 49Terroir Natural Wine MerchantD5 50 Waterbar H2 51ZeitgeistA7 Entertainment 52 AMC Loews Metreon 16 E3 53 AsiaSF C6 54 Blow Buddies E5 55 Brainwash D5 56 Hotel Utah Saloon F4 57 Mezzanine D4 58 Slim's C7 Shopping 59BranchD6 60 Gama-Go D6 61 General Bead C5 62 Goodwill 'As Is' Shop B6 63 Isda & Co Outlet G4 64 Jeremy's G4 65Madame S & Mr S LeatherD6 66 San Francisco Flower Mart E6 67 SFMOMA Museum Store E3 Sports & Activities 68 City Kayak H4 69 Embarcadero YMCA G1 Spinnaker Sailing (see 68) 70Yerba Buena Ice Skating & BowlingF3 Sleeping 71Americania HotelD5 72Best Western Carriage InnD5 73Good HotelC5 74Harbor Court HotelG1 75Hotel VitaleG1 76Mosser HotelE3 77St Regis HotelE3 78W HotelF3 The Mission, SoMa & Potrero Hill Eating | Drinking & Nightlife | Entertainment | Shopping | Sports & Activities Sights The Mission is a crossroads of contradictions, and at its heart is Mission St, San Francisco’s faded ‘miracle mile’ of deco cinemas now occupied by 99¢ stores and shady characters, surrounded by colorful murals and trend-setting restaurants.


Discover Great Britain by Lonely Planet

British Empire, carbon footprint, centre right, colonial rule, Columbine, congestion charging, G4S, global village, Haight Ashbury, Isaac Newton, James Watt: steam engine, New Urbanism, Stephen Hawking

Big Ben, clock tower of the Houses of Parliament PHOTOGRAPHER: DAVID TOMLINSON / LONELY PLANET IMAGES © London Telephone code 020 / pop 7.51 million / area 609 sq miles Central London Top Sights Big Ben E6 Buckingham Palace A6 Houses of Parliament E7 London EyeF5 National GalleryD4 National Portrait GalleryD3 Trafalgar Square D4 Westminster Abbey D7 Sights 1 Churchill Museum & Cabinet War Rooms D6 2 Covent Garden E2 3 Nelson's Column D4 4Royal MewsA7 5 Sea Life F6 Sleeping 6 Brown's Hotel A3 7 Hazlitt's C2 Eating 8 Arbutus C1 9 Fernandez & Wells B2 10 Great Queen Street E1 11 HK Diner C3 12 National Dining Rooms D4 13 Sacred B2 14 Sacred E2 15 Veeraswamy B3 Drinking 16 Candy Bar C1 17 Friendly Society C2 18 G-A-Y BarC2 19G-A-Y LateD1 20 Gordon's Wine Bar E4 21 Jewel Covent GardenE3 22Jewel Piccadilly CircusC3 23 Lamb & Flag E2 24 Village C2 Entertainment 25 Donmar Warehouse E2 26G-A-Y Club @ HeavenE4 27 National Theatre G4 28 Old Vic H6 Purcell Room (see 29) 29 Queen Elizabeth Hall G4 30 Ronnie Scott's C2 31 Royal Festival Hall G4 32 Royal Opera House E2 33 Southbank Centre G4 34 tkts D3 Shopping 35 Fortnum & Mason B4 36 HMV B1 37 Liberty B2 38 Topshop Oxford Circus A1 Sights Westminster & St James’s Purposefully positioned outside the old City (London’s fiercely independent burghers preferred to keep the monarch and parliament at arm’s length), Westminster has been the centre of the nation’s political power for nearly a millennium.

Kensington High St has a lively mix of chains and boutiques. Hyde Park & Kensington Top Sights Natural History MuseumE3 Science MuseumE3 Victoria & Albert MuseumE3 Sights 1 Diana, Princess of Wales Memorial Fountain E2 2 Hyde Park E2 3 Speaker's Corner F1 4 Westminster Cathedral G3 Sleeping 5 B&B Belgravia G3 6 Gore E3 7 Lime Tree Hotel G3 8 Luna Simone Hotel G4 9 Vicarage Private Hotel D2 10 Windermere Hotel G4 Eating 11 Gordon Ramsay F4 12 Locanda Locatelli F1 13 Made in Italy E4 14 Tom's Kitchen E4 15 Wild Honey G1 Drinking 16 Galvin at Windows G2 Entertainment 17 Royal Albert Hall E3 18 Royal Court Theatre F3 Shopping 19 Gray'sG1 20 Harrods F3 21 Harvey Nichols F2 22 Portobello Road Market C1 23 Selfridges F1 Victoria & Albert Museum Museum Offline map Google map (V&A; ; www.vam.ac.uk; Cromwell Rd SW7; 10am-5.45pm Sat-Thu, to 10pm Fri; South Kensington) A vast, rambling and wonderful museum of decorative art and design, the V&A is part of Prince Albert’s legacy to Londoners in the wake of the Great Exhibition.

Oxford Top Sights Ashmolean MuseumC2 Bodleian Library D3 Christ Church CollegeD4 Magdalen College F3 Radcliffe Camera D3 Sheldonian Theatre D2 Sights 1All Souls CollegeD3 2Brasenose CollegeD3 3Bridge of SighsD2 4 Christ Church CathedralD4 5Corpus Christi CollegeD4 6 Exeter CollegeD3 7 Merton College E3 8 New College E2 9Oxford Castle UnlockedC3 10 Oxford Covered Market D3 11St Edmund HallE3 12Trinity CollegeD2 13University Church of St Mary the VirginD3 Activities, Courses & Tours 14 Blackwell D2 Sleeping 15 Buttery Hotel C3 16 Old Parsonage Hotel C1 Eating 17 Door 74 G4 18 Georgina's D3 19 Jericho Café B1 20 Quod D3 Vaults (see 13) Drinking 21 Eagle & Child C2 22 Raoul’s C1 23 Turf Tavern D2 Sights Magdalen College College Offline map Google map (www.magd.ox.ac.uk; High St; adult/child £4.50/3.50; 1-6pm) Set amid 40 hectares of lawns, woodlands, river walks and deer park, Magdalen ( mawd -len) is one of the wealthiest and most beautiful of Oxford’s colleges.


pages: 457 words: 125,329

Value of Everything: An Antidote to Chaos The by Mariana Mazzucato

"Robert Solow", activist fund / activist shareholder / activist investor, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Airbnb, bank run, banks create money, Basel III, Berlin Wall, Big bang: deregulation of the City of London, bonus culture, Bretton Woods, business cycle, butterfly effect, buy and hold, Buy land – they’re not making it any more, capital controls, Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty, Carmen Reinhart, carried interest, cleantech, Corn Laws, corporate governance, corporate social responsibility, creative destruction, Credit Default Swap, David Ricardo: comparative advantage, debt deflation, European colonialism, fear of failure, financial deregulation, financial innovation, Financial Instability Hypothesis, financial intermediation, financial repression, full employment, G4S, George Akerlof, Google Hangouts, Growth in a Time of Debt, high net worth, Hyman Minsky, income inequality, index fund, informal economy, interest rate derivative, Internet of things, invisible hand, Joseph Schumpeter, Kenneth Arrow, Kenneth Rogoff, knowledge economy, labour market flexibility, laissez-faire capitalism, light touch regulation, liquidity trap, London Interbank Offered Rate, margin call, Mark Zuckerberg, market bubble, means of production, money market fund, negative equity, Network effects, new economy, Northern Rock, obamacare, offshore financial centre, Pareto efficiency, patent troll, Paul Samuelson, peer-to-peer lending, Peter Thiel, profit maximization, quantitative easing, quantitative trading / quantitative finance, QWERTY keyboard, rent control, rent-seeking, Sand Hill Road, shareholder value, sharing economy, short selling, Silicon Valley, Simon Kuznets, smart meter, Social Responsibility of Business Is to Increase Its Profits, software patent, stem cell, Steve Jobs, The Great Moderation, The Spirit Level, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thomas Malthus, Tobin tax, too big to fail, trade route, transaction costs, two-sided market, very high income, Vilfredo Pareto, wealth creators, Works Progress Administration, zero-sum game

Social Enterprise UK, which promotes organizations such as the Big Issue, Cafedirect and the Eden Project, has referred to the oligopoly of outsourcing providers as the ‘Shadow State'. Capita, G4S and Serco continue to win contracts in both the UK and US, even though they have all been fined for improper management.60 In 2016, for example, an investigative article revealed that G4S has been fined for at least 100 breaches of prison contracts between 2010 and 2016, including ‘failure to achieve search targets, smuggling of contraband items, failure of security procedures, serious cases of “concerted indiscipline”, hostage taking, and roof climbing. Other cases include failure to lock doors, poor hygiene and a reduction in staffing levels.'61 The fines, however, are minuscule in proportion to the profits made by both Serco and G4S - and such companies, rather than being penalized for carelessness and reckless cost-cutting, are being rewarded with more contracts.

., Principles of Economics (1890; London: Macmillan, 1920). Marx, K., Theories of Surplus Value (vol. 4 of Capital), Part I (Moscow: Progress Publishers, 1863). Marx, K., Capital, vol. 1 (London: Penguin Classics, 2004). Marx, K., Capital, vol. 3 (London: Penguin Classics, 1992). Marx, K. and Engels, F., The Communist Manifesto (1848; London: Penguin Classics, 2010). Mason, R., ‘G4S fined 100 times since 2010 for breaching prison contracts', the Guardian, 15 April 2016: https://www.theguardian.com/society/2016/apr/15/g4s-fined-100-times- since-2010-prison-contracts Mazzoleni, R. and Nelson, R., ‘The benefit and costs of strong patent protection: A contribution to the current debate', Research Policy, 27 (1998), pp. 273-84. Mazzucato, M., The Entrepreneurial State: Debunking Public vs. Private Sector Myths (London: Anthem Press, 2013). Mazzucato, M., ‘From market-fixing to market-creating: A new framework for innovation policy', special issue of Industry and Innovation: ‘Innovation policy - Can it make a difference?'

Turning to PFIs in this way has been called ‘pseudoprivatization', because the private firms receive their income not from clients in the ‘market' but from government through a guaranteed profit margin. An outsourcing contract is in effect a type of monopoly which locks the government in as the sole customer. In the UK, moreover, the degree of competition between providers of outsourcing services is questionable: only a handful, dominated by Capita, G4S and Serco, account for most the contracts.44 The aim of PFI financing is to share costs and remove from the government's balance sheet the debt associated with large projects such as hospitals; however, it can be costly for the public sector because projects are financed with private debt and equity, which is significantly more expensive than public borrowing. Governments also pay private contractors an annual charge, running for decades and usually indexed to inflation, to cover the capital repayment plus interest and maintenance costs.


pages: 315 words: 70,044

Learning SPARQL by Bob Ducharme

database schema, Donald Knuth, en.wikipedia.org, G4S, linked data, semantic web, SPARQL, web application

It then inserts copies of these triples into a new d:g4 graph. # filename: ex344.ru PREFIX d: <http://learningsparql.com/ns/data#> PREFIX dm: <http://learningsparql.com/ns/demo#> INSERT { GRAPH d:g4 { ?s dm:tag "five", "six" . } } USING d:g2 WHERE { ?s dm:tag "five" . ?s dm:tag "six" . } After running it, run the ex332.rq List All Triples SELECT query, and you’ll see that the two triples inserted into graph d:g4 both have subjects of d:x. Although the default graph has triples that match the WHERE clause’s patterns (the ones that you inserted with update request ex343.ru), the USING keyword specifically tells the SPARQL processor to look in the d:g2 graph for triples that match those patterns, so those are the ones that got copied to d:g4. If the USING keyword in an update request is like FROM in a SELECT query, then USING NAMED is like FROM NAMED: it specifies a graph that will be referenced by name.

If the USING keyword in an update request is like FROM in a SELECT query, then USING NAMED is like FROM NAMED: it specifies a graph that will be referenced by name. If the ex344.ru graph had said USING NAMED instead of just USING, the query processor wouldn’t have found those triples in the d:g2 graph unless the name was explicitly included in the WHERE clause, like this: # filename: ex345.ru PREFIX d: <http://learningsparql.com/ns/data#> PREFIX dm: <http://learningsparql.com/ns/demo#> WITH d:g4 INSERT { ?s dm:tag "five" . ?s dm:tag "six" . } USING NAMED d:g2 WHERE { GRAPH d:g2 { ?s dm:tag "five" . ?s dm:tag "six" . } } Deleting and Replacing Triples in Named Graphs Before trying some queries that delete triples from specific graphs, run the DROP ALL update request (ex337.ru) to clear out the dataset, run the ex338.ru update request that adds triples to two new graphs and the default graph, and then run the ex332.rq List All Triples SELECT query to review the data that you’re about to delete from.


Cuba Travel Guide by Lonely Planet

Bartolomé de las Casas, battle of ideas, business climate, car-free, carbon footprint, cuban missile crisis, G4S, glass ceiling, haute cuisine, Hernando de Soto, Kickstarter, Monroe Doctrine, new economy, ride hailing / ride sharing, Ronald Reagan, transatlantic slave trade, transcontinental railway, transfer pricing, urban planning

Centro Habana Top Sights 1 Malecón F2 Sights 2Asociación Cultural Yoruba de CubaG6 3 Capitolio Nacional G5 4 Castillo de San Salvador de la Punta H1 5 Escuela Nacional de Ballet G3 6 Fuente de la India G6 7 Gran Teatro de la Habana G5 8 Hotel Inglaterra G5 9Iglesia del Sagrado Corazón de JesúsD7 10 Memorial a los Estudiantes de Medicina H2 11 Monumento a Antonio Maceo B3 12 Museo Lezama Lima G3 13 Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes (Arte Universal) G5 14 Palacio de los Matrimonios G4 15 Palacio Velasco H2 16 Parque Central Around G5 17 Parque de la Fraternidad G6 18 Parque de los Enamorados G2 19 Real Fábrica de Tabacos Partagás G6 20 Statue of General Máximo Gómez H2 21 Statue of José Martí G5 22 Teatro Fausto G3 23 Torreón de San Lázaro B3 Activities, Courses Tours 24 Centro Andaluz G4 25Centro Hispano Americano de CulturaG2 26 Teatro América F4 Sleeping 27 Casa 1932 E3 28 Casa 1940 E3 29 Casa Amada D4 30 Casa de Lourdes José F3 31Dulce Hostal – Dulce María GonzálezF5 32 Esther Cardoso F4 33 Eumelia Aurelio G3 34 Hostal Peregrino G3 35 Hotel Caribbean G3 36 Hotel Deauville F3 37Hotel Iberostar Parque CentralG4 Hotel Inglaterra (see 8) 38 Hotel Lincoln F4 39 Hotel Park View G3 40 Hotel Saratoga G6 41 Hotel Sevilla G3 42 Hotel Telégrafo G4 43 Hotel Terral D3 44 Lourdes Cervantes A3 Eating 45 Almacenes Ultra F6 46 Café Neruda E3 47 Casa Miglis D4 48 Castropol F2 49 Chi Tack Tong E6 50 Flor de Loto D6 51 Infanta Cafetería A2 52 La Época F4 53 Los Gijones G4 54 Los Nardos G6 55 Paladar la Guarida D4 56 Pastelería Francesa G4 57 Restaurante Tien-Tan E6 58 San Cristóbal E5 59 Supermercado Isla de Cuba G7 Drinking Nightlife 60 Prado Animas G4 61 Prado No 12 G2 62 Sloppy Joe's G4 Entertainment 63 Callejón de Hamel B4 64 Cine Actualidades H4 65 Cine Infanta A5 66 Cine Payret G5 67 Cinecito G5 Gran Teatro de la Habana (see 7) 68 Kid Chocolate G5 69La Casa de la Música Centro HabanaF4 Teatro América (see 26) Teatro Fausto (see 22) Shopping 70Area de Vendedores por Cuenta PropiaG7 71 El Bulevar F5 72 Galería la Acacia G5 73 La Manzana de Gómez G4 74 Librería Luis Rogelio Nogueras F5 75 Plaza Carlos III B7 Real Fábrica de Tabacos Partagás (see 19) Real Fábrica de Tabacos Partagás HISTORIC BUILDING (Industria No 520, btwn Barcelona Dragones; tours CUC$10; tours every 15min 9-10:15am noon-1:30pm) One of Havana’s oldest and most famous cigar factories, the landmark neoclassical Real Fábrica de Tabacos Partagás was founded in 1845 by Spaniard Jaime Partagás.

Centro Habana Top Sights 1 Malecón F2 Sights 2Asociación Cultural Yoruba de CubaG6 3 Capitolio Nacional G5 4 Castillo de San Salvador de la Punta H1 5 Escuela Nacional de Ballet G3 6 Fuente de la India G6 7 Gran Teatro de la Habana G5 8 Hotel Inglaterra G5 9Iglesia del Sagrado Corazón de JesúsD7 10 Memorial a los Estudiantes de Medicina H2 11 Monumento a Antonio Maceo B3 12 Museo Lezama Lima G3 13 Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes (Arte Universal) G5 14 Palacio de los Matrimonios G4 15 Palacio Velasco H2 16 Parque Central Around G5 17 Parque de la Fraternidad G6 18 Parque de los Enamorados G2 19 Real Fábrica de Tabacos Partagás G6 20 Statue of General Máximo Gómez H2 21 Statue of José Martí G5 22 Teatro Fausto G3 23 Torreón de San Lázaro B3 Activities, Courses Tours 24 Centro Andaluz G4 25Centro Hispano Americano de CulturaG2 26 Teatro América F4 Sleeping 27 Casa 1932 E3 28 Casa 1940 E3 29 Casa Amada D4 30 Casa de Lourdes José F3 31Dulce Hostal – Dulce María GonzálezF5 32 Esther Cardoso F4 33 Eumelia Aurelio G3 34 Hostal Peregrino G3 35 Hotel Caribbean G3 36 Hotel Deauville F3 37Hotel Iberostar Parque CentralG4 Hotel Inglaterra (see 8) 38 Hotel Lincoln F4 39 Hotel Park View G3 40 Hotel Saratoga G6 41 Hotel Sevilla G3 42 Hotel Telégrafo G4 43 Hotel Terral D3 44 Lourdes Cervantes A3 Eating 45 Almacenes Ultra F6 46 Café Neruda E3 47 Casa Miglis D4 48 Castropol F2 49 Chi Tack Tong E6 50 Flor de Loto D6 51 Infanta Cafetería A2 52 La Época F4 53 Los Gijones G4 54 Los Nardos G6 55 Paladar la Guarida D4 56 Pastelería Francesa G4 57 Restaurante Tien-Tan E6 58 San Cristóbal E5 59 Supermercado Isla de Cuba G7 Drinking Nightlife 60 Prado Animas G4 61 Prado No 12 G2 62 Sloppy Joe's G4 Entertainment 63 Callejón de Hamel B4 64 Cine Actualidades H4 65 Cine Infanta A5 66 Cine Payret G5 67 Cinecito G5 Gran Teatro de la Habana (see 7) 68 Kid Chocolate G5 69La Casa de la Música Centro HabanaF4 Teatro América (see 26) Teatro Fausto (see 22) Shopping 70Area de Vendedores por Cuenta PropiaG7 71 El Bulevar F5 72 Galería la Acacia G5 73 La Manzana de Gómez G4 74 Librería Luis Rogelio Nogueras F5 75 Plaza Carlos III B7 Real Fábrica de Tabacos Partagás (see 19) Real Fábrica de Tabacos Partagás HISTORIC BUILDING (Industria No 520, btwn Barcelona Dragones; tours CUC$10; tours every 15min 9-10:15am noon-1:30pm) One of Havana’s oldest and most famous cigar factories, the landmark neoclassical Real Fábrica de Tabacos Partagás was founded in 1845 by Spaniard Jaime Partagás.

Santiago de Cuba Top Sights 1 Cuartel Moncada D3 2 Museo de la Lucha Clandestina B5 Sights 3 Bacardí Rum Factory B3 4 Casa del Caribe H3 5 Casa Museo de Frank y Josué País C3 6 Clock Tower A4 7Fidel Castro HouseB5 8Fountain of Martí and Abel SantamaríaD3 9Moncada MuseumD3 10 Museo de la Imagen G4 11Museo-Casa Natal de Antonio MaceoB3 12 Padre Pico steps B5 13 Palacio de Justicia D3 14 Palacio de Pioneros G3 15 Parque Alameda A4 16 Parque Histórico Abel Santamaría D3 Activities, Courses Tours 17 Ballet Folklórico Cutumba D5 18 Casa del Caribe H3 Sleeping 19 Caridad Leyna Martínez H4 20 Casa Colonial 'Maruchi' C3 21 Casa Lola B3 22 Casa Marcos E3 23 Hotel las Américas F3 24 Meliá Santiago de Cuba F3 25 Villa Gaviota H3 Eating 26 El Barracón E4 27 Jardín de los Enramadas B4 28 La Arboleda D4 29 La Fortaleza G3 30 Madrileño G4 31 Municipal Market B4 32 Paladar Salón Tropical G5 33 Restaurante España D4 34 Restaurante Zunzún G3 Ristorante Italiano la Fontana (see 24) Drinking Nightlife Barrita de Ron Havana Club (see 3) 35 Club Nautico A4 Entertainment Ballet Folklórico Cutumba (see 17) 36 Casa de las Tradiciones B5 37 Departamento de Focos Culturales de la Dirección Municipal de Cuba C3 38Estadio de Béisbol Guillermón MoncadaF2 39 Foco Cultural el Tivolí B5 40 Foco Cultural Tumba Francesa C3 Santiago Café (see 24) 41 Teatro José María Heredia E1 42 Teatro Martí C3 43 Wamby Bolera F4 Shopping 44Centro de Negocios AlamedaA4 45 La Maison G4 Sights 1 Casco Histórico Parque Céspedes PARK OFFLINE MAP GOOGLE MAP If there’s an archetype for romantic Cuban street life, Parque Céspedes is it.


pages: 1,202 words: 144,667

The Linux kernel primer: a top-down approach for x86 and PowerPC architectures by Claudia Salzberg Rodriguez, Gordon Fischer, Steven Smolski

Debian, domain-specific language, en.wikipedia.org, G4S, recommendation engine, Richard Stallman

I/O APIC The x86 processors with local APIC can also be configured with 8259 type interrupt controllers instead of the I/O APIC architecture (or the I/O APIC can be configured to interface to an 8259 controller). To find out if a system is using the I/O APIC architecture, enter the following on the command line: lkp:~# cat /proc/interrupts If you see I/O-APIC listed, it is in use. Otherwise, you see XT-PIC, which means it is using the 8259 type architecture. The PowerPC interrupt controllers for the Power Mac G4 and G5 are integrated into the Key Largo and K2 I/O controllers. Entering this on the command line: lkp:~# cat /proc/interrupts on a G4 machine yields OpenPIC, which is an Open Programmable Interrupt Controller standard initiated by AMD and Cyrix in 1995 for multiprocessor systems. MPIC is the IBM implementation of OpenPIC, and is used in several of their CHRP designs. Old-world Apple machines had an in-house interrupt controller and, for the 4xx embedded processors, the interrupt controller core is integrated into the ASIC chip.

For the x86 architecture, we explore the i8259 device. For PPC, we explore the code associated with the Power Mac. The PPC implementation of init_IRQ() is in arch/ppc/kernel/irq.c. Depending on the particular hardware configuration, init_IRQ() calls one of several routines to initialize the PIC. For a Power Mac configuration, the function pmac_pic_init() in arch/ppc/platforms/pmac_pic.c is called for the G3, G4, and G5 I/O controllers. This is a hardware-specific routine that tries to identify the type of I/O controller and set it up appropriately. In this example, the PIC is part of the I/O controller device. The process for interrupt initialization is similar to x86, with the minor difference being the system timer is not started in the PPC version of init_IRQ(), but rather in the time_init() function, which is covered later in this section.

To the operating system, HyperTransport is PCI compatible.[5] See AMD chipset datasheets for the 8000 Series chipsets. Figure 5.3 illustrates the HyperTransport technology. [5] See AMD chipset datasheets for the 8000 series: http://www.amd.com/us-en/Processors/ProductInformation/0,30_118_6291_4886,00.html. Figure 5.3. AMD HyperTransport Apple, using the PowerPC, has a proprietary design called the Universal Motherboard Architecture (UMA). UMA's goal is to use the same chipset across all Mac systems. The G4 chipset includes the "UniNorth memory controller and PCI bus bridge" as a Northbridge and the "Key Largo I/O and disk-device controller" as a Southbridge. The UniNorth supports SDRAM, Ethernet, and AGP. The Key Largo Southbridge, connected to the UniNorth by a PCI-to-PCI bridge, supports the ATA busses, USB, wireless LAN (WLAN), and sound. The G5 chipset includes a system controller Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC), which supports AGP and DDR memory.


pages: 303 words: 67,891

Advances in Artificial General Intelligence: Concepts, Architectures and Algorithms: Proceedings of the Agi Workshop 2006 by Ben Goertzel, Pei Wang

AI winter, artificial general intelligence, bioinformatics, brain emulation, combinatorial explosion, complexity theory, computer vision, conceptual framework, correlation coefficient, epigenetics, friendly AI, G4S, information retrieval, Isaac Newton, John Conway, Loebner Prize, Menlo Park, natural language processing, Occam's razor, p-value, pattern recognition, performance metric, Ray Kurzweil, Rodney Brooks, semantic web, statistical model, strong AI, theory of mind, traveling salesman, Turing machine, Turing test, Von Neumann architecture, Y2K

Thus, a good strategy would be for the system to learn implications such as Implication (G3 AND G4) G2 <.9> where • • G3 = find more eggs than Bill G4 = find more eggs than Bob (which would be the case e.g. if Bill and Bob were generally the fastest egg-finders in the bunch.) Once this implication has been learned, the FeasibilityUpdating MindAgent has to notice it (which it will do, since it looks for potentially useful implications implying currently important goals), and then make feasibility evaluations regarding G3 and G4. A little inference will tell it that G3 and G4 are probably both more feasible (lower-cost) to achieve than G2, information that may then be recorded in the feasibility structures attached to these Atoms. Then, the GoalAttentionAllocation MindAgent will cause G2 to issue RFS’s to G3 and G4; and the GoalBasedSchemaSelection MindAgent will quite likely select G3 and G4 to generate schemata to be placed in the ActiveSchemaPool. 5.5.

Then, the GoalAttentionAllocation MindAgent will cause G2 to issue RFS’s to G3 and G4; and the GoalBasedSchemaSelection MindAgent will quite likely select G3 and G4 to generate schemata to be placed in the ActiveSchemaPool. 5.5. Map Formation in the Understanding of Self and Others Recall that one of the above inferences assumes the system has learned a notion of Agent that encompasses both itself and the other agents in the game. It’s fair to assume that this abstraction has been learned prior to the system being able to grapple with a B. Goertzel / Virtual Easter Egg Hunting 249 game as socially complex as IEEH. But still it’s worth discussing how this learning may occur. This topic does not have to do with IEEH in particular, so it may be considered a kind of digression or appendix to the overall theme of IEEH. Among other possible routes, this general notion of Agent may potentially be learned via pure unsupervised pattern mining.


Discover Kaua'i Travel Guide by Lonely Planet

carbon footprint, G4S, haute couture, land reform, Maui Hawaii, out of africa, polynesian navigation, profit motive, union organizing, white picket fence

Hanapepe Recreation Center ( 335-3731; 4451 Puolo Rd) Kalaheo Neighborhood Center ( 332-9770; 4480 Papalina Rd) Kapa'a Neighborhood Center ( 822-1931; 4491 Kou St) Kilauea Neighborhood Center ( 828-1421; 2460 Keneke St) Kaua'i Activities Activities, Courses & Tours Acid Drop's (see 35) 1 Ahukini Landing G5 2 Anahola Beach Park H2 Awa‘awapuhi Trail (see 48) 3 ‘Anini Beach Park F1 BK's (see 35) 4 Brennecke's Beach F7 Brennecke’s Ledge (see 4) Center's (see 35) 5 Donkey Beach H3 6 Ha‘ena Beach Park D1 7 Hanalei Bay E1 8 Hanalei River E2 9 Harbor Ledges E7 10 Hule'ia National Wildlife Refuge G6 11 Hule‘ia River G5 Ice Box (see 4) 12 Kalalau Beach C2 13 Kalalau Trail D2 14 Kalapaki Beach G5 15 Kalihiwai Stream F1 16 Kapa‘a Beach Park H3 17 Kaua'i Lagoons Golf Club G5 18 Ke Ala Hele Makalae H3 19 Kealia Beach H3 20 Ke‘e Beach D1 Kekaha Beach Park (see 21) 21 Kikiaola Small Boat Harbor B5 22 Koke‘e State Park C3 23 Koloa Landing E7 24 Kuilau Ridge Trail F4 25 Kukuiolono Golf Course E6 26 Lydgate Beach Park G4 27 Maha‘ulepu Beach F6 28 Makua (Tunnels) Beach D1 29 Mana Crack A4 30 Moalepe Trail G3 Nawiliwili Small Boat Harbor (see 14) 31 Na Pali Coast State Park C2 32 Nounou Mountain Trails G4 Nu‘alolo Trail (see 22) 33 Pakalas (Infinities) C6 Pihea Trail (see 22) 34 Po‘ipu Bay Golf Course F6 35 Po‘ipu Beach Park F7 36 Po‘ipu Beach F7 37 Port Allen D6 38 Powerline Trail F2 Running Waters Beach (see 14) 39 Salt Pond Beach Park C6 Sheraton Caverns (see 36) 40 Shipwreck Beach F7 41 St Regis Princeville Golf Club E1 42 Stone House E7 Tunnels (see 28) Tortugas/Nukumoi Point (see 35) 43 Turtle Bluff/General Store E7 Unreals (see 2) 44 Wailua Bay G4 45 Wailua Municipal Golf Course G4 46 Wailua River G4 47 Waimea Canyon Dr C4 48 Waimea Canyon State Park C4 49 Waita Reservoir F6 Sleeping 50 Hanalei (Black Pot) Beach Park E1 51 Hanama'ulu Beach Park G5 52 Lucy Wright Beach Park C6 Golf Kaua'i has only nine golf courses, but there’s something for every taste and budget.


pages: 263 words: 80,594

Stolen: How to Save the World From Financialisation by Grace Blakeley

"Robert Solow", activist fund / activist shareholder / activist investor, asset-backed security, balance sheet recession, bank run, banking crisis, banks create money, Basel III, basic income, battle of ideas, Berlin Wall, Big bang: deregulation of the City of London, bitcoin, Bretton Woods, business cycle, call centre, capital controls, Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty, Carmen Reinhart, central bank independence, collapse of Lehman Brothers, collective bargaining, corporate governance, corporate raider, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, cryptocurrency, currency peg, David Graeber, debt deflation, decarbonisation, Donald Trump, eurozone crisis, Fall of the Berlin Wall, falling living standards, financial deregulation, financial innovation, Financial Instability Hypothesis, financial intermediation, fixed income, full employment, G4S, gender pay gap, gig economy, Gini coefficient, global reserve currency, global supply chain, housing crisis, Hyman Minsky, income inequality, inflation targeting, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Kenneth Rogoff, Kickstarter, land value tax, light touch regulation, low skilled workers, market clearing, means of production, money market fund, Mont Pelerin Society, moral hazard, mortgage debt, negative equity, neoliberal agenda, new economy, Northern Rock, offshore financial centre, paradox of thrift, payday loans, pensions crisis, Ponzi scheme, price mechanism, principal–agent problem, profit motive, quantitative easing, race to the bottom, regulatory arbitrage, reserve currency, Right to Buy, rising living standards, risk-adjusted returns, road to serfdom, savings glut, secular stagnation, shareholder value, Social Responsibility of Business Is to Increase Its Profits, sovereign wealth fund, the built environment, The Great Moderation, too big to fail, transfer pricing, universal basic income, Winter of Discontent, working-age population, yield curve, zero-sum game

., Blakeley (2018c); Blakeley, G (2019) “Interserve’s Collapse Shows the UK’s Outsourcing Model Is Broken”, New Statesman, 20 March. https://www.newstatesman.com/politics/uk/2019/03/interserve-s-collapse-shows-uks-outsourcing-model-broken 26 Booth, R. and Hopkins, N. (2012) “London 2012 Olympics: G4S Failures Prompt Further Military Deployment”, Guardian, 24 July. https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2012/jul/24/london-2012-olympics-g4s-military 27 Rawlinson, K. (2014) “Private Firms ‘Are Using Detained Immigrants as Cheap Labour’”, Guardian, 22 August. https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2014/aug/22/immigrants-cheap-labour-detention-centres-g4s-serco 28 Benjamin, J. (2018) “Capita Don’t Just Provide a Few Services, They Seem Practically to Run Entire Councils”, Independent, 31 January. https://www.independent.co.uk/voices/capita-carillion-outsourcing-local-authorities-councils-barnet-northamtonpshire-a8188006.html 29 United Nations (2018) “World Altered by ‘Neoliberal’ Outsourcing of Public Services to Private Sector, Third Committee Experts Stress, amid Calls for Better Rights Protection”, Minutes of Seventy Third Session, 25 & 26 September, GA/SHC/4239. https://www.un.org/press/en/2018/gashc4239.doc.htm 30 See, e.g., Burnham, P. (2002) “New Labour and the Politics of Depoliticization”, British Journal of Politics and International Relations, vol. 3 https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/1467-856X.00054 31 This account draws on: Tooze, A. (2015) “Notes on the Global Condition: Of Bond Vigilantes, Central Bankers and the Crisis, 2008-2017”.https://adamtooze.com/2017/11/07/notes-global-conditionbond-vigilantes-central-bankers-crisis-2008-2017/; Panitch and Gindin (2013); Streeck, W. (2013), “The Politics of Public Debt: Neoliberalism, Capitalist Development, and the Restructuring of the State”, Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies Discussion Paper 13/7; Streek, W. (2015) “The Rise of the European Consolidation State”, Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies Discussion Paper 15/1; Hager, S. (2016) Public Debt, Power, and Inequality: The Making of a Modern Debt State, USA: University of California Press 32 This account draws on: Tooze (2015) and Birch, J. (2015) “The Many Lives of François Mitterrand”, Jacobin, 19 August. https://www.jacobinmag.com/2015/08/francois-mitterrand-socialist-party-common-program-communist-pcf-1981-elections-austerity/ 33 This account draws on: Panitch and Gindin (2013); Davis and Walsh (2016); Burnham (2002); Mair, P. (2013) Ruling the Void: The Hollowing of Western Democracy, London: Verso; Streeck (2014); Rodrik, D. (2018) “The Double Threat to Liberal Democracy”, Project Syndicate. https://www.project-syndicate.org/commentary/double-threat-to-liberaldemocracy-by-dani-rodrik-2018-02?

Outsourcing has an ambiguous record.25 There are examples of relative success, where public procurement has been used wisely, as well as examples of dramatic failures, with low-quality services being delivered by unscrupulous contractors at a huge cost to the taxpayer. There are arguments for outsourcing government projects when procurement is done well and includes, for example, commitments to use companies with unionised workforces and with high environmental standards. But today, outsourcing is mostly dominated by a few big firms delivering low-quality services whilst skimming money off the top for shareholders and executives. G4S managed the security for the London Olympic Games so badly that the government was forced to bring in the army to support them.26 Serco operates some of the UK’s most brutal detention centres and has even been accused of using inmates as cheap labour.27 Capita is known for gouging many of the UK’s local authorities by delivering low-quality services at eye-watering prices.28 These outsourcing oligopolies have their tentacles spread all over the spending of the British state, from schools and hospitals, to prisons and detention centres.


pages: 511 words: 111,423

Learning SPARQL by Bob Ducharme

Donald Knuth, en.wikipedia.org, G4S, hypertext link, linked data, place-making, semantic web, SPARQL, web application

It then inserts copies of these triples into a new d:g4 graph: # filename: ex344.ru PREFIX d: <http://learningsparql.com/ns/data#> PREFIX dm: <http://learningsparql.com/ns/demo#> INSERT { GRAPH d:g4 { ?s dm:tag "five", "six" . } } USING d:g2 WHERE { ?s dm:tag "five" . ?s dm:tag "six" . } After running it, run the ex332.rq List All Triples SELECT query, and you’ll see that the two triples inserted into graph d:g4 both have subjects of d:x. Although the default graph has triples that match the WHERE clause’s patterns (the ones with a subject of d:w that you inserted with update request ex343.ru), the USING keyword specifically told the SPARQL processor to look in the d:g2 graph for triples that matched those patterns, so those are the ones that got copied to d:g4. If the USING keyword in an update request is like FROM in a SELECT query, then USING NAMED is like FROM NAMED: it specifies a graph that will be referenced by name.

If the USING keyword in an update request is like FROM in a SELECT query, then USING NAMED is like FROM NAMED: it specifies a graph that will be referenced by name. If the ex344.ru update request had said USING NAMED instead of just USING, the query processor wouldn’t have found those triples in the d:g2 graph unless the name was explicitly included in the WHERE clause, like this: # filename: ex345.ru PREFIX d: <http://learningsparql.com/ns/data#> PREFIX dm: <http://learningsparql.com/ns/demo#> INSERT { GRAPH d:g4 { ?s dm:tag "five", "six" . } } USING NAMED d:g2 WHERE { GRAPH d:g2 { ?s dm:tag "five" . ?s dm:tag "six" . } } Copying and Moving Entire Graphs SPARQL Update’s COPY and MOVE operations let you copy and move triples between named graphs or between the default graph and a named graph. We can set up some sample data to see their effects by first running the DROP ALL command shown in ex337.ru in Dropping Graphs, and then running the ex338.ru update that follows it.


Pocket London Travel Guide by Lonely Planet

Boris Johnson, British Empire, congestion charging, G4S, Isaac Newton, Mahatma Gandhi, Skype

Catch an evening musical performance at the Barbican (Click here) or embark on a tour of local historic pubs, including Ye Olde Watling (Click here), Ye Olde Cheshire Cheese (Click here) and the Black Friar (Click here), but note some City pubs are shut at weekends. Shoreditch (Click here) also makes a fine alternative for an entertaining and memorable evening out in London. St Pauls Top Sights St Paul's Cathedral C3 Tower of London H5 Sights 1 Museum of London C2 2 Tower Bridge H5 3 All Hallows-by-the-Tower G4 4 Monument E4 5 St Olave G4 6 St Stephen Walbrook E3 7 Trinity Square Gardens G4 8 Lloyd's of London F3 9 Bank of England Museum E3 10 Mansion House E3 Eating Sauterelle (see 14) 11 Sweeting's D3 12 Café Below D3 13 City Càphê D3 14 Royal Exchange Grand Café & Bar E3 15 Bar Battu D3 16 Wine Library H4 Drinking 17 Vertigo 42 F2 18 Black Friar B4 19 Counting House F3 20 Ye Olde Watling D3 21 Ye Olde Cheshire Cheese A3 Entertainment 22 Barbican D1 Shopping 23 Smithfield Market B1 Top Sights St Paul’s Cathedral Offline map www.stpauls.co.uk St Paul’s Churchyard EC4 adult/child £14.50/5.50 8.30am-4.30pm Mon-Sat, last admission 4pm St Paul’s Towering over Ludgate Hill, in a superb position that has been a place of worship for over 1400 years, St Paul’s Cathedral is one of London’s most majestic structures.


pages: 135 words: 53,708

Top 10 San Diego by Pamela Barrus, Dk Publishing

California gold rush, centre right, Charles Lindbergh, East Village, El Camino Real, G4S, haute cuisine, illegal immigration, Silicon Valley, the market place, transcontinental railway, urban renewal

The best view of the bridge, especially during Christmas, is from the 163 Freeway below. d Map K1 Towering surfboards stand in tribute to the surf gods. d Map E3 • Imperial Beach Pier Woman of Tehuantepec A 1,200-lb (544-kg) piece of limestone is sculpted into an Indian woman. d Map L2 • House of Hospitality Sun God A fiberglass bird stretches its wings atop a 15-ft (5-m) concrete arch. d Map B1 Paper Vortex A paper airplane is artfully transformed into an Origami crane. d Map C5 • San Diego International Airport Homecoming A bronze sculpture depicts a sailor, wife, and child in a joyous homecoming embrace. d Map G4 • Navy Pier, Harbor Drive 45 San Diego’s Top 10 Left Balboa Park’s Alcázar Garden Right Ellen Browning Scripps Park Gardens & Nature Reserves Balboa Park This landmark destination and heart of San Diego offers an array of superb activities. Visit its gardens and museums for inspiration, to play sports, or to watch a concert. Although crowded, Sundays are good days to experience the community at leisure (see pp14–15).

The company produces 70 different products from kelp, including stabilizers used in everything from salad dressing and ice cream to beer and car wax. d Map D6 These are all sights that are pointed out while on a harbor cruise; most cannot be visited. Price Categories $ $$ $$$ $$$$ $$$$$ For a three course meal for one with half a bottle of wine (or equivalent meal), taxes and extra charges. under $20 $20–$40 $40–$55 $55–$80 over $80 Places to Eat Star of the Sea Dine in style at this restaurant suspended over the water on the Embarcadero. Seafood classics are imaginative. d Map G4 • 1360 N. Harbor Dr • (619) 232-7408 • $$$$ Dakota Grill & Spirits Exceptional Californian and Southwestern food. Wood-fired pizzas and rib-eye steaks are prepared in an open kitchen. d Map K4 • 901 5th Ave • (619) 234-5554 • $$$ Karl Strauss’ Brewery & Restaurant Try the outstanding burgers, blackened salmon, or baby back ribs. House brews Windansea Wheat, Black’s Beach Extra Dark, and Red Trolley Ale celebrate the local spirit. d Map H4 • 1157 Columbia St • (619) 234-2739 • $$ Star of India A great selection of curries, tandoori-style chicken, lamb, and vegetarian dishes. d Map J5 • 423 F St • (619) 544-9891 • $$ The Grant Grill Sporting a club-like, masculine ambience, try sturdy fare such as beef medallions and rack of lamb. d Map J4 • US Grant Hotel, 326 Broadway • (619) 232-3121 • $$$$ Top of the Market The chichi sister of the Fish Market (see p54), come here for a window seat, a quieter atmosphere, and seafood prepared with panache. d Map G5 • 750 N.

., 375 Hudson Street, New York, New York 10014. 127 Index Selected Street Index 128 1st Avenue 1st Street 2nd Avenue 3rd Avenue 3rd Street 4th Avenue 4th Street 5th Avenue 6th Avenue 7th Avenue 8th Avenue 9th Avenue 10th Avenue 11th Avenue 12th Avenue 13th Street 14th Street 15th Street 16th Street 17th Street 19th Street 20th Street 21st Street 22nd Street 23rd Street 24th Street 30th Street 47th Street 54th Street A Street Adams Avenue Aero Drive Alameda Boulevard Alameda Drive Altamirano Way Ampudia Street Ardath Road Arguello Street Arista Drive Ash Street Avenue de la Playa B Street Balboa Avenue Balboa Drive Bandini Street Barnett Avenue Beech Street Brant Street Broadway C Street Cabrillo Freeway Cabrillo Memorial Drive California Street Calle de la Plata Calle del Oro Caminito Centro Canon Street Catalina Boulevard Cedar Street Chatsworth Boulevard Clairemont Drive Clairemont Mesa Boulevard Coast Boulevard College Avenue Collwood Boulevard Columbia Street Commercial Street Conde Street Congress Street Convention Way Country Club Drive Crespo Drive Curlew Street Cuvier Street Date Street J3 C5 J3 J3 C6 J3 C6 K3 K3 K5 K5 K5 K5 K5 L5 L4 L4 L4 L4 L4 M5 M5 M5 M5 M4 M5 D5 E5 E4 K4 D4 D3 C6 Q6 P5 P5 Q2 Q6 P5 K3 Q2 K4 B3 K1 Q6 B4 K3 J2 H4 K4 K2 A5 H3 Q2 Q1 M3 B5 A5 H3 B5 C3 B2 N2 E3 E4 H2 M6 P6 P6 J6 P3 P3 H1 N3 H3 Diamond Street A3 Division Street E6 Draper Avenue N3 Drury Avenue N3 E Street K4 El Cajon Boulevard D4 El Paseo Dorado P2 El Paseo Grande Q2 El Prado K1 Eldine Drive E4 Elm Street J3 Euclid Avenue E6 F Street H5 Fairmount Avenue E4 Fay Avenue A3 Fern Street D5 Fir Street H3 Florida Drive M2 Fort Stockton Drive Q5 Friars Road P4 Front Street J3 G Street H5 Garnet Avenue A3 Genesee Avenue B1 Gilman Drive B2 Girard Avenue N3 Glorietta Boulevard C6 Governor Drive B2 Grand Avenue B3 Grape Street J2 Harbor Drive G4 Harney Street P6 Hawthorn Street J2 Herschel Avenue P2 Hickory Street Q5 High Avenue P3 Highland Avenue E6 Hillside Drive Q3 Hortensia Street P6 Hotel Circle North Q4 Hotel Circle South Q4 Imperial Avenue L6 India Street H2 Ingelside Street Q6 Island Avenue K5 Ivanhoe Avenue P2 Ivy Street J2 J Street L5 Jackson Street P5 Jacob Dekema Freeway C1 Jefferson Street P6 Juan Street P5 Juniper Street J2 K Street L6 Kalmia Street J2 Kearsarge Road P3 Kettner Boulevard H5 Kurtz Street N6 L Street L6 La Jolla Boulevard N3 La Jolla Shores Drive Q1 Lake Murray Boulevard F3 Laurel Street J1 Lemon Grove Avenue F5 Linda Vista Road C4 Linwood Street Q6 Logan Avenue E6 Main Street D6 Maple Street J1 Marilouise Way P5 Marina Park Way J6 Market Street K5 Martin Luther King Jr.


pages: 164 words: 57,068

The Second Curve: Thoughts on Reinventing Society by Charles Handy

"Robert Solow", Airbnb, basic income, Bernie Madoff, bitcoin, bonus culture, British Empire, call centre, Clayton Christensen, corporate governance, delayed gratification, Diane Coyle, disruptive innovation, Edward Snowden, falling living standards, future of work, G4S, greed is good, informal economy, Internet of things, invisible hand, joint-stock company, joint-stock limited liability company, Kickstarter, Kodak vs Instagram, late capitalism, mass immigration, megacity, mittelstand, Occupy movement, payday loans, peer-to-peer lending, plutocrats, Plutocrats, Ponzi scheme, Ronald Coase, shareholder value, sharing economy, Skype, Social Responsibility of Business Is to Increase Its Profits, Stanford marshmallow experiment, Steve Jobs, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thorstein Veblen, too big to fail, transaction costs, Veblen good, Walter Mischel

But there often comes a point where bigger is too big, where the economies of scale bring less obvious psychological and social disadvantages, creating organisations that seem too big to be managed sensibly and effectively. A case in point is G4S. Originally an amalgamation of two Danish and British security companies, it went on a buying spree in 2008, acquiring over a dozen companies, and has now ended up with more than 620,000 employees, making it the third largest private-sector employer in the world after Walmart and Foxconn in China. Both of the latter are closely focused on either retailing or manufacturing but G4S has spread its wings far wider, operating a range of security and associated services for governments and others in more than 125 different countries, effectively doing the jobs that governments don’t want to do.

The day of the mass employment organisation, with everyone under one uniform corporate umbrella if not one physical roof, could be the first to go. That may be no bad thing. Size breeds inhumanity, reducing individuals to mere human resources, costs in the account books. In the lower regions of these vast armies one can feel like a very small cog in a huge machine. At their worst they can be prisons for the human soul. The likes of Walmart and G4S have a huge headcount but are actually collections of small organisations, not the conglomerations of old, massed behind the factory gates. Other large organisations, my old oil company included, are gradually going federal although they don’t necessarily call it that, aiming to be big where it matters and small where they can in order to keep it human and flexible. They look for a requisite variety of shape and size and style, while keeping it all connected by company websites, emails, Skype, messaging and even the old-fashioned telephone turned smartphone.


pages: 287 words: 44,739

Guide to business modelling by John Tennent, Graham Friend, Economist Group

business cycle, correlation coefficient, discounted cash flows, double entry bookkeeping, G4S, intangible asset, iterative process, purchasing power parity, RAND corporation, shareholder value, the market place, time value of money

The US inflation index has been calculated by applying the US inflation forecast to the index of the previous period. In addition, row 5 links to the earlier inflation forecast in the range UK_inflation_index. It is assumed that the inflation forecast relates to the UK. Relative range names have been created for the previous period’s inflation index and for the previous period’s exchange rate: Previous_US_inflation_index Previous_period_exchange_rate For example, in cell G4, the Previous_US_inflation_index is set equal to cell ⫽‘Exchange Rate Workings’!F4 in the “Refers to:” section of the Define Name dialog box and the $ signs have been removed. In cell G6, the Previous_period_exchange_rate is set equal to cell ⫽‘Exchange Rate Workings’!F6. 82 9. MACROECONOMIC FACTORS Chart 9.17 Exchange rate workings The exchange rate calculation involves adjusting the previous period’s exchange rate by the ratio of the proportionate change in the US inflation index and the proportionate change in the UK inflation index.

The calculation is shown below: Current US inflation index Previous US inflation index Previous period’s exchange rate ⫻ Current UK inflation index Previous UK inflation index Chart 9.18 Exchange rate workings code Row US$ inflation index UK inflation index Exchange rate US$/GBP Calculation ⫽IF(Year⫽1, Exchange_rate_input_US_ inflation_index_start_point*(1⫹ Exchange_rate_input_US_inflation _rate),Previous_US_inflation_index* (1⫹Exchange_rate_input_US_ inflation_rate)) ⫽UK_inflation_index ⫽IF(Year⫽1, Exchange_rate_input_initial_ exchange_rate,IF(Exchange_Rate_ input_manual_exchange_rate_ entry⫽“”,Previous_period_ Actual calculation ⫽IF(FALSE,100*(1⫹2%), 104.04*(1⫹2%)) Answer 106.12 108.13 ⫽IF(FALSE,1.6, IF(FALSE,1,5883⫻ ((106.12/104.04)/ (108.13/106.09)), no entry)) 108.13 1.5896 exchange_rate*((G4/F4)/(G5/F5)), Exchange_rate_input_manual_ exchange_rate_entry)) The results of the exchange-rate forecast are presented in the graph in Chart 9.19. Exchange rates 83 Chart 9.19 $/£ exchange rate forecast POPULATION Definition and uses The definition of population is usually straightforward – it is the number of people in a country. However, some care may need to be taken when a country has a large number of temporary residents or seasonal workers.

The column and row headings and range names should be established before defining the ranges. User inputs should be made before performing the calculations. Range names are indicated in column B, and relative references have been created for the previous year with the range name Last_year and also for the previous period’s closing balance with the name Previous_closing_balance. In the case of Previous_closing_balance, the relative reference could be created in G4 and should refer to F8, the previous period’s closing balance. For the purposes of the example, inputs such as the first year, the opening cash balance, the cash movement for the period and the interest rate are included on the same sheet as the workings. In a full model these inputs would be drawn from the workings and input sheets created elsewhere in the model. The opening cash balance may be drawn from the opening balance sheet and the cash movement may be picked up from the cash flow statement. 160 14.


pages: 124 words: 9,170

Simulations by Jean Baudrillard

G4S

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


pages: 98 words: 27,201

Are Chief Executives Overpaid? by Deborah Hargreaves

banking crisis, Big bang: deregulation of the City of London, bonus culture, business climate, corporate governance, Donald Trump, G4S, Jeff Bezos, loadsamoney, Mark Zuckerberg, Martin Wolf, performance metric, principal–agent problem, profit maximization, Ronald Reagan, shareholder value, Snapchat, trade liberalization, trickle-down economics, wealth creators

At the beginning of 2017, Mr Corbyn said ‘A 20:1 ratio means someone earning the living wage, just over £16,000 a year, would permit an executive to be earning nearly £350,000. It cannot be right if companies are getting public money that can be creamed off by a few at the top.’4 This would mean huge pay cuts for those leading outsourcing companies such as Capita and G4S who run security services and other public functions. The boss of private security firm G4S was paid £4.8 million in 2016, and Andy Parker, who ran Capita until he stepped down in September 2017, received £2.4 million the same year, while the average wage in the UK remains £28,000. In the light of this, Mr Corbyn’s ratio is a stretch for most companies. Business lobby groups reacted swiftly to dismiss the proposal, with the Institute of Directors calling it a ‘non-starter’.


Pocket New York City Travel Guide by Lonely Planet

Airbnb, Chuck Templeton: OpenTable:, East Village, Frank Gehry, G4S, ghettoisation, Saturday Night Live, starchitect, the High Line, urban renewal, walking around money

For a taste of the Prohibition-chic craze that has take the city by storm, try Little Branch (Click here) or Bathtub Gin (Click here). Or, you can catch some laughs at comedy headquarters like the Upright Citizens Brigade Theatre (Click here) or the Comedy Cellar (Click here). For a local’s day in Chelsea, Click here. Greenwich Village, Chelsea & the Meatpacking District Top Sights The High Line C3 Sights 1 Washington Square Park F4 2 Chelsea Market C3 3 New York University G4 4 Astor Place G4 5 Pier 45 C5 6 Grace Church G4 7 Chelsea Art Museum B2 8 Chelsea Hotel E1 9 Chelsea Piers Complex B2 10 Forbes Collection F3 11 Downtown Boathouse D5 New York Trapeze School (see 11) Eating 12 RedFarm D4 13 Tartine D4 14 Cookshop C2 15 Le Grainne C2 16 Tomoe F5 17 Billy's Bakery D2 18 Spotted Pig D4 19 Minetta Tavern F5 20 Café Cluny D4 21 Taïm E4 22 Tertulia E4 23 Barbuto C4 24 Joe's Pizza E5 25 Souen G3 26 Co D1 Drinking 27 Little Branch E5 28 Marie's Crisis E4 29 Art Bar D3 30 Vin Sur Vingt E3 31 Bathtub Gin D2 32 Vol de Nuit F4 33 Boom Boom Room C3 Le Bain (see 33) 34 Kettle of Fish E4 35 124 Old Rabbit Club F5 36 Julius Bar E4 37 G Lounge E2 38 Barracuda E1 39 Cubbyhole D3 40 Rawhide D2 Entertainment 41 Upright Citizens Brigade Theatre D1 42 Comedy Cellar F5 43 Sleep No More B1 44 Village Vanguard E4 45 Blue Note F5 46 Cherry Lane Theater E5 47 Angelika Film Center G5 48 Smalls Jazz Club E4 Duplex (see 34) 49 IFC Center E5 50 Le Poisson Rouge F5 51 Magnet Theater D1 52 Atlantic Theater Company D2 53 Kitchen C2 Shopping 54 Barneys Co-op D2 55 Yoyamart D3 56 Strand Book Store G3 57 Printed Matter C2 Bonnie Slotnick Cookbooks (see 36) 58 Three Lives & Company E4 59 The Bathroom E4 60 Jeffrey New York C3 Greenwich Letterpress (see 34) 61 Marc by Marc Jacobs D4 62 Stella McCartney C3 63 Nasty Pig D2 64 Forbidden Planet G3 65 Abracadabra F2 66 192 Books C2 Top Sights The High Line www.thehighline.org Gansevoort St 7am-7pm L, A/C/E to 14th St-8th Ave, C/E to 23rd St-8th Ave, M11 to Washington St, M11, M14 to 9th Ave, M34 to 10th Ave In the early 1900s, the area around western Chelsea was the largest industrial section of Manhattan and a set of elevated tracks were created to move freight off the cluttered streets below.


pages: 212 words: 65,900

Symmetry and the Monster by Ronan, Mark

Albert Einstein, Andrew Wiles, conceptual framework, Everything should be made as simple as possible, G4S, Henri Poincaré, John Conway, John von Neumann, Kickstarter, New Journalism, Pierre-Simon Laplace, Richard Feynman, V2 rocket

The size of the Monster was now known, and in the first week of January 1974, Fischer talked on the new group at a working conference organised by Baer in Oberwolfach. In a leather-bound tome called the Vortragsbuch (Book of Talks) he wrote a report, the first publicly available mention of the Monster: There appear to be simple groups [symmetry atoms] of the following sizes: G1: 241·313·56·72·11·13·17·19·23·31·47 G2: 215·310·53·72·13·19·31 G3: 214·36·56·7·11·19 G4: 246·320·59·76·112·133·17·19·23·29·31·41·47·59·71 . . . The sizes of G2, G3, G4 were determined by Conway, Harada and Thompson. In this quotation G1 denotes Fischer’s Baby Monster, and G4 the Monster; G2 was later named after Thompson, and G3 after Harada and Norton, in honour of those who did most of the calculations on them. Having the size of the Monster was essential before working out its character table. This was calculated in Birmingham, not in Cambridge, but the Cambridge people made a vital contribution.


Lonely Planet Ireland by Lonely Planet

bank run, banking crisis, Berlin Wall, Bernie Sanders, bike sharing scheme, Bob Geldof, British Empire, carbon footprint, Celtic Tiger, credit crunch, G4S, glass ceiling, global village, haute cuisine, hydraulic fracturing, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Jacquard loom, Kickstarter, land reform, reserve currency, sustainable-tourism, young professional

Australian Embassy ( GOOGLE MAP ; %01-664 5300; www.ireland.embassy.gov.au; Fitzwilton House, 7th fl, Wilton Tce, Dublin 2; h8.30am-4.30pm Mon-Fri; g37 from city centre) Canadian Embassy ( GOOGLE MAP ; %01-234 4000; www.canada.ie; 7-8 Wilton Tce, Dublin 2; h9am-1pm & 2-4.30pm; g37 from city centre) Dutch Embassy ( GOOGLE MAP ; %01-269 3444; www.netherlandsandyou.nl/your-country-and-the-netherlands/ireland; 160 Merrion Rd, Ballsbridge, Dublin 4; h8.30am-12.30pm & 1.45-4pm Mon-Fri; g4, 7, 8 from city centre) Dutch Consulate ( GOOGLE MAP ; %028-9077 9088; 14-16 West Bank Rd, c/o All-Route Shipping Ltd; h9am-1pm & 2-4.30pm Mon-Fri; gMount Vernon House) in Belfast French Embassy ( GOOGLE MAP ; %01-277 5000; www.ambafrance-ie.org; 66 Fitzwilliam Lane, Dublin 2; h9-10am & noon-4pm Mon-Fri; g46A from city centre) German Embassy ( GOOGLE MAP ; %01-269 3011; www.dublin.diplo.de; 31 Trimleston Ave, Booterstown, Blackrock, Co Dublin; h8am-5pm Mon-Thu, to 2pm Fri, consular service 9am-noon Mon, Tue & Fri, 8.30-11.30am & 2-4pm Wed; dBooterstown) Italian Embassy ( GOOGLE MAP ; %01-660 1744; www.ambdublino.esteri.it/Ambasciata_Dublino; 63-65 Northumberland Rd, Ballsbridge, Dublin 4; h10am-12.40pm Mon, Wed & Fri, 1.20-3.40pm Tue & Thu; g4, 7, 63, 84 from city centre) UK Embassy ( GOOGLE MAP ; %01-205 3700; www.gov.uk; 29 Merrion Rd, Ballsbridge, Dublin 4; h9am-5pm Mon-Fri; g4, 7, 8 from city centre) US Embassy ( GOOGLE MAP ; %01-630 6200; http://ie.usembassy.gov/embassy; 42 Elgin Rd, Ballsbridge, Dublin; g4, 7, 8 from city centre) US Consulate ( GOOGLE MAP ; %028-9038 6100; https://uk.usembassy.gov/embassy-consulates/belfast; Danesfort House, 223 Stranmillis Rd; h8.30am-5pm Mon-Fri; gBroomhill Pk) in Belfast Food Booking ahead is recommended in cities and larger towns; same-day reservations are usually fine except for top-end restaurants – book those two weeks in advance.

Australian Embassy ( GOOGLE MAP ; %01-664 5300; www.ireland.embassy.gov.au; Fitzwilton House, 7th fl, Wilton Tce, Dublin 2; h8.30am-4.30pm Mon-Fri; g37 from city centre) Canadian Embassy ( GOOGLE MAP ; %01-234 4000; www.canada.ie; 7-8 Wilton Tce, Dublin 2; h9am-1pm & 2-4.30pm; g37 from city centre) Dutch Embassy ( GOOGLE MAP ; %01-269 3444; www.netherlandsandyou.nl/your-country-and-the-netherlands/ireland; 160 Merrion Rd, Ballsbridge, Dublin 4; h8.30am-12.30pm & 1.45-4pm Mon-Fri; g4, 7, 8 from city centre) Dutch Consulate ( GOOGLE MAP ; %028-9077 9088; 14-16 West Bank Rd, c/o All-Route Shipping Ltd; h9am-1pm & 2-4.30pm Mon-Fri; gMount Vernon House) in Belfast French Embassy ( GOOGLE MAP ; %01-277 5000; www.ambafrance-ie.org; 66 Fitzwilliam Lane, Dublin 2; h9-10am & noon-4pm Mon-Fri; g46A from city centre) German Embassy ( GOOGLE MAP ; %01-269 3011; www.dublin.diplo.de; 31 Trimleston Ave, Booterstown, Blackrock, Co Dublin; h8am-5pm Mon-Thu, to 2pm Fri, consular service 9am-noon Mon, Tue & Fri, 8.30-11.30am & 2-4pm Wed; dBooterstown) Italian Embassy ( GOOGLE MAP ; %01-660 1744; www.ambdublino.esteri.it/Ambasciata_Dublino; 63-65 Northumberland Rd, Ballsbridge, Dublin 4; h10am-12.40pm Mon, Wed & Fri, 1.20-3.40pm Tue & Thu; g4, 7, 63, 84 from city centre) UK Embassy ( GOOGLE MAP ; %01-205 3700; www.gov.uk; 29 Merrion Rd, Ballsbridge, Dublin 4; h9am-5pm Mon-Fri; g4, 7, 8 from city centre) US Embassy ( GOOGLE MAP ; %01-630 6200; http://ie.usembassy.gov/embassy; 42 Elgin Rd, Ballsbridge, Dublin; g4, 7, 8 from city centre) US Consulate ( GOOGLE MAP ; %028-9038 6100; https://uk.usembassy.gov/embassy-consulates/belfast; Danesfort House, 223 Stranmillis Rd; h8.30am-5pm Mon-Fri; gBroomhill Pk) in Belfast Food Booking ahead is recommended in cities and larger towns; same-day reservations are usually fine except for top-end restaurants – book those two weeks in advance. Restaurants From cheap cafes to Michelin-starred feasts, covering every imaginable cuisine. Cafes Open during the daytime (rarely at night), cafes are good for all-day breakfasts, sandwiches and basic dishes.

Upstairs are Medieval Ireland 1150 – 1550, Viking Ireland – which features exhibits from the excavations at Wood Quay, the area between Christ Church Cathedral and the river – and Ancient Egypt, featuring items acquired from excavations conducted between 1890 and 1930. The museum has three sister museums throughout the country: the stuffed beasts of the Museum of Natural History, the decorative arts section at Collins Barracks, and a country life museum in County Mayo, on Ireland’s west coast. oNational GalleryMUSEUM ( MAP GOOGLE MAP ; www.nationalgallery.ie; W Merrion Sq; h9.15am-5.30pm Mon-Wed, Fri & Sat, to 8.30pm Thu, 11am-5.30pm Sun; g4, 7, 8, 46A from city centre)F A magnificent Caravaggio and a breathtaking collection of works by Jack B Yeats – William Butler's younger brother – are the main reasons to visit the National Gallery, but not the only ones. Its excellent collection is strong in Irish art, and there are also high-quality collections of every major European school of painting. Spread about its four wings you'll find: works by Rembrandt and his circle; a Spanish collection with paintings by El Greco, Goya and Picasso; and a well-represented display of Italian works dating from the early Renaissance to the 18th century.


pages: 354 words: 105,322

The Road to Ruin: The Global Elites' Secret Plan for the Next Financial Crisis by James Rickards

"Robert Solow", Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Albert Einstein, asset allocation, asset-backed security, bank run, banking crisis, barriers to entry, Bayesian statistics, Ben Bernanke: helicopter money, Benoit Mandelbrot, Berlin Wall, Bernie Sanders, Big bang: deregulation of the City of London, bitcoin, Black Swan, blockchain, Bonfire of the Vanities, Bretton Woods, British Empire, business cycle, butterfly effect, buy and hold, capital controls, Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty, Carmen Reinhart, cellular automata, cognitive bias, cognitive dissonance, complexity theory, Corn Laws, corporate governance, creative destruction, Credit Default Swap, cuban missile crisis, currency manipulation / currency intervention, currency peg, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, David Ricardo: comparative advantage, debt deflation, Deng Xiaoping, disintermediation, distributed ledger, diversification, diversified portfolio, Edward Lorenz: Chaos theory, Eugene Fama: efficient market hypothesis, failed state, Fall of the Berlin Wall, fiat currency, financial repression, fixed income, Flash crash, floating exchange rates, forward guidance, Fractional reserve banking, G4S, George Akerlof, global reserve currency, high net worth, Hyman Minsky, income inequality, information asymmetry, interest rate swap, Isaac Newton, jitney, John Meriwether, John von Neumann, Joseph Schumpeter, Kenneth Rogoff, labor-force participation, large denomination, liquidity trap, Long Term Capital Management, mandelbrot fractal, margin call, market bubble, Mexican peso crisis / tequila crisis, money market fund, mutually assured destruction, Myron Scholes, Naomi Klein, nuclear winter, obamacare, offshore financial centre, Paul Samuelson, Peace of Westphalia, Pierre-Simon Laplace, plutocrats, Plutocrats, prediction markets, price anchoring, price stability, quantitative easing, RAND corporation, random walk, reserve currency, RFID, risk-adjusted returns, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, sovereign wealth fund, special drawing rights, stocks for the long run, The Bell Curve by Richard Herrnstein and Charles Murray, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, The Wisdom of Crowds, theory of mind, Thomas Bayes, Thomas Kuhn: the structure of scientific revolutions, too big to fail, transfer pricing, value at risk, Washington Consensus, Westphalian system

Those four G20 members comprise two-thirds of global GDP and make up a de facto G4 inside the G20. The problem confronted by the G4 in Shanghai was that growth in China and the United States was slowing dangerously, and global growth was weakened by that slowdown. Structural reforms were stalled by political gridlock. Fiscal policy was constrained by already excessive debt. Monetary policy was increasingly ineffective, even counterproductive. With structural reform, fiscal stimulus, and monetary ease off the table, the only stimulus channel left was a return to the currency wars. A cheaper yuan gives a temporary lift to China even if it comes at the expense of its trading partners. China devalued unilaterally in August and December 2015. Both times U.S. stock markets crashed in the aftermath. The G4 needed to find a way to cheapen the yuan without destabilizing the U.S. stock market.

A cheap yen had prevailed since 2013, and a cheap euro since 2014. Japan failed to make needed structural reforms. Now it was out of time. A new cheap-yuan, cheap-dollar phase was about to commence. The world’s two largest economies—China and the United States—needed help. This was the essence of the Shanghai Accord. The challenge for analysts is that initially there was not a shred of evidence to prove the accord. The G4 meeting was conducted in secret and no explicit press releases or other information was shared. Analysts scoffed at the idea of a Shanghai Accord. Prominent foreign exchange expert Marc Chandler of Brown Brothers Harriman, writing about the Shanghai Accord, said, “Conspiracy theories have run amok.” Bayes’ theorem allows an analyst to do better than conspiracy theories. A geopolitical action like the Shanghai Accord with scarce hard data to confirm it is the type of event Bayes’ theorem is designed to validate.


Discover Greece Travel Guide by Lonely Planet

car-free, carbon footprint, credit crunch, G4S, haute couture, haute cuisine, low cost airline, low cost carrier, pension reform, sensible shoes, too big to fail, trade route, urban renewal

Although the tower’s whitewash has long been removed, the name stuck. The tower’s new interactive museum presents the city’s history through several levels of cool multimedia displays (designed by Apple). Thessaloniki Sights 1 Arch of Galerius G4 2 Atatürk's HouseH3 3 Church of Agios Dimitrios E1 4 Jewish Museum of ThessalonikiC3 5 Palace of Galerius F5 6 Roman AgoraE2 7 Rotunda of Galerius G4 8 Thessaloniki Museum of Photography A4 9 White TowerF7 Sleeping 10 Daios E6 11 Le Palace Hotel C3 12 Rent Rooms Thessaloniki H4 Eating 13 Agapitos F4 14 Dore Zythos F7 15 Hatzis G4 16 Kokkinos Fournos G3 17 Molyvos C2 18 Molyvos Ethnik C2 19 Panellinion A3 20 Paparouna C2 21 To Etsi F7 22 Trigona Elenidis F6 Drinking 23 Beerstore C4 24 Kafe Nikis 35 D5 25 Kafenai F7 26 Loxias F5 27 Partizan Bar C2 28 Spiti MouB1 Entertainment 29 National Theatre of Northern GreeceF7 Shopping 30 Georgiadis F4 PALACE, ARCH & ROTUNDA OF GALERIUS Historic Area Three major Roman monuments associated with the early-4th-century Emperor Galerius spill across Egnatia at Plateia Navarinou.

Central Athens Top Sights Acropolis C5 Acropolis MuseumD7 Ancient Agora B3 Monastiraki Flea Market B3 Odeon of Herodes AtticusB6 Plateia SyntagmatosG3 Temple of Olympian ZeusF6 Sights 1Agios Nikolaos RangavasD5 2AsclepionC6 3Church of Sotira LykodimouG4 4 Church of the Holy ApostlesB4 5ErechtheionC5 6 Hellenic Children's Museum E5 7 Museum of Greek Children's Art F4 8 National Gardens G4 9ParthenonC5 10PropylaiaB5 11Stoa of Attalos & Agora MuseumB3 12Temple of Athena NikeB5 13Temple of HephaestusA3 14 Theatre of Dionysos D6 15 Turkish Baths D4 16Zappieo GardensF5 Activities, Courses & Tours 17 Athens Happy Train F3 18 CitySightseeing Athens F3 Sleeping 19 Athens Gate E7 20 Electra Palace E4 21 Hera Hotel D8 22 Hotel Phaedra E5 23 Magna Grecia D3 24 NEW F4 Eating 25 Ariston F2 26 Café Avyssinia B2 27 Kostas D2 28 Mani Mani D8 29 Palia Taverna tou Psara D4 30Pure BlissE2 31 Tzitzikas & Mermingas F3 Drinking 32 Brettos E5 33MelinaD4 34Zonar'sG2 Entertainment 35Perivoli Tou OuranouE6 Shopping 36 Amorgos F4 37 Compendium F4 38 Greece Is For Lovers C7 39 Melissinos Art C2 40 Olgianna Melissinos B2 The quiet residential neighbourhoods Makrygianni and Koukaki, south of the Acropolis, around the new Acropolis Museum, are refreshingly untouristy.


Lonely Planet France by Lonely Planet Publications

banking crisis, bike sharing scheme, British Empire, car-free, carbon footprint, centre right, Charles Lindbergh, Columbine, double helix, Frank Gehry, G4S, glass ceiling, haute couture, haute cuisine, Henri Poincaré, Honoré de Balzac, illegal immigration, Jacquard loom, Joseph-Marie Jacquard, Kickstarter, Louis Blériot, Louis Pasteur, low cost airline, low cost carrier, Mahatma Gandhi, mass immigration, Murano, Venice glass, ride hailing / ride sharing, sensible shoes, Silicon Valley, supervolcano, trade route, urban renewal, urban sprawl, V2 rocket

Sights CHÂTEAU QUARTER This bustling corner of Limoges is the heart of the old city. It gets its name from the fortified walls that once enclosed much of the quarter, including the medieval abbey and ducal castle, both long since dismantled. Limoges Top Sights Cathédrale St-Étienne G4 Église St-Michel des Lions C2 Musée des Beaux ArtsG4 Musée National Adrien DubouchéA1 Sights 1 Aquarium du Limousin D4 Chapelle Saint-Aurélien (see 19) 2 Cité des Métiers et des Arts G4 Cour du Temple (see 13) 3 Crypt of St Martial D2 4 Jardin de l'Évêché G4 5 Maison de la Boucherie C4 6Musée de la RésistanceF3 7 Pavillon du Verdurier D3 8 Rue de la Boucherie C3 Sleeping 9 Hôtel de la Paix E2 10 Hôtel Jeanne d'Arc F1 Eating 11 Chez Alphonse C3 Chez François (see 12) 12 Halles Centrales C3 13 La Parenthèse D3 14 L'Amphitryon C4 15 Le 27 D4 Le Bistrot d'Olivier (see 12) 16 Les Petits Ventres C4 17PlanetalisD2 Drinking 18L'Amicale des Parachutistes BelgesD4 19 Le Duc Étienne C4 Entertainment 20 Cinéma Lido F1 21 Grand Écran B1 22 Le Tabernacle D4 Rue de la Boucherie HISTORIC STREET Offline map Google map Just off place St-Aurélien, the pedestrianised rue de la Boucherie – so named because of the butchers’ shops that lined the street in the Middle Ages – contains many of the city’s most attractive medieval half-timbered houses.

E5 Sleeping 16 Allô Logement Temporaire B6 17 Cosmos Hôtel F4 18 Hi Matic G8 19 Hôtel Beaumarchais D5 20 Hôtel Daval E8 21 Hôtel du 7e Art C8 22 Hôtel du Nord – Le Pari Vélo C2 23 Hôtel du Petit Moulin C5 24Hôtel Jeanne d'ArcC7 25 Hôtel Les Jardins du Marais E6 26Le Citizen HotelD1 27 Le Pavillon de la Reine D7 28Maison Internationale de la Jeunesse et des ÉtudiantsC8 29 MIJE Le Fauconnier C8 30 MIJE Maubuisson B7 31 République Hôtel C3 Eating 32 Au Passage E5 33 Bofinger D8 34 Breizh Café C6 35 Chez Marianne B7 36 Derrière A4 37 L'As du Felafel B7 38 Le Chateaubriand E3 39 Le Clown Bar D5 40Le DauphinE3 41 Le Nôtre D8 42 Le Petit Bofinger D8 43 Le Petit Marché D7 44Le Verre VoléC1 45 Marché aux Enfants Rouges C5 46 Marché Bastille E8 47 Nanashi C5 48 Pink Flamingo C6 49 Pink Flamingo D1 50 Pozzetto B7 51 Rose Bakery C5 52SeptimeG8 53 Soya Cantine BIO E3 Drinking 54 3w Kafé B7 55 Café Charbon G4 56 Café Chéri(e) F1 57 Café La Fusée A5 58 Chez Prune D2 59Hôtel du NordD1 60 La Fée Verte G7 61L'AtmosphèreC1 62 Le Barav C4 63 Le Loir dans La Théière C7 64 Le Progrès D5 65 Le Tango B4 66 Open Café B6 67 Panic Room D5 68 Scream Club D3 69 Zéro Zéro D6 Entertainment 70 La Scène Bastille F8 71 Le Balajo E8 72 Le Nouveau Casino G4 Shopping 73 Le Studio des Parfums B7 74 Maison Georges Larnicol C7 75 Marché Belleville G2 76 Mariage Frères B7 77 Merci D6 78 Trésor B7 79 Tumbleweed D7 80 Un Chien dans le Marais B7 Centre Pompidou ART MUSEUM Offline map Google map ( 01 44 78 12 33; www.centrepompidou.fr; place Georges Pompidou, 1er; museum, exhibitions & panorama adult/child €13/free; 11am-9pm Wed-Mon; Rambuteau) Former French President Georges Pompidou wanted an ultracontemporary artistic hub, and he got it: competition-winning architects Renzo Piano and Richard Rogers effectively designed the building inside out, with utilitarian features such as plumbing, pipes, air vents and electrical cables forming part of the external façade, freeing up the interior space for exhibitions and events.

Strasbourg Top Sights Cathédrale Notre-Dame F2 Grande Île E2 Musée d'Art Moderne et ContemporainA4 Petite France C3 Sights 1 Barrage Vauban B3 2 Maison Kammerzell F2 3 Musée Alsacien F4 4Musée de l'Œuvre Notre-DameF3 5 Musée Historique F3 6 Palais Rohan G3 7 Place Gutenberg E3 8 Ponts Couverts C3 Activities, Courses & Tours 9 Batorama G3 Sleeping 10 Cour du Corbeau G4 11 Hôtel Au Cerf d'Or F4 12 Hôtel du Dragon E4 13 Hôtel Gutenberg E3 14 Hôtel Hannong D2 15 Hôtel Le Colmar B1 16 Hôtel Régent Petite France C3 17 Hôtel Suisse G3 18 Le Kléber Hôtel D1 19 Romantik Hôtel Beaucour F4 Eating 20 Au Coin des Pucelles G1 21 Au Crocodile E2 22 Au Petit Tonnelier F3 23Bistrot et ChocolatG3 24Farmers' MarketG3 25 Kobus F3 26 La Cambuse D3 27 La Cloche à Fromage E3 28 La Cloche à Fromage Boutique F3 29 La Tinta C3 30 L'Assiette du Vin E3 31 Le Gavroche G4 32 Le Stras' D3 33 Maison des Tanneurs C3 34Poêles de CarottesC2 35 Umami D3 Drinking 36 Académie de la Bière B2 37 Bar Exils E3 Jeannette et les Cycleux (see 27) Entertainment 38 Boutique Culture F2 39 Fnac Billetterie D2 40 L'Artichaut C2 Le Seven (see 27) 41 Odyssée E2 Shopping 42 Christian E1 43 Coco LM F2 44 Mireille Oster D3 Grande Île HISTORIC QUARTER Offline map Google map ( Langstross) History seeps through the twisting lanes and cafe-rimmed plazas of Grande Île, Strasbourg’s Unesco World Heritage–listed island bordered by the River Ill.


The Art of Computer Programming by Donald Ervin Knuth

Brownian motion, complexity theory, correlation coefficient, Donald Knuth, Eratosthenes, G4S, Georg Cantor, information retrieval, Isaac Newton, iterative process, John von Neumann, Louis Pasteur, mandelbrot fractal, Menlo Park, NP-complete, P = NP, Paul Erdős, probability theory / Blaise Pascal / Pierre de Fermat, RAND corporation, random walk, sorting algorithm, Turing machine, Y2K

., t — 1 and the number of gaps of length > t, until n gaps have been tabulated. Gl. [Initialize.] Set j < 1, s <- 0, and set C0UNT[r] <- 0 for 0 < r < t. G2. [Set r zero.] Set r <- 0. G3. [a < Uj < /??] Increase j by 1. If Uj > a and Uj < C, go to step G5. G4. [Increase r.] Increase r by one, and return to step G3. G5. [Record the gap length.] (A gap of length r has now been found.) If r > t, increase C0UNT[t] by one, otherwise increase C0UNT[r] by one. G6. [n gaps found?] Increase s by one. If s < n, return to step G2. | 3.3.2 EMPIRICAL TESTS 63 Gl. Initialize G2. Set r zero ^G3. G4. Increase r No G6. n gaps found? j<- Yes G5. Record the gap length Yes Fig. 6. Gathering data for the gap test. (Algorithms for the "coupon-collector's test" and the "run test" are similar.) After Algorithm G has been performed, the chi-square test is applied to the k = t + 1 values of C0UNT[0], C0UNT[l], ..., C0UNT[t], using the following probabilities: pr=p(l-p)r, forO<r<*-l; pt = (I - pf D) Here p = E — a is the probability that a <Uj < E.

The tensor element Ujk is the coefficient of uk in uI+J modp(u); and this is the element in row i, column k of the matrix P\ where P = @ 0 0 Vpo 1 0 0 Pi 0 .. 1 .. 0 .. P2 ¦• 0 0 1 ¦ Pn- \ 1/ G3) is called the companion matrix of p(u). (The indices z, j, k in our discussion will run from 0 to n — 1 instead of from 1 to n.) It is convenient to transpose the 4.6.4 EVALUATION OF POLYNOMIALS 513 tensor, for if Tijk = Ukj the individual layers of (T^fc) for k = 0, 1, 2, ..., n — 1 are simply given by the matrices / P P2 ... Pn-\ G4) The first rows of the matrices in G4) are respectively the unit vectors A,0,0,..., 0), @,1,0,..., 0), @,0,1,..., 0), ..., @,0,0,..., 1), hence a linear combination X)fc=o vkPk will be the zero matrix if and only if the coefficients Vk are all zero. Furthermore, most of these linear combinations are actually non- singular matrices, for we have n-l (wo,Wl,... ,wn-i) Y] vkPk = @,0,... ,0) if and only if v(u)w(u) = 0 (modulo p(u)), fc=0 where v(u) = vo + v±u -\ \- vn-1un~1 and w(u) = w0 + Wiu -\ h ^-iu".

We will adopt the convention that in other words, the radix point appears at the left of the positional representation of /. More precisely, the stipulation that we have p-digit numbers means that bpf is an integer, and that -bp < bpf < bp. B) The term "floating binary" implies that b = 2, "floating decimal" implies b = 10, etc. Using excess-50 floating decimal numbers with 8 digits, we can write, for example, Avogadro's number N = G4, +.60225200); Planck's constant h = B4, +.66256000). The two components e and / of a floating point number are called the exponent and the fraction parts, respectively. (Other names are occasionally used for this purpose, notably "characteristic" and "mantissa"; but it is an abuse of terminology to call the fraction part a mantissa, since that term has quite a different meaning in connection with logarithms.


pages: 370 words: 102,823

Rethinking Capitalism: Economics and Policy for Sustainable and Inclusive Growth by Michael Jacobs, Mariana Mazzucato

balance sheet recession, banking crisis, basic income, Bernie Sanders, Bretton Woods, business climate, business cycle, Carmen Reinhart, central bank independence, collaborative economy, complexity theory, conceptual framework, corporate governance, corporate social responsibility, creative destruction, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, crony capitalism, David Ricardo: comparative advantage, decarbonisation, deindustrialization, dematerialisation, Detroit bankruptcy, double entry bookkeeping, Elon Musk, endogenous growth, energy security, eurozone crisis, factory automation, facts on the ground, fiat currency, Financial Instability Hypothesis, financial intermediation, forward guidance, full employment, G4S, Gini coefficient, Growth in a Time of Debt, Hyman Minsky, income inequality, information asymmetry, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Internet of things, investor state dispute settlement, invisible hand, Isaac Newton, Joseph Schumpeter, Kenneth Rogoff, Kickstarter, knowledge economy, labour market flexibility, low skilled workers, Martin Wolf, mass incarceration, Mont Pelerin Society, neoliberal agenda, Network effects, new economy, non-tariff barriers, paradox of thrift, Paul Samuelson, price stability, private sector deleveraging, quantitative easing, QWERTY keyboard, railway mania, rent-seeking, road to serfdom, savings glut, Second Machine Age, secular stagnation, shareholder value, sharing economy, Silicon Valley, Steve Jobs, the built environment, The Great Moderation, The Spirit Level, Thorstein Veblen, too big to fail, total factor productivity, transaction costs, trickle-down economics, universal basic income, very high income

Therefore the market exists only at very separated, discrete points of time when contracts are up for tender. Perhaps most important, what the public authority customer buys is not the substantive service involved, but the terms of the outsourcing contract. Although a large number of firms is engaged in this business across the whole range of public services being traded, the market is dominated by a small number of very large players. In the UK, over recent years, three firms—G4S, Capita and Serco—have come to account for a very large part of the government outsourcing market.7 A small number of purchasers in public authorities faces a small number of suppliers. These are therefore oligopolistic markets. An indicator that the market is not working well is the fact that large firms have continued to win new contracts even after having been fined for dereliction of duty with some of their existing ones.8 Significantly evoking the phrase used about the giant banks that had to be rescued during the financial crisis, one analysis of their operations has suggested that the firms involved in winning contracts to run British public services have become ‘too big to fail’.9 That is, they have become so central to providing Britain’s public services and infrastructure that if they were to leave the market there would be a crisis of collapsing provision.

An indicator that the market is not working well is the fact that large firms have continued to win new contracts even after having been fined for dereliction of duty with some of their existing ones.8 Significantly evoking the phrase used about the giant banks that had to be rescued during the financial crisis, one analysis of their operations has suggested that the firms involved in winning contracts to run British public services have become ‘too big to fail’.9 That is, they have become so central to providing Britain’s public services and infrastructure that if they were to leave the market there would be a crisis of collapsing provision. The observation that these major firms are found across a wide range of disparate activities is also significant. Both G4S and Serco started as contractors for public infrastructure projects in defence and security, but are today involved in schools and care services. Another major player, Amey, started in road building, but is now found right across the range of public administration. That firms so successfully win contracts across fields where they had no past track record or prior professional knowledge is explained by the fact that their core business is not a particular field of activity in which they have expertise, but knowing how to win government contracts: how to bid, and how to develop contacts with officials and politicians.

China Development Bank (CDB) circular economy citizenship goods climate change and capitalism and economics and politics Paris Accord policy Club of Rome Cold War collective goods Compaq compensation contracts competition Japanese law limits perfect competition protected firms and sectors consumerism consumers behaviour benefits choice debt demand protection welfare corporate sector accountability debt financialisation Fortune 500 companies Fortune 1000 companies governance new public management (NPM) organisational models resource allocation D DARPA debt consumer corporate household hysteria private public short-term sovereign debt-to-GDP ratios decarbonisation and structural change democracy and capitalism election campaigns post-democratic politics Department of Defense Department of Energy Department of health developing countries devolution discrimination anti-discrimination laws displacement of peoples Dosi, Giovanni Draghi, Mario E economic and monetary union (EMU) economic growth and inequality and innovation and technology environmental concerns green growth zero growth economic policy and capitalism consensus-building macroeconomic policy monetary expansion reshaping economic theory economic models model of the firm neoclassical orthodox post-Keynesian education access to and skills efficiency employment growth ‘non-standard’ work energy sector storage technologies environmental impacts environmental risk damage degradation sustainability technologies euro zone debt-to-GDP ratio economic policy fiscal policy GDP growth government lending investment macroeconomic conditions private investment productivity growth recession southern countries sovereign debt unemployment European Central Bank (ECB) role European Exchange Rate Mechanism (ERM) European Investment Bank (EIB) proposed new European Fund for Investment European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) European Stability Mechanism European Union (EU) competition law debt-to-GDP ratio de-industrialisation GDP growth government lending Growth Compact investment-led recovery macroeconomic conditions monetary expansion policy framework private investment productivity growth Stability and Growth Pact unemployment executive pay F Federal Reserve financial crash of 1929 financial crash of 2008 financial markets borrowing discrimination efficient markets hypothesis mispricing short-termism systemic risks financial regulation Finland public innovation research and development universal basic income firms business models in perfect competition productive firm First World War fiscal austerity fiscal compact fiscal consolidation fiscal deficits fiscal policy fiscal tightening food insecurity Forstater, Matthew Fortune 500 companies Fortune 1000 firms fossil fuels fracking France average real wage index labour productivity growth private debt public deficit unemployment Freeman, Chris Friedman, Milton G G4S Gates, Bill Germany average real wage index GDP green technology investment state investment bank unemployment wages global financial system globalisation and welfare state asymmetric first golden age Godley, Wynne Goldman Sachs Goodfriend, Marvin Google governments and innovation deficits failures intervention by modernisation of risk-taking Graham, Benjamin Great Depression Greece austerity bailouts debt problems GDP investment activity public deficit unemployment green technology green direction for innovation greenhouse gas emissions Greenspan, Alan Grubb, Michael H Hatzius, Jan health and climate change older people Hirschman, Albert history Integration with theory home mortgage specialists household income housing purchases value I IBM income distribution industrial revolution inequality adverse effects and economic performance China ethnicity explanation for income international trend OECD countries opportunities redistributive policies reinforcement reversing rise taxation UK wealth inflation information and communications technologies (ICT) consumer demand green direction internet of things online education planned obsolescence innovation and climate change and companies and government and growth innovative enterprise path-dependence public sector institutions European financial role Intel interest rates and quantitative easing Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD) International Energy Agency (IEA) International Labour Organization (ILO) International Monetary Fund (IMF) Studies investment and theory of the firm crowding out decline in investment in innovation private private vs publicly owned firms public public–private investment partnerships investment-led growth Ireland debt problems investment activity Public deficit Israel public venture capital fund research and development Italy average real wage index debt problems GDP Income inequality unemployment J Japan average real wage index competitive advantage over US GDP wages Jobs, Steve Juncker, Jean-Claude K Kay Review Keynes, John Maynard KfW Knight, Frank Koo, Richard Krueger, Alan Krugman, Paul L labour markets insecurity of regulation structures United States labour productivity and wages declining growth public deficit unemployment Lehman Brothers Lerner, Abba liquidity crisis Lloyd George, David lobbying corporate M Maastricht Treaty Malthus, Thomas market economy theory markets behaviour failure uncertainty Marshall, Alfred Marx, Karl McCulley, Paul Merrill Lynch Mill, John Stuart Minsky, Hyman mission oriented investment monetary policy money and fiscal policy and macroeconomic policy bank money electronic transactions endogenous exogenous fiat money government bonds IOUs modern money theory quantity theory theories monopolies monopoly rents natural Moore, Gordon N NASA nanotechnology National Health Service (NHS) National Institutes of Health (NIH) national savings neoliberalism corporate Newman, Frank Newton, Isaac O Obama, Barack P patents patient capital patient finance see patient capital Penrose, Edith Piketty, Thomas PIMCO Pisano, Gary Polanyi, Karl Portugal austerity bailout debt problems GDP investment activity unemployment privatisation productivity marginal productivity theory productive firm unproductive firm – see also labour productivity public deficits public goods public organisations and change public policy and change evaluation role public service outsourcing public spending public–private investment partnerships Q quantitative easing quarterly capitalism R Reagan, Ronald recessions Reinhart, Carmen renewable energy policy rents and banks increase rent-seeking research and development (R&D) state organisations Ricardo, David risk-taking – mitigation of risk role of the state Rogoff, Kenneth Roosevelt, Franklin D.


Lonely Planet Pocket San Francisco by Lonely Planet, Alison Bing

Albert Einstein, back-to-the-land, Bay Area Rapid Transit, Burning Man, Chuck Templeton: OpenTable:, edge city, G4S, game design, Golden Gate Park, Haight Ashbury, Mason jar, Silicon Valley, stealth mode startup, Stewart Brand, transcontinental railway, Zipcar

Golden Gate Park & the Avenues Top Sights California Academy of Sciences G3 MH de Young Memorial Museum F3 Sights 1 Legion of Honor B1 2 Ocean Beach A4 3 Strybing Arboretum & Botanical Gardens F4 4 Japanese Tea Garden F3 5 Conservatory of Flowers G3 6 Stow Lake E4 7 Lincoln Park B1 8 Sutro Baths A2 Eating 9 Aziza E2 10 Namu G2 11 Outerlands B5 12 Ton Kiang E2 13 Kabuto F2 14 Spruce H1 15 Thanh Long B5 16 Spices G2 17 Halu G2 18 Genki G1 Drinking 19 Beach Chalet Brewery A4 20 Hollow F4 21 Trouble Coffee B5 22 540 Club G2 23 Social G4 24 Bitter End G2 25 Trad'r Sam's D2 Entertainment 26 Plough & Stars G2 27 Bridge Theater H2 28 Four Star Theatre D2 Shopping 29 Park Life G2 30 Mollusk B5 31 General Store B5 32 Green Apple G2 33 Wishbone G4 34 Seedstore G2 Top Sights California Academy of Sciences Offline map www.calacademy.org 55 Music Concourse Dr, inside Golden Gate Park adult/child $29.95/24.95 9:30am-5pm Mon-Sat, 11am-5pm Sat 9th Ave Leave it to San Francisco to dedicate a glorious four-story monument entirely to freaks of nature.


pages: 874 words: 154,810

Lonely Planet Florence & Tuscany by Lonely Planet, Virginia Maxwell, Nicola Williams

Bonfire of the Vanities, call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, centre right, Costa Concordia, G4S, haute couture, Kickstarter, period drama, post-work, Skype, trade route

The Duomo & Santa Maria Novella Top Sights 1 Battistero di San Giovanni F3 2 Corridoio Vasariano F7 3 Duomo H3 4 Grande Museo del Duomo H2 5 Palazzo Vecchio G6 6 Ponte Vecchio E7 7 Uffizi Gallery G7 Sights 8 Basilica di San Lorenzo F1 9Basilica di Santa Maria Novella - EntranceC2 10Basilica e Chiostri Monumentali di Santa Maria NovellaC1 11 Biblioteca Medicea Laurenziana F1 12 Cappella dei Magi G1 13 Cappelle Medicee E1 14Chiesa dei Santissimi ApostoliD6 15 Chiesa di San Gaetano D3 16 Chiesa di Santa Margherita H4 17 Chiesa di Santa Trìnita D5 18 Chiesa d'Ognissanti A3 19 Chiesa e Museo di OrsanmicheleF5 Fontana di Nettuno (see 30) 20 Gucci Museo H6 21Il PorcellinoF6 22 Museo Casa di Dante H4 23 Museo di Palazzo Davanzati E5 24 Museo Marino Marini C4 25 Museo Salvatore Ferragamo D6 26 Palazzo Antinori D3 27 Palazzo Medici-Riccardi G1 28 Palazzo Strozzi D4 29 Piazza della Repubblica F4 30 Piazza della Signoria G6 31 Torre dei Marsili D7 32 Via de' Tornabuoni D4 Activities, Courses & Tours 33 ArtViva E5 34 Florence Town G5 35 Italy by Segway G5 Sleeping 36 Academy Hostel G2 37 Antica Torre di Via de' Tornabuoni 1D6 38 Hotel Cestelli D6 39 Hotel Davanzati E5 40 Hotel L'O C2 41 Hotel Perseo F2 42 Hotel Scoti D5 43 Hotel Torre Guelfa E6 44 Palazzo Magnani Feroni A6 45 Palazzo Vecchietti E4 Eating 46 Cantinetta dei Verrazzano G5 47 Da Vinattieri H4 48 Grom G3 49 I Due Fratellini G5 50 Il Latini C4 51 Il Ristoro E7 52 Il Santo Bevitore A6 53 'Ino F7 54 La Canova di Gustavino G5 55 La Carraia A6 56 L'Antico Trippaio G4 57 L'Osteria di Giovanni B4 58 Mariano D5 59 Momoyama A6 60 Obikà D4 61 Olio & Convivium C7 62 Osteria Il Buongustai G5 63 Tic Toc G4 64 Trattoria Camillo C7 Drinking & Nightlife 65 Caffè Concerto Paszkowski F4 66 Caffè Giacosa D4 67 Caffè Rivoire F6 68 Colle Bereto E4 69 Coquinarius G3 70 Cuculia A7 71 Fiaschetteria Nuvoli F3 72 GilliF4 Gucci Museo Caffè (see 20) 73 Il Santino B6 74 La Terrazza F7 75 La Terrazza F4 76 Le Renaissance Café D4 77 Procacci D4 78 Sei Divino A4 79 Slowly E5 Entertainment 80 Blop Club H6 81 La Cité A6 82 Space Club A2 83 YAB E5 Shopping 84 A Piedi Nudi nel Parco H4 85 Alberto Cozzi C5 86 Alessandro Gherardeschi B5 Angela Caputi (see 43) 87 Aprosio & Co C4 88 Desii Lab C4 89 Dolce Forte B2 90 Fabriano Boutique G4 91 Francesco da Firenze A6 92 Grevi D4 93 Gucci D4 94 La Bottega dell'Olio E6 95 Le Gare 24 A4 96 Letizia Fiorini C5 97 Loretta Caponi D3 98Mercato de San LorenzoF1 99 Mercato Nuovo F5 100 Mio Concept C4 101 Obsequium D7 102 Officina Profumo-Farmaceutica di Santa Maria NovellaB2 103 Patrizia Pepe E4 104 Pineider G5 Uffizi Gallery ART MUSEUM MAP GOOGLE MAP (www.polomuseale.firenze.it; Piazzale degli Uffizi 6; adult/reduced €6.50/3.25; 8.15am-6.50pm Tue-Sun) The jewel in Florence’s crown, the Uffizi fills the vast U-shaped Palazzo degli Uffizi.

The Duomo & Santa Maria Novella Top Sights 1 Battistero di San Giovanni F3 2 Corridoio Vasariano F7 3 Duomo H3 4 Grande Museo del Duomo H2 5 Palazzo Vecchio G6 6 Ponte Vecchio E7 7 Uffizi Gallery G7 Sights 8 Basilica di San Lorenzo F1 9Basilica di Santa Maria Novella - EntranceC2 10Basilica e Chiostri Monumentali di Santa Maria NovellaC1 11 Biblioteca Medicea Laurenziana F1 12 Cappella dei Magi G1 13 Cappelle Medicee E1 14Chiesa dei Santissimi ApostoliD6 15 Chiesa di San Gaetano D3 16 Chiesa di Santa Margherita H4 17 Chiesa di Santa Trìnita D5 18 Chiesa d'Ognissanti A3 19 Chiesa e Museo di OrsanmicheleF5 Fontana di Nettuno (see 30) 20 Gucci Museo H6 21Il PorcellinoF6 22 Museo Casa di Dante H4 23 Museo di Palazzo Davanzati E5 24 Museo Marino Marini C4 25 Museo Salvatore Ferragamo D6 26 Palazzo Antinori D3 27 Palazzo Medici-Riccardi G1 28 Palazzo Strozzi D4 29 Piazza della Repubblica F4 30 Piazza della Signoria G6 31 Torre dei Marsili D7 32 Via de' Tornabuoni D4 Activities, Courses & Tours 33 ArtViva E5 34 Florence Town G5 35 Italy by Segway G5 Sleeping 36 Academy Hostel G2 37 Antica Torre di Via de' Tornabuoni 1D6 38 Hotel Cestelli D6 39 Hotel Davanzati E5 40 Hotel L'O C2 41 Hotel Perseo F2 42 Hotel Scoti D5 43 Hotel Torre Guelfa E6 44 Palazzo Magnani Feroni A6 45 Palazzo Vecchietti E4 Eating 46 Cantinetta dei Verrazzano G5 47 Da Vinattieri H4 48 Grom G3 49 I Due Fratellini G5 50 Il Latini C4 51 Il Ristoro E7 52 Il Santo Bevitore A6 53 'Ino F7 54 La Canova di Gustavino G5 55 La Carraia A6 56 L'Antico Trippaio G4 57 L'Osteria di Giovanni B4 58 Mariano D5 59 Momoyama A6 60 Obikà D4 61 Olio & Convivium C7 62 Osteria Il Buongustai G5 63 Tic Toc G4 64 Trattoria Camillo C7 Drinking & Nightlife 65 Caffè Concerto Paszkowski F4 66 Caffè Giacosa D4 67 Caffè Rivoire F6 68 Colle Bereto E4 69 Coquinarius G3 70 Cuculia A7 71 Fiaschetteria Nuvoli F3 72 GilliF4 Gucci Museo Caffè (see 20) 73 Il Santino B6 74 La Terrazza F7 75 La Terrazza F4 76 Le Renaissance Café D4 77 Procacci D4 78 Sei Divino A4 79 Slowly E5 Entertainment 80 Blop Club H6 81 La Cité A6 82 Space Club A2 83 YAB E5 Shopping 84 A Piedi Nudi nel Parco H4 85 Alberto Cozzi C5 86 Alessandro Gherardeschi B5 Angela Caputi (see 43) 87 Aprosio & Co C4 88 Desii Lab C4 89 Dolce Forte B2 90 Fabriano Boutique G4 91 Francesco da Firenze A6 92 Grevi D4 93 Gucci D4 94 La Bottega dell'Olio E6 95 Le Gare 24 A4 96 Letizia Fiorini C5 97 Loretta Caponi D3 98Mercato de San LorenzoF1 99 Mercato Nuovo F5 100 Mio Concept C4 101 Obsequium D7 102 Officina Profumo-Farmaceutica di Santa Maria NovellaB2 103 Patrizia Pepe E4 104 Pineider G5 Uffizi Gallery ART MUSEUM MAP GOOGLE MAP (www.polomuseale.firenze.it; Piazzale degli Uffizi 6; adult/reduced €6.50/3.25; 8.15am-6.50pm Tue-Sun) The jewel in Florence’s crown, the Uffizi fills the vast U-shaped Palazzo degli Uffizi.

Oltrarno & Boboli Top Sights 1 Basilica di Santo Spirito C2 2 Cappella Brancacci A1 3 Giardino di Boboli E3 4 Palazzo Pitti D3 Sights 5 Appartamenti Reali D3 6 Basilica di Santa Maria del Carmine A1 7 Casa Guidi C3 8 Cenacolo di Santo Spirito C2 9 Chiesa di Santa Felicità E2 10 Forte di Belvedere F4 11 Galleria d'Arte Moderna D3 12 Galleria del Costume D3 13 Galleria PalatinaD3 14 Giardino Bardini G3 15 Giardino Torrigiani A4 16 Grotta del Buontalenti E2 17 Museo degli Argenti D2 18 Museo delle Porcellane E5 19 Museo di Storia Naturale - Zoologia La SpecolaB3 20 Museo Galileo F1 21 Museo Roberto Capucci G4 22 Palazzo de' Mozzi G3 23 Torre de' Belfredelli D1 24 Via de' Bardi G2 Activities, Courses & Tours 25 In Tavola C2 Sleeping 26 Hostel Santa Monaca A1 27 Hotel La Scaletta D2 28 Palazzo Guadagni Hotel B2 Eating 29 Gustapanino C2 30 Gustapizza C2 31 Il Magazzino D1 32 La Casalinga C2 33 Tamerò C2 34 Trattoria 4 Leoni D2 Drinking & Nightlife 35 Dolce Vita A1 36 Le Volpi e l'Uva E2 37 Open Bar E1 38 Vivanda B1 39 Volume C2 40 Zoé H3 Shopping 41 Alessandro Dari H3 42 Casini Firenze D2 43 Giulio Giannini e Figlio D2 44 Lorenzo Villoresi G3 45 Madova E1 Ponte Vecchio BRIDGE MAP GOOGLE MAP The first documentation of a stone bridge here, at the narrowest crossing point along the entire length of the Arno, dates from 972.


Top 10 Prague by Schwinke, Theodore.

centre right, Defenestration of Prague, G4S, Johannes Kepler, New Urbanism

The most chilling area is the reconstructed interrogation room. Although locals might not agree, the tour is more fun than it sounds (see p37). recalls the Red Army’s liberation of Prague in 1945: a grateful resistance fighter greets a Soviet footsoldier with a bunch of lilac and a, presumably brotherly, kiss. It’s one of the few pro-Soviet monuments still standing in Prague. d Vrchlického sady • Map G4 Museum of Communism 49 Prague’s Top 10 Left Poster, Wax Museum Praha Right National Marionette Theatre Eccentric Prague of Torture ! Museum Instruments If you can’t quite grasp how these grisly instruments work, the helpful illustrations should make their operation painfully clear. More than 60 implements of pain from all over Europe are on display, accompanied by explanations in four languages. d Křižovnické námětí 1 • Map J4 • Open 10am–10pm daily (to 8pm in winter) • Adm Museum Praha £ Wax Bohemia’s great figures all come together in one happy community here, with lifelike waxwork representations of Franz Kafka, Rudolf II and The Good Soldier Švejk, making for a wonderful stroll through Czech history.

Its aim is to make art more accessible to the general public by striving to establish a relationship between the two. d Národní třída 30 • Map L6 • Open 1–7pm Mon, 1–6pm Tue–Sun £ Postage Stamp Museum Philatelists’ mouths water over this one. Its exhibitions illustrate the colourful history of postage stamps in the Czech Republic and Europe. Sells commemorative sheets and graphic works too. d Nové mlýny 2 • Map G4 • Open 9am–noon, 1–5pm Tue–Sun • Adm of the $ Museum City of Prague Visitors can explore 19th-century Prague with Antonín Langweil’s scaled replica of the city. d Na 110 Museum * National Palaeontology, mineralogy and a host of other “ologies”. The museum’s collections are scattered throughout the country, but the Wenceslas Square edifice is a cultural artifact in its own right (see p36). d Václavské náměstí 68 • Map G5 • Open Oct–Apr: 9am–5pm daily; May–Sep: 10am–6pm (closed first Tue of month) • Adm Museum ( Police The museum documents the police’s efforts with engaging exhibits, such as an interactive crime scene. d Ke Karlovu 1 • Map Poříčí 52 • Map P3 • Open 9am–6pm Tue–Sun • Adm G6 • Open 10am–5pm Tue–Sun • Adm Museum % Mucha Art Nouveau artist Alfons Museum ) Dvořák This Baroque palace houses Mucha is a national hero.


pages: 462 words: 172,671

Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship by Robert C. Martin

continuous integration, database schema, domain-specific language, don't repeat yourself, Donald Knuth, en.wikipedia.org, Eratosthenes, finite state, G4S, Ignaz Semmelweis: hand washing, iterative process, place-making, Rubik’s Cube, web application

Args: The Rough Draft So I Stopped On Incrementalism String Arguments Conclusion Chapter 15: JUnit Internals The JUnit Framework Conclusion Chapter 16: Refactoring SerialDate First, Make It Work Then Make It Right Conclusion Bibliography Chapter 17: Smells and Heuristics Comments C1: Inappropriate Information C2: Obsolete Comment C3: Redundant Comment C4: Poorly Written Comment C5: Commented-Out Code Environment E1: Build Requires More Than One Step E2: Tests Require More Than One Step Functions F1: Too Many Arguments F2: Output Arguments F3: Flag Arguments F4: Dead Function General G1: Multiple Languages in One Source File G2: Obvious Behavior Is Unimplemented G3: Incorrect Behavior at the Boundaries G4: Overridden Safeties G5: Duplication G6: Code at Wrong Level of Abstraction G7: Base Classes Depending on Their Derivatives G8: Too Much Information G9: Dead Code G10: Vertical Separation G11: Inconsistency G12: Clutter G13: Artificial Coupling G14: Feature Envy G15: Selector Arguments G16: Obscured Intent G17: Misplaced Responsibility G18: Inappropriate Static G19: Use Explanatory Variables G20: Function Names Should Say What They Do G21: Understand the Algorithm G22: Make Logical Dependencies Physical G23: Prefer Polymorphism to If/Else or Switch/Case G24: Follow Standard Conventions G25: Replace Magic Numbers with Named Constants G26: Be Precise G27: Structure over Convention G28: Encapsulate Conditionals G29: Avoid Negative Conditionals G30: Functions Should Do One Thing G31: Hidden Temporal Couplings G32: Don’t Be Arbitrary G33: Encapsulate Boundary Conditions G34: Functions Should Descend Only One Level of Abstraction G35: Keep Configurable Data at High Levels G36: Avoid Transitive Navigation Java J1: Avoid Long Import Lists by Using Wildcards J2: Don’t Inherit Constants J3: Constants versus Enums Names N1: Choose Descriptive Names N2: Choose Names at the Appropriate Level of Abstraction N3: Use Standard Nomenclature Where Possible N4: Unambiguous Names N5: Use Long Names for Long Scopes N6: Avoid Encodings N7: Names Should Describe Side-Effects.

If we change it, then any DayDate written with an older version of the software won’t be readable anymore and will result in an InvalidClassException. If you don’t declare the serialVersionUID variable, then the compiler automatically generates one for you, and it will be different every time you make a change to the module. I know that all the documents recommend manual control of this variable, but it seems to me that automatic control of serialization is a lot safer [G4]. After all, I’d much rather debug an InvalidClassException than the odd behavior that would ensue if I forgot to change the serialVersionUID. So I’m going to delete the variable—at least for the time being.2 2. Several of the reviewers of this text have taken exception to this decision. They contend that in an open source framework it is better to assert manual control over the serial ID so that minor changes to the software don’t cause old serialized dates to be invalid.

Developers often write functions that they think will work, and then trust their intuition rather than going to the effort to prove that their code works in all the corner and boundary cases. There is no replacement for due diligence. Every boundary condition, every corner case, every quirk and exception represents something that can confound an elegant and intuitive algorithm. Don’t rely on your intuition. Look for every boundary condition and write a test for it. G4: Overridden Safeties Chernobyl melted down because the plant manager overrode each of the safety mechanisms one by one. The safeties were making it inconvenient to run an experiment. The result was that the experiment did not get run, and the world saw it’s first major civilian nuclear catastrophe. It is risky to override safeties. Exerting manual control over serialVersionUID may be necessary, but it is always risky.


pages: 398 words: 105,917

Bean Counters: The Triumph of the Accountants and How They Broke Capitalism by Richard Brooks

accounting loophole / creative accounting, asset-backed security, banking crisis, Big bang: deregulation of the City of London, blockchain, BRICs, British Empire, business process, cloud computing, collapse of Lehman Brothers, collateralized debt obligation, corporate governance, corporate raider, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, David Strachan, Deng Xiaoping, Donald Trump, double entry bookkeeping, Double Irish / Dutch Sandwich, energy security, Etonian, eurozone crisis, financial deregulation, forensic accounting, Frederick Winslow Taylor, G4S, intangible asset, Internet of things, James Watt: steam engine, joint-stock company, joint-stock limited liability company, Joseph Schumpeter, light touch regulation, Long Term Capital Management, low cost airline, new economy, Northern Rock, offshore financial centre, oil shale / tar sands, On the Economy of Machinery and Manufactures, Ponzi scheme, post-oil, principal–agent problem, profit motive, race to the bottom, railway mania, regulatory arbitrage, risk/return, Ronald Reagan, savings glut, short selling, Silicon Valley, South Sea Bubble, statistical model, supply-chain management, The Chicago School, too big to fail, transaction costs, transfer pricing, Upton Sinclair, WikiLeaks

Those above them, who led the Big Four and set their cultures, have been garlanded and appointed to the boards of the world’s most powerful companies, including its largest banks. The worldwide chairman of RBS’s auditor Deloitte until 2007, William Parrett, moved swiftly onto the board of Swiss bank UBS to run its audit committee. The firm’s UK senior partner and Parrett’s successor internationally until 2011, John Connolly, became chairman of controversial outsourced public service provider G4S. He in turn was succeeded as Deloitte worldwide chairman by Steve Almond, the lead auditor on Royal Bank of Scotland between 2005 and 2009. PwC’s British leader in the years up to and after the Northern Rock collapse, Kieran Poynter, retired in 2008 and glided into the boardrooms of British American Tobacco and the holding company for British Airways. The firm’s US boss while it signed off multi-billion-dollar discrepancies in values of derivatives for AIG and Goldman Sachs, Dennis Nally, became its worldwide chairman in 2009.

Other more economical and effective incremental changes – never mind the status quo – do not. There’s no money in stability. The companies that benefit from the consultants’ advice to government bodies by providing the duly outsourced services certainly appreciate the importance of the Big Four. The former lead UK partners of Deloitte (John Connolly) and PwC (Sir Ian Powell) are now chairmen of two of the largest outsourced public service providers, G4S and Capita respectively. When the latter announced its catch in 2016, it was struggling with badly performing public service contracts and a tumbling share price. Powell, it reassured shareholders, had ‘led PwC’s interactions with the UK government and other public sector organizations’.45 His contacts both in Whitehall and in the accountancy firm advising it clearly made him the man to have at the helm.

., 4, 7, 11, 74, 102–8, 113, 117 and consultancy arms, sale of, 262 and mark-to-market, 99–102, 113 and regulation, 6, 10, 122, 162, 222, 274, 279 Ernst & Ernst, 63, 71, 87 Ernst & Whinney, 86, 87 Ernst & Young, 2, 56, 91, 97, 132–3, 148–9 alumni system, 17 and Anglo Irish Bank, 144 Arthur Andersen structured finance purchase (2002), 121 ‘Building a Better Working World’, 12 and Civil Service Awards, 200 and Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission, 145 global operations, 236 government, advice to, 180, 187, 199, 202 and HealthSouth, 109 and Hong Kong protests (2014), 251–2 integrated reporting, 18 in Japan, 240–41 and Lehman Brothers, 12, 13, 132–3, 145, 148–9 and limited liability partnerships, 94, 95 and Lincoln Savings and Loan, 86–7 mark-to-model, 124 Panama Papers scandal (2016), 247 and private finance initiative (PFI), 187 and Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (PCAOB), 144–5 ‘Quality in Everything We Do’, 12 revolving door, 206, 207, 208 and securitization, 121 and Sino-Forest, 244 Tate sponsorship, 16 and tax avoidance, 7, 156–7, 162, 180, 182, 246, 247 tax policy development team, 180, 199 thought leadership, 12 and VAT avoidance, 7 and Warner, 224 Weinberger’s leadership, 17–18 and World Economic Forum, 17 European Central Bank, 10 European Commission, 170, 253–5, 268, 280 European Union (EU), 168, 170, 203, 253–5 eurozone, 273 Evans, Jonathan, 207 Evening Standard, 256 Everson, Mark, 159 executive pay, 76 ‘expectations gap’, 65, 257 ‘Eye of the Tiger’ (Survivor), 103 Facebook, 164 fair value, 123–5, 126 Fairhead, Rona, 230 Faisaliah Tower, Riyadh, 217 Falcon 900 jets, 100–101 Farah, Mohamed ‘Mo’, 196 Farrar, Michael, 208 Fastow, Andrew, 101–3, 104–5, 108, 109 Federal National Mortgage Association (‘Fannie Mae’), 118–19, 145, 257 Federal Reserve, 122, 133 Federal Trade Commission, 79 Fiat, 170 Fibonacci, Leonardo, 21–2, 32 FIFA (Fédération Internationale de Football Association), 219–28 Fife, Scotland, 48 Financial Conduct Authority, 140, 149, 281 financial crisis (2007–8), x, 4, 7, 10, 13–14, 18, 111–50, 210, 253, 256–9, 265 American International Group bailout, 133–5, 144, 145, 148 Anglo Irish Bank bailout, 144 Bear Stearns bailout, 139, 145 and China, 111 Fannie Mae crisis, 118–19, 145, 257 HBOS bailout, x, 140–41, 142–3, 149, 257 Lehman Brothers collapse, 12, 13, 92, 131–3, 138, 144, 145, 148–9 and IAS39 rules, 123–5, 126, 127, 147 and mark-to-market, 129–31 New Century Financial Corporation collapse, 115–18, 257 Northern Rock collapse, 125–9, 142–3, 148 Royal Bank of Scotland bailout, 47, 136–40, 142, 241 and securitization, 119–23, 129–31, 133–40, 265 and subprime mortgages, x, 10, 36, 48, 111–22, 126, 130, 133, 136, 142, 274 Washington Mutual collapse, 145 Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission, 134, 135, 144, 145 Financial Reporting Council, 138, 142, 144, 149, 182, 209–10, 213–14, 259, 261 Financial Services Authority, 127, 128, 137, 138, 140 Financial Times, 17, 94, 169, 275 Finland, 246 First World War (1914–18), 71 Flint, Douglas, 229 FLIP (Foreign Leveraged Investment Program), 159, 162, 181 Florence, Republic of (1115–1532), 16, 21, 25, 26–32 Flynn, Timothy, 149 Ford, 71, 181 Ford, Henry, 71 Fortune, 62 fossil fuels, 18 Foul! (Jennings), 224 Foxley, Ian, 214, 216 France, 31, 46, 89, 127, 171–7, 204, 205 Franklin, Benjamin, 53 Friedman, Milton, 84 FTSE100 Index, 5, 14, 90, 125 FTSE350 Index, 259 Fuld, Richard ‘Dick’, 132 Future Strategic Tanker Aircraft, 189 G4S, 148, 201 Galbraith, John Kenneth, 14, 57, 263 Galbraith, Thomas, 2nd Baron Strathclyde, 208 Galilei, Galileo, 22 Gap, 163 Gauke, David, 179 Gazprom, 236, 237 GCHQ (Government Communications Headquarters), 272 General Electric, 5–6, 55, 78, 154 General Electric Company (GEC), 66 General Motors, 57 General Survey Outline, 75 generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP), 109 Geneva, Switzerland, 27, 29, 178 geometry, 21, 33 Germany, 220, 233–4, 235, 240, 247, 251 Gilbert, William Schwenck, 52 Gilby, Nicholas, 215 Gladstone, William, 45, 47, 50 Glasgow, Scotland, 45, 48 City of Glasgow Bank, 51, 147 Institute of Accountants and Actuaries, 47 University of Glasgow, 136 Glass–Steagall Act (1933), 60 GlaxoSmithKline, 163, 167, 169 Glickauf, Joseph, 77–8 ‘Go-Go’ years (1960s), 59, 62, 65, 67 Goerdeler, Reinhard, ix, 235, 240 von Goethe, Johann Wolfgang, 235 Gol, 242–3 Goldman Sachs, 121, 134–5, 139, 148, 157 Goldsmith, James, 66, 86 goodwill, 60–61 Goodwin, Fred, 136, 137, 139 Google, 164, 165, 178, 271 Gordhan, Pravin, 250 Gordon Riots (1780), 38 Gordon, Andrew, 218 Gosling, Richard, 202 GPT, 214–19 Gramegna, Pierre, 170 Great Crash and Depression (1929–39), 14, 57–8, 59–60, 66, 73, 75, 80, 118 Great Northern Railway, 46 Great Western Railway, 46 Green, Philip, 260 Greenspan, Alan, 122 Greenwich Capital Markets Inc., 136 Griffith-Jones, John, 146, 149, 150 Grigsby, John, 39, 40–41 Grondona, Julio, 225, 227 Grosvenor Street, Mayfair, ix–x, x, 277–8 Guardian, 170, 213 Gupta, Atul, 250 Haddrill, Stephen, 143, 209, 210 Halet, Raphaël, 171–7, 176, 181 Halet, Sophie, 172, 173 Halifax, 140 Hamersley, Michael, 161 Hamilton, Lewis, 7 Hamilton, Robert, 70 Hanson, Walter, 64 Harley, Robert, 39 Harris, Steven, 264 Hartnett, David, 166, 207 Harvard University, 57, 75, 99 Haskins & Sells, 56, 58 Haskins, Charles Waldo, 56 Haughey, Charles, 163 Haute Comité de la Place Financière, 171 Havelange, João, 220, 221 HBOS, x, 13, 140–41, 142–3, 149, 150, 257 Healey, Denis, 184 HealthSouth, 109 hedge funds, 113, 115 hedging, 99 Heineken, 246 Heintz, Guy, 175 Her Majesty’s Revenue and Customs (HMRC), 179, 182 Hewitt, Patricia, 184 Hexham General Hospital, Northumbria, 191 HIH, 240 Hinchingbrooke hospital, Cambridgeshire, 193 Hinkley Point, Somerset, 204–6 Hippocratic oath, 276 Hodge, Margaret, 178 Hollinger, 154–5 Holocaust, 4 Holyland, William Hopkins, 49 Home Office, 201 Hong Kong, 240, 251–2 Hotel Baur au Lac, Zurich, 219, 224 House of Commons, 68 House of Lords, 68, 92, 93, 143, 146–7 Houston, Texas, 99–108 HS2, 197–9, 266 HSBC, 166, 215, 229–30, 231, 256 Hudson, George, 44–5 humanism, 28 Hungary, 213 hypothetical future value, 100 IBM, 82, 272 Iceland, 127 ICI, 69 IKEA, 166 Illinois, United States, 54, 72–4 Imperial College, London, 197 Imperial Tobacco, 202 income tax, 46, 67, 153 Income Tax Act (1842), 46 India, 233, 238, 242, 245, 249 Industrial Revolution, 18, 42–7 Inferno (Dante), 33 inflation, 85 Inglis, John, 78–9 Institute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales (ICAEW), 49, 52, 93, 210 integrated reporting, 18 interest rates, 85 Internal Revenue Service (IRS), 159, 160 International Accounting Congress (1938), 234 International Accounting Standards Board, 123–5, 126, 127, 147 International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, 169, 230, 247 International Financial Services Centre, 163 International Fiscal Association, 245 International Integrated Reporting Council, 18 International Monetary Fund (IMF), 273 International Sport & Leisure (ISL), 220–21, 222 Internet, 95 Introduction to Merchandise (Hamilton), 70 Iran, 230 Iraq, 225, 240 Ireland, 127, 143–4, 163–5 Isle of Man, 247–8 Issuers’ and Investors’ Summit on CDOs/Credit Derivatives (2006), 121 Istace, Vinciane, 173 Italy, 3, 16, 21–2, 24–36, 37, 239 ITT Corporation, 59, 61 Ivy League, 68 J.


Egypt Travel Guide by Lonely Planet

call centre, carbon footprint, Eratosthenes, friendly fire, G4S, haute cuisine, Khartoum Gordon, late fees, low cost airline, low cost carrier, spice trade, sustainable-tourism, Thales and the olive presses, trade route, urban planning, urban sprawl

Regardless of your travelling style, the Red Sea never fails to impress and is one of the top highlights of any trip to Egypt. Diving the Red Sea Dive Sites 1 Alternatives E6 2 Amphoras F6 3 Bells G4 4 Big Brother C5 Blue Hole (see 3) 5 Bluff Point E6 Canyon (see 8) 6 Daedalus C7 7 Dunraven E6 8 Eel Garden G4 9 El Kaf B6 10 El Qadim B5 11 Elphinstone B6 12 Gabr el-Bint F5 13 Gardens F6 14 Giftun Islands E7 15 Gordon Reef F6 16 Gota Abu Ramada D7 17 Hamada C8 18 Islands F5 19 Jackfish Alley F6 20 Jackson Reef F6 Jolanda Reef (see 35) Kingston (see 33) Little Brother (see 4) 21 Panorama Reef B4 22 Ras Mumlach G4 23 Ras Shaitan G3 24 Ras UmSid F6 25 Ras Za’atir F6 26 Rocky Island D8 27 SalemExpress B5 28 Sataya (Dolphin Reef) D8 29 Sha’ab Abu Nuhas E6 30 Sha’ab al-Erg E6 31 Sha’ab Samadai C7 32 Sha’ab Sharm C7 33 Shag Rock D5 34 Shark Observatory F6 35 Shark Reef E6 36 Sinker G3 37 Siyul Kebira E6 38 Small Crack E6 Stingray Station (see 1) 39 Thistlegorm D5 40 Thomas Reef F6 41 Tower F6 Turtle Bay (see 2) 42 Umm Qamar E7 43 Umm Sid F5 44 Zabargad Island D8 When to Dive The Red Sea can be dived year-round, though diving conditions are at their peak during the summer months of July to September.

Mohandiseen, Agouza & Zamalek Sights Cario Marriot(see 5) Gezira Arts Centre(see 1) 1 Museum of Islamic Ceramics G6 Activities, Courses & Tours 2 Atlas Zamalek Hotel C6 3 Nabila Hotel C5 4 Samia Allouba Dance & Fitness Centre A7 Sleeping 5 Cairo Marriott H6 6 Golden Tulip Flamenco Hotel F3 7 Hotel Longchamps F4 8 Mayfair Hotel G5 Eating 9 Abou El Sid H5 10 Abu Ammar al-Suri A7 11 Alfa Market F4 12 Al-Omda C6 13At-Tabei ad-DumyatiB7 14BarakaG5 15 Cedars A6 16 Didos Al Dente F2 17 Five Bells F3 La Bodega (see 31) 18 La Mezzaluna G5 19 La Taverna F4 20 L'Aubergine G5 21 Maison Thomas H5 22Makani (Mohandeseen)A7 23Makani (Zamalek)G5 24 Mandarine Koueider G4 25 Nawab G2 26 Sekem G4 Drinking 27 Arabica G3 28 Cilantro E4 Cilantro (see 21) 29 Deals H5 Drinkies (see 31) 30 Garden Café H6 31 La Bodega H5 32 Sequoia G1 33 Simonds G5 34 Wel3a G5 Entertainment 35 Cairo Jazz Club D4 36El Sawy Culture WheelE4 37 National Circus E5 38 Nile Maxim H6 Shopping 39 Balady F4 40 Dina Maghawry G5 41 Diwan H5 42Fair Trade EgyptH5 43 Home & Beyond F4 44 Loft G5 45 Mix & Match H5 46 Mix & Match G6 47 Mobaco G4 48 Mom & Me F4 49 Mounaya Gallery G2 Nomad (see 5) 50 Nomad H7 51 Nostalgia H6 52 Orange Square F3 53 Sami Amin F4 54 Wady Craft Shop H6 Information 55British Council & LibraryE6 56Danish EmbassyG6 57Experience EgyptC5 58German EmbassyF7 59Irish EmbassyG4 60Istituto Italiano di CulturaG6 61Lebanese EmbassyF4 62Libyan EmbassyF5 63Lovely BazaarF3 64Netherlands EmbassyG5 65Netherlands-Flemish InstituteG6 66Spanish EmbassyG4 Cairo Marriott Luxury Hotel $$$ ( 2728 3000; www.marriott.com/caieg; 16 Sharia Saray al-Gezira; r from US$219; ) Historic atmosphere is thick in the the lobby and other public areas, which all occupy a 19th-century palace.


pages: 320 words: 86,372

Mythology of Work: How Capitalism Persists Despite Itself by Peter Fleming

1960s counterculture, anti-work, call centre, clockwatching, commoditize, corporate social responsibility, creative destruction, David Graeber, Etonian, future of work, G4S, Goldman Sachs: Vampire Squid, illegal immigration, Kitchen Debate, late capitalism, Mark Zuckerberg, market bubble, market fundamentalism, means of production, neoliberal agenda, Parkinson's law, post-industrial society, post-work, profit maximization, profit motive, quantitative easing, Results Only Work Environment, shareholder value, social intelligence, The Chicago School, transaction costs, wealth creators, working poor

For him, the uncertainty arises from the gaps and postponements caused by the fallible humans behind the surveillance – humans who are clearly confused and disorganized. Their organized disorganization is obviously designed to induce a certain type of anxiety in the prisoner, a Kafkaesque state of mind that continuously anticipates an arrival that never eventuates. However, the tagged prisoner is emotionally tortured, not as the land-surveyor K. was by a mystically inscrutable Castle, but by a private firm called Securicor (now G4S) which had successfully bid for the governmental contract: Day 2: As I enjoy a nice relaxing bath, the telephone rings. It’s the Securicor monitoring centre in Manchester, asking if I am at home. Either the bath water obscured the signal, or I was out of range. They say they will send someone round to investigate. Day 3: No one arrived yesterday to investigate my bath … Day 32: My partner’s grandfather died, and I am passed from pillar to post and back again between the prison, Securicor and probation to try to vary my curfew hours to attend the funeral.

capitalism ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4 General Motors plant (Michigan) ref1 Goffee, R. ref1 Goldman Sachs ref1 The Good Soldier Svejk (Hasek) ref1 Gordon, D. ref1 Gorz, A. ref1, ref2 Graeber, D. ref1 Groundhog Day (Ramis) ref1 Guattari, F. ref1, ref2, ref3 on criticism/criticality ref1 and de-subjectification ref1 language ref1, ref2 Gujarat NRE ref1 Gulf of Mexico oil spill (2010) ref1 Hamper, B. ref1 Hanlon, G. ref1 Hardt, M. ref1 Hart, A. ref1 Harvard Business Review (HBR) ref1 Harvey, D. ref1, ref2 Hayek, F. ref1, ref2, ref3 health and safety ref1, ref2 ‘Help to Buy’ support scheme ref1 Hirschhorn, N. ref1 Hodgkinson, T. ref1 holiday policy ref1 Houellebecq, Michel ref1, ref2, ref3 human capital ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6, ref7 human relations movement ref1 Human Resource Management (HRM) ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6 humour ref1 ‘I, Job’ function ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6 and biopower ref1, ref2 and death drive ref1, ref2 as escape into work ref1 and illness ref1, ref2, ref3 resisting ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6 see also escape; totality refusal see also work, as all-encompassing; working hours illegal immigrants, deportations ref1 illness ref1, ref2 collective ref1, ref2 see also Social Patients’ Collective as desirable experience ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4 of managers ref1, ref2 and productive power ref1, ref2 as weapon against capitalism ref1 ‘immersion room’ exercise ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4 imperceptibility ref1 see also invisibility incentivization ref1 indexation process ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5 informality and authoritarianism ref1, ref2 see also deformalization insecurity ref1 Institute of Leadership and Management (ILM) ref1, ref2, ref3 invisibility ref1, ref2 ‘Invisible Committee’ ref1, ref2 Italian autonomist thought ref1, ref2 Jameson, F. ref1 Jones, G. ref1 Junjie, Li ref1 Kamp, A. ref1 Kein Mensch ist illegal ref1 Kellaway, L. ref1 Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) ref1 Keynes, J.M. ref1, ref2 Khrushchev, Nikita ref1, ref2 Kim, Jonathan ref1 King, Stephen ref1 ‘Kitchen Debate’ ref1 Kramer, M. ref1, ref2 labour unions ref1 dissolution of ref1, ref2 language, evolution of ref1 Larkin, P. ref1 Latour, B. ref1, ref2 Laval, C. ref1, ref2 Lazzarato, M. ref1, ref2 leaders backgrounds ref1 remuneration and bonuses ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5 see also managers Lefebvre, H. ref1 Leidner, R. ref1 Lewin, D. ref1 liberation management ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5 life itself, enlisting ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5 lines of flight ref1, ref2 Lordon, F. ref1, ref2, ref3 Lucas, R. ref1, ref2 Lukács, G. ref1 Lynch, R. ref1 McChesney, R. ref1 McGregor, D. ref1 management ref1, ref2 and class function ref1, ref2 as co-ordination ref1 and inducement of willing obedience ref1, ref2 information deficit ref1 and power ref1, ref2 self-justification rituals ref1 as transferable skill ref1, ref2 managerialism ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6, ref7 and abandonment ideology ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5 and boundary management ref1 and conflict-seeking behaviour ref1 division between managers and managed ref1, ref2 general principles of ref1 and leadership ref1 profligate management function ref1 refusing ref1 and securitization ref1 as self-referential abstraction ref1 managers as abandonment enablers ref1, ref2 and deformalization ref1 and engagement of workers ref1, ref2 lack of practical experience ref1 overwork ref1, ref2 see also leaders Marcuse, H. ref1 Market Basket supermarket chain ref1 Marx, K. ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6 Maslow, A. ref1 Matten, D. ref1 meat consumption ref1 Meek, J. ref1 Meyerson, D. ref1 Michelli, J. ref1 Miller, W.I. ref1 Mitchell, David ref1 mobile technology ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6, ref7 Modafinil ref1, ref2 Monaghan, A. ref1 money ref1, ref2 see also accumulation Mooney, G. ref1 Moore, A.E. ref1 Moore, Michael ref1, ref2 music industry ref1 Naidoo, Kumi ref1 NASA ref1 Natali, Vincenzo ref1 Negri, A. ref1, ref2 neoliberal capitalism ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6, ref7 and bureaucracy ref1 and ideal worker ref1, ref2 and non-work time ref1, ref2 and paranoia ref1, ref2 resisting ref1, ref2 see also post-labour strategy and threat of abandonment ref1, ref2 and truth telling ref1, ref2, ref3 neoliberalism ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6 and class relations ref1, ref2, ref3 and disciplinary power ref1 and human-capital theory ref1 and impossibility ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6 and micro-fascism ref1 and reign of technocrats ref1 role of state ref1 and truth telling ref1, ref2 and worker engagement ref1, ref2, ref3 Nestlé ref1 New Public Management ref1, ref2 New Zealand, and capitalist deregulation ref1 New Zealand Oil and Gas (NZOG) ref1 Newman, Maurice ref1 Nietzsche, Friedrich ref1, ref2 Nixon, Richard ref1, ref2 Nyhan, B. ref1 obsession ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6, ref7, ref8 Onionhead program ref1 overcoding ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6, ref7 The Pain Journal (Flanagan) ref1, ref2, ref3 paranoia ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4 overwork/paranoia complex ref1, ref2 Paris Commune ref1, ref2 Parkinson’s Law ref1 Parnet, C. ref1 Parsons, T. ref1 Peep Show (TV comedy) ref1 pensions ref1, ref2 personnel management ref1 see also Human Resource Management Peters, T. ref1 Philip Morris ref1 Pike River Coal mine (New Zealand) ref1 Pollack, Sydney ref1 Pook, L. ref1 Porter, M. ref1, ref2 post-labour strategy, recommendations ref1 postmodernism ref1, ref2, ref3 power ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5 and truth telling ref1 Prasad, M. ref1 Price, S. ref1 private companies, transferring to public hands ref1 privatization ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6, ref7 profit maximization ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5 quantitative easing ref1 Rand, Ayn ref1 rationalization ref1, ref2, ref3 Reifler, J. ref1 reserve army of the unemployed ref1 Ressler, C. ref1 results-only work environment (ROWE) ref1, ref2, ref3 Rimbaud, A. ref1 Rio+20 Earth Summit (2012) ref1 ‘riot grrrl’ bands ref1 rituals of truth and reconciliation ref1 Roberts, J. ref1 Roger Award ref1 Roger and Me (Moore) ref1 Rosenblatt, R. ref1 Ross, A. ref1, ref2 Ross, K. ref1 Rudd, Kevin ref1 ruling class fear of work-free world ref1, ref2 and paranoia ref1, ref2 Sade, Marquis de ref1 Sallaz, J. ref1 Saurashtra Fuels ref1 Scarry, E. ref1 Securicor (G4S) ref1 Segarra, Carmen ref1 self-abnegation ref1 self-employment ref1 self-management ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5 self-preservation ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4 self-sufficiency ref1, ref2, ref3 shareholder capitalism ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4 shift work ref1, ref2 see also working hours Shragai, N. ref1 sleep and circadian rhythms ref1 as form of resistance ref1 working in ref1, ref2, ref3 smart drugs ref1, ref2 Smith, Roger ref1 smoking and addiction ref1 dangers of ref1, ref2 scientific research ref1 sociability ref1, ref2 ‘the social’ ref1, ref2 social factory ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6, ref7 and structure of work ref1 social media ref1 Social Mobility and Child Poverty Commission ref1 Social Patients’ Collective (SPK) ref1, ref2, ref3 social surplus (commons) ref1, ref2, ref3 socialism ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4 Sontag, S. ref1 Spicer, A. ref1 stakeholder management ref1, ref2 Starbucks ref1 state, theory of ref1 subcontracting ref1, ref2, ref3 subsidization ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6, ref7 suicide as act of refusal ref1 Freud’s definition ref1 work-related ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5 surplus labour ref1, ref2 surplus living wage ref1 ‘tagged’ employees ref1 ‘tagged’ prisoner ref1 Tally, Richard ref1 taxation ref1, ref2, ref3 Taylor, F.W. ref1 Taylor, S. ref1 Taylorism ref1 technological progress, and emancipation from labour ref1 Thatcher, Margaret ref1 Thatcherism ref1 They Shoot Horses Don’t They?


pages: 579 words: 160,351

Breaking News: The Remaking of Journalism and Why It Matters Now by Alan Rusbridger

accounting loophole / creative accounting, Airbnb, banking crisis, Bernie Sanders, Boris Johnson, centre right, Chelsea Manning, citizen journalism, cross-subsidies, crowdsourcing, David Attenborough, David Brooks, death of newspapers, Donald Trump, Doomsday Book, Double Irish / Dutch Sandwich, Downton Abbey, Edward Snowden, Etonian, Filter Bubble, forensic accounting, Frank Gehry, future of journalism, G4S, high net worth, invention of movable type, invention of the printing press, Jeff Bezos, jimmy wales, Julian Assange, Mark Zuckerberg, Menlo Park, natural language processing, New Journalism, offshore financial centre, oil shale / tar sands, open borders, packet switching, Panopticon Jeremy Bentham, pre–internet, ransomware, recommendation engine, Ruby on Rails, sexual politics, Silicon Valley, Skype, Snapchat, social web, Socratic dialogue, sovereign wealth fund, speech recognition, Steve Jobs, The Wisdom of Crowds, Tim Cook: Apple, traveling salesman, upwardly mobile, WikiLeaks

Lewis again used Twitter the following year to investigate the death of an Angolan refugee, Jimmy Mubenga, on a British Airways flight on which he was being forcibly deported. The traditional instinct of reporters was not to let anyone else know in advance you’re on a particular story. Lewis inverted that – and was rewarded by passengers on the plane who gave him eyewitness accounts of how Mubenga had been suffocated by security guards working for G4S.6 Lewis – along with his colleague Matthew Taylor – was again at the heart of the Guardian’s coverage of the riots that broke out in England in the summer of 2011. It was a week of chaos, flames, protests, looting and disorder in towns and cities across England. By the end of the week, five people had died and more than 1,500 had been arrested. It was a very difficult story for any conventional news desk to keep track of – fast moving, anarchic, scattered.

A reasoned case for the power of ‘open information’ had been advanced in 2004 by the author James Surowiecki in his book The Wisdom of Crowds; see Bibliography. 5. An inquest found he had been unlawfully killed. The policeman who struck him was found not guilty after the jury deliberated for four days. He was dismissed from the police for ‘gross misconduct’ towards Tomlinson, and for using ‘excessive and unlawful force’. 6. Three G4S security guards were cleared of his manslaughter in 2014. Deportation escorts were subsequently trained in safer restraint methods. 7. The Guardian teamed up with the London School of Economics to examine the causes and effects of the riots, in an empirical study supported by the Open Society and the Joseph Rowntree Foundation. 8. ‘Rocket Man’, New Yorker, 25 November 2013; Patrick Radden Keefe 9.

Joseph ref1 Canary Wharf ref1, ref2, ref3 Canonbury ref1 Carlson, Tucker ref1 Carman, George (QC) ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4n Carney, Mark ref1 Carter, Graydon ref1 Carter-Ruck lawyers ref1 Carvin, Andy ref1 Catch Me If You Can (film) ref1 Caulfield, Mr Justice ref1 Cecil, Lord Robert ref1 censorship ref1, ref2, ref3 CERN ref1 challenge ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4 Champaign News Gazette (newspaper) ref1, ref2 Channel 4 (TV) ref1, ref2 Chaos Monkeys (Martínez) ref1, ref2 Chapman, Jessica ref1 charity ref1 Charles, Prince ref1 Chartbeat ref1 Chehadé, Fadi ref1 Chernin, Peter ref1 Chicago Online ref1 Chicago Sun-Times (news-paper) ref1 Chicago Tribune (newspaper) ref1, ref2 China ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4 Chippendale, Peter ref1 Chomsky, Noam ref1, ref2 Churchill, Prime Minister Sir Winston ref1, ref2, ref3 ‘churnalism’ ref1, ref2 CIA ref1 CiF (Comment is Free) ref1, ref2 CiF Belief ref1, ref2n circulation ref1, ref2, ref3 passim, ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4n bulk sales ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6, ref7n, ref8n decline ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5 gains ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4 international ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5 citizen journalists (stringers) ref1, ref2 Citizen Kane (film) ref1 City of London ref1 City University of New York (CUNY) ref1 Clapper, James ref1, ref2 Claridge’s hotel ref1, ref2 classified material ref1, ref2, ref3 Clegg, Nick (MP) ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4 Clerkenwell ref1 ‘click-through rate’ (CTR) ref1 clickbait ref1, ref2 climate change ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6, ref7, ref8, ref9, ref10n Clinton, President Bill ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4 Clinton, Hillary ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5 Clooney, George ref1 Cobain, Ian ref1 Cobbet, William ref1 Code of Practice ref1 Coile, Peter ref1 Colao, Vittori ref1 colour ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6n Colvin, Marie ref1 Comey, James ref1 Committee of Imperial Defence (UK) ref1 Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ) ref1, ref2n ‘commodity news’ ref1 Common Purpose ref1 complexity ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4 composing room ref1, ref2 ComScore ref1, ref2n concentration camps ref1 Conn, David ref1 consent ref1 Conservative Party ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6, ref7, ref8, ref9, ref10, ref11, ref12, ref13 content management system ref1, ref2 convergence ref1 Coogan, Steve ref1 Cook, Tim ref1 Corn, David ref1 correction ref1, ref2 corruption ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6, ref7 Coulson, Andy ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4 Cox, Jo (MP) ref1 Craigslist ref1, ref2 The Creation of the Media (Starr) ref1 cricket ref1 Crossman, Richard ref1 crowdfunding ref1 crowdsourcing ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6 Crown Prosecution Service ref1, ref2 Crowther, Geoffrey ref1 Culture Media & Sports committee (UK) ref1 CUNY ref1 CVs ref1, ref2 cybercrime ref1 cyberspace ref1 Dacre, Paul ref1, ref2, ref3n, ref4n Dagens Nyheter (newspaper) ref1, ref2 Daily Dish ref1 Daily (iPad newspaper) ref1 Daily Mail & General Trust ref1 Daily News (newspaper) ref1 Daily Sketch (newspaper) ref1 Dangerous Estate (Williams) ref1 Danks, Melanie ref1, ref2 Danny (IT expert) ref1 data ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5 Davies, Nick ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6 passim, ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4n, ref5n Davis, David (MP) ref1, ref2 Dayton Ohio peace accord ref1 De Correspondent ref1, ref2 de Tocqueville, Alexis ref1 ‘dead-tree journalism’ ref1, ref2 Deadline (film) ref1 deadlines ref1 Dean, Malcolm ref1n ‘death knock’ ref1 Deedes, Lord Bill ref1, ref2 Deedes, Jeremy ref1 Deepwater Horizon ref1 defamation ref1, ref2 Defence Advisory (DA) Notice system ref1, ref2, ref3 deference ref1 Defoe, Daniel ref1, ref2 Delane, John ref1, ref2 Delaunay hotel ref1, ref2 Delingpole, James ref1, ref2 Deller, Jeremy ref1 democracy ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6, ref7, ref8, ref9, ref10, ref11, ref12, ref13 Democratic National Committee (DNC) ref1, ref2 Department of Justice (US) ref1 Der Spiegel (magazine) ref1, ref2, ref3 Desmond, Richard ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6, ref7, ref8n Despicable Me (film) ref1 Dewey, John ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4n Diamond, Bob ref1 Diana, Princess ref1 Diawara, Fatoumata ref1 Dickens, Charles ref1, ref2 Die Zeit (newspaper) ref1 Digg ref1 ‘Digital News Report’ (RISJ) ref1 Dixon, Hugo ref1 Dixon, Jeremy ref1, ref2n docu-tainment ref1, ref2 donations ref1, ref2 doorstep reporting ref1, ref2, ref3 Dorsey, Jack ref1 dot.com bubble ref1 Dowler, Milly ref1, ref2n Downie, Len ref1n Downing Street ref1, ref2 drinks culture ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6, ref7, ref8, ref9, ref10 Drudge ref1 drugs ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4 duty ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6 DVDs ref1 Dworkin, Ronald ref1, ref2 eBay ref1, ref2, ref3 Economist (magazine) ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6, ref7, ref8 Edelman Trust Barometer ref1n Edison, Thomas ref1 editorials ref1, ref2, ref3 Edmondson, Ian ref1 education ref1, ref2 Eisenstein, Elizabeth L. ref1 El País (newspaper) ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4 election (US 2016) ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4 Electoral Commission ref1 electric cars ref1 Electronic Information Service ref1 The Elements of Journalism (Kovach/Rosenstiel) ref1 Elizabeth II, Queen ref1 Ellingham Hall (Suffolk) ref1 Ellis, Michael (MP) ref1 Ellison, Sarah ref1 Ellsberg, Daniel ref1 Emap ref1 eMarketer ref1 Enders Analysis ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4 endowment ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6, ref7n Engelberg, Steve ref1 The Enlightenment ref1, ref2 Enron ref1 environment ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5 Enzensberger, Hans-Magnus ref1 Ernst & Young ref1 Espionage Act (1917) ref1 EternalBlue ref1n Euromyth ref1 Europe ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5 European Commission (EC) ref1 European Convention on Human Rights ref1, ref2 European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) ref1 European Court of Justice (ECJ) ref1, ref2, ref3 European (newspaper) ref1, ref2 European Union (EU) ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5 Euston Project ref1 Evans, Sir Harold ref1, ref2, ref3 Evans, Rob ref1, ref2 Evans, Timothy ref1, ref2n experimentation ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5 Facebook ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4 passim, ref1, ref2, ref3 passim, ref1, ref2 passim, ref1 passim, ref1 facts ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6, ref7, ref8, ref9, ref10, ref11, ref12, ref13, ref14 Fahrenthold, David ref1 Fairfax Media ref1, ref2, ref3 fake news see under falsehood Falconer, Lord ref1 Falkirk Herald (newspaper) ref1, ref2 falsehood ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6, ref7, ref8, ref9, ref10, ref11 fake news ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6, ref7, ref8, ref9, ref10, ref11, ref12 passim lies ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6, ref7, ref8 Farage, Nigel ref1, ref2 Farrar, Jeremy ref1 Farringdon Road ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6, ref7, ref8, ref9, ref10 FBI ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4 FedEx conditions of carriage ref1 Fedorcio, Dick ref1 Feinstein, Senator Diane ref1 female genital mutilation ref1, ref2 Ferguson, Niall ref1 Ferrer, Albert ref1 Fidler, Roger ref1 The Fifth Estate (film) ref1, ref2n Filloux, Frederic ref1 filter bubbles ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6 First Amendment (US) ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4n Fish4jobs ref1 Fitzsimons, Sheila ref1n, ref2n Flat Earth News (Davies) ref1 Fleet Street ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5 Flickr ref1, ref2, ref3 Folwell, Steve ref1 food production ref1, ref2 Forbes (magazine) ref1 Ford, John ref1, ref2 foreign correspondents ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6 Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (US 1977) ref1 Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) courts ref1 Foreign Office ref1 Forgan, Liz ref1, ref2 fossil fuels ref1 Fourth Estate ref1 Fox TV ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6, ref6 Frankel, Max ref1 Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung (newspaper) ref1 free newspapers ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6, ref7, ref8 free press ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6, ref7, ref8, ref9 free speech ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6, ref7, ref8, ref9 freebies ref1, ref2, ref3 Freedland, Jonathan ref1, ref2 Freedom Act (2015) ref1 Friedman, Thomas ref1 Friendly, Fred ref1 G4S security guards ref1, ref2n G-20 protests (2009) ref1 Gaddafi, Muammar ref1 GAFAT companies ref1, ref2 Gallagher, Tony ref1 Gaskell, John ref1 Gates, Bill ref1 GCHQ ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6, ref7, ref8n Geary, Joanna ref1 Gehry, Frank ref1 Gellman, Barton ref1 Gentleman, Amelia ref1 George III, King ref1 germ (virus) ref1 Germany ref1, ref2 Gibson, Janine ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6, ref7 Gillespie, Fulton ref1 Gillmor, Dan ref1, ref2, ref3n Glaxo Smith Kline (GSK) ref1 Gledhill, Ruth ref1 Glocer, Tom ref1 Glover, Stephen ref1, ref2, ref3n, ref4n Goldacre, Ben ref1, ref2n Goldman, William ref1, ref2 Goldman Sachs ref1, ref2 Good, Jennifer ref1 Goodale, James ref1 Goodman, Clive ref1, ref2 Goodman, Elinor ref1 Google ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6, ref7, ref8, ref9, ref10, ref11, ref12 passim, ref1, ref2 Goranzon, Anders ref1 Gordon, David ref1, ref2, ref3n Gordon, Michael ref1 Gore, Vice President Al ref1 Gorwa, Robert ref1 Gove, Michael ref1 Gowers, Andrew ref1 Graham, Don ref1, ref2 Graham, James ref1 Graham, Katherine (Kay) ref1, ref2, ref3 Granada TV ref1, ref2 Grant, Hugh ref1 Gray, Charles (QC) ref1, ref2, ref3n Great Barrier Reef ref1 Great Integration ref1 Greenslade, Roy ref1, ref2, ref3n Greenwald, Glenn ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6, ref7, ref8 Greer, Ian ref1 Guardian Australia ref1 Guardian Cities ref1 Guardian Media Group (GMG) ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6, ref7, ref8, ref9, ref10, ref11n, ref12n Board ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6, ref7, ref8n, ref9n Guardian News and Media (GNM) ref1, ref2n Guardian Unlimited ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6, ref7, ref8, ref9, ref10n Gulliver, Stuart ref1, ref2 gun control ref1 Gurfein, Judge Murray ref1 GUS retail group ref1 Gutenberg, Johannes ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4 Haaretz (newspaper) ref1 Hack Attack (Davies) ref1, ref2 Hacked Off ref1 Hagel, John ref1 Haig, General Al ref1, ref2 Hamilton, Neil (MP) ref1, ref2, ref3n Hankey, Sir Maurice ref1 Hanks, Tom ref1 Hansard ref1, ref2 hard knocks, school of ref1, ref2 Harding, James ref1 Harford, Tim ref1 Harlow Technical College ref1 Harris, Wendy ref1 Hartwell, Lord ref1 Hastings, Max ref1, ref2, ref3n Hayden, Michael V. ref1 Hayden, Teresa Nielsen ref1 Hayley, Sir William ref1 Hazlitt, William ref1, ref2 Hearst, William Randolph ref1, ref2 Henry, Georgina ref1, ref2 Henry Jackson Society ref1 Herald Sun (newspaper) ref1 Here Comes Everybody (Shirky) ref1 Hetherington, Alistair ref1, ref2 Hewlett, Steve ref1 Heywood, Jeremy ref1, ref2 Higgins, Eliot ref1 High Court ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4 Hillsborough disaster (1989) ref1, ref2, ref3n Hinton, Les ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4 Hirsch, Fred ref1, ref2, ref3n Hislop, Ian ref1 HMRC ref1 Hoare, Sean ref1, ref2 Hodgson, Godfrey ref1 Hoffman, Dustin ref1, ref2 Hoffman, Reid ref1, ref2 Holder, Eric ref1 Hollywood ref1 Home Affairs committee (UK) ref1 Home Office ref1 The Home Organist (magazine) ref1 Hong Kong ref1 Hooper, David ref1 Hopkins, Nick ref1 Horowitz, Ami ref1 Horrie, Chris ref1 Hotel Bristol (Villars) ref1, ref2 HotWired ref1 House of Commons ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4 House of Lords ref1, ref2 Houston, Robin ref1 How to Spend It (magazine) ref1 HSBC ref1, ref2, ref3 Huffington, Arianna ref1, ref2n Huffington, Michael ref1 Huffington Post ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5n Human Genome Project ref1 Human Rights Act (1998) ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4n Humanity United ref1 Hunt, Henry ref1 Hutton report (2004) ref1 ‘idea agora’ ref1 i-escape ref1 Iliffe of Yattendon, Lord ref1 Imanuelsen, Peter ref1 immigration ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6n Independent Press Standards Organisation (IPSO) ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4 Independent on Sunday (newspaper) ref1 Indonesia ref1 InFacts ref1 ‘influence model’ ref1 Infomediary ref1 information chaos ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6 Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) ref1 ‘information superhighway’ ref1, ref2, ref3 Ingrams, Richard ref1 injunctions ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5 Ink (Graham) ref1 Inkster, Nigel ref1 ‘innovation blindness’ ref1 Instagram ref1 integrated model ref1 integrity ref1 Intelligence Community programmes (US) ref1 ‘intelligence porn’ ref1 Intelligence and Security committee (UK) ref1, ref2 Intercept ref1 The Internet for Dummies (series) ref1 Internet Explorer ref1 intrusion ref1 investigative journalism ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6, ref7, ref8, ref9, ref10n Investigatory Powers Act (2016) (UK) ref1 Investigatory Powers Tribunal (IPT) (UK) ref1, ref2 ‘invisible mending’ ref1 iPad ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4 iPhone ref1, ref2 iPlayer ref1 IRA ref1, ref2 Iran ref1, ref2 Iraq wars ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6, ref7, ref8 Ireland ref1 Irish Independent (newspaper) ref1, ref2 Irish Times (newspaper) ref1 Irons, Jeremy ref1 Isaacson, Walter ref1 iTunes ref1 ITV ref1, ref2 James, Clive ref1 James, Erwin ref1 Jarvis, Jeff ref1, ref2, ref3 Jay, Peter ref1 Jenkins, Simon ref1, ref2 Jersey ref1 Jobs, Steve ref1 Johnson, Boris (MP) ref1, ref2 Johnson, Graham ref1 Johnston Press Ltd ref1n Jonathan of Arabia (TV) ref1 Jones, George ref1 Joseph Rowntree Foundation ref1 journalism accountability ref1, ref2 dead-tree ref1, ref2 investigative ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6, ref7, ref8, ref9, ref10n seven deadly sins ref1n traditional ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5 training ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4 Jowell, Tessa ref1 Judicial Redress Act (2016) ref1 Junius ref1 ‘junk news’ ref1 Jupiter Research ref1 Kaplan Educational publishing ref1 Katine (Uganda) ref1 Katz, Ian ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6n Kaufer, Stephen ref1 Keller, Bill ref1, ref2, ref3 Kelner, Simon ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5n Kenya ref1, ref2 ‘keyword pages’ ref1 Khatchadourian, Raffi ref1 King, Dave ref1, ref2 King’s College, London ref1 Kings Place offices ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5 Kinsley, Michael ref1 Kirwan, Peter ref1 Knight Ridder ref1, ref2 Knopfler, Mark ref1 Kovach, Bill ref1 Krauze, Andre ref1 Kushner, Jared ref1 La Repubblica (newspaper) ref1 Laborde, Jean-Paul ref1 Labour Party ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6, ref7 Lamb, Larry ref1 Lambert, Richard ref1 Lanchester, John ref1, ref2 Large Hadron Collider ref1 Larson, Jeff ref1 Law Commission (UK) ref1 Lawrence, Felicity ref1 Lawson, Dominic ref1 lawyers ref1n Le Monde (newspaper) ref1, ref2 Leave campaign group ref1 Lebedev, Alexander ref1, ref2n Lebedev, Evgeny ref1n legacy media ref1 legality ref1 Lehman Brothers ref1, ref2 Leigh, David ref1, ref2 Leipzig, mayor of ref1 Lelyveld, Joseph ref1 Leonard, Joe ref1 letters ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5 newsletters ref1, ref2, ref3 readers’ ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6, ref7, ref8, ref9 Leveson, Lord Justice Brian ref1, ref2, ref3n Leveson Inquiry ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6, ref7, ref8n Levin, Bernard ref1, ref2n Lewinsky, Monica ref1 Lewis, Paul ref1, ref2, ref3 Lewis, Will ref1 libel actions ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6, ref7n, ref8n, ref9n libel laws ref1, ref2 Liberal Democrat party ref1, ref2 Liberty ref1 Liberty and Security in a Changing World (2013 report) ref1 lies see under falsehood lighthouse model ref1, ref2 LinkedIn ref1, ref2, ref3 links ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6, ref7, ref8, ref9, ref10n Linotype machine ref1, ref2, ref3 Linux ref1 Lippmann, Walter ref1 Littlewoods ref1 Lloyd, John ref1 Lloyds Bank ref1 Local Government Act (1972) ref1 Local World Ltd ref1, ref2, ref3n London Daily News (newspaper) ref1 London Evening Standard (newspaper) ref1 London Review of Books ref1, ref2 London School of Economics ref1n Lonely Planet ref1 ‘long tail’, theory of ref1 Los Angeles Times (newspaper) ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4 Lowry, L.S. ref1, ref2n loyalty scheme ref1 Ludgate Circus ref1 Ludlow machine ref1, ref2 Luxx (magazine) ref1 Luyendijk, Joris ref1 MacAskill, Ewen ref1, ref2, ref3 McCabe, Douglas ref1 McCabe, Eamonn ref1 McCain, John ref1 McCall, Carolyn ref1, ref2, ref3 Macedonia ref1 MacKenzie, Kelvin ref1 McKibben, Bill ref1, ref2 McKillen, Paddy ref1 McKinsey & Co ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4 MacLennan, Murdoch ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6n Macron, President Emmanuel ref1 MacroWikinomics (Tapscott) ref1 MacTaggart lecture (2009) ref1 Mail Online ref1, ref2, ref3 Mainstream Media (MSM) ref1, ref2, ref3 Major, Prime Minister John ref1 The Making of the English Working Class (Thompson) ref1 Malmo ref1 Manchester Evening News (MEN) (newspaper) ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4n Manchester Guardian (newspaper) ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4 Mandelson, Peter (MP) ref1 Manning, Chelsea ref1, ref2, ref3 Marks, Vic ref1 Marland, Caroline ref1 ‘marmalade dropper’ ref1, ref2n Martínez, Antonio García ref1, ref2 Mashable ref1, ref2 ‘The Masque of Anarchy’ (poem) ref1 Massachusetts Institute of Technology ref1 Match.com ref1 Mauro, Ezio ref1 Maxwell, Robert ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6n May Corporation Ltd ref1 May, Prime Minister Theresa ref1, ref2, ref3 Mayes, Ian ref1, ref2 Mead/Lexis ref1 Medejski, John ref1 Media Guardian ref1 media law ref1 media section ref1 Media Show (radio) ref1 Media Standards Trust (MST) ref1 Meeker, Mary ref1 Melbourne, Florida ref1, ref2 Merkel, Chancellor Angela ref1 Metcalfe, Jane ref1 metrics ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6, ref7, ref8 Metro (newspaper) ref1, ref2, ref3n Meyer, Philip ref1, ref2 MI5 ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6n MI6 ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6, ref7, ref8n Miami Herald (newspaper) ref1 Michelin tyres ref1 Microsoft ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4 Middle East ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6, ref7 ‘middle market’ ref1 Middleton, Julia ref1 migrant workers ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4 Miliband, Ed (MP) ref1 Miliband, Ralph ref1, ref2 Mill, John Stuart ref1 Miller, Andrew ref1n, ref2n Miller, Sienna ref1 Milton, John ref1, ref2, ref3 Miranda, David ref1, ref2 Mirror Group Newspapers ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5 mobile devices ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6, ref7 moderation ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5 Monaco ref1 Monbiot, George ref1 monitoring ref1 Monsanto ref1 Moore, Charles ref1, ref2, ref3 Moore, Michael ref1 Moran, Chris ref1 Morgan, Daniel ref1 Morgan, Piers ref1 Morgan Stanley ref1 morning conference ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6n Morozov, Evgeny ref1 Moses, Sir Alan ref1 Mossberg, Walt ref1 Mother Jones (magazine) ref1 Movable Type ref1 Mowatt, Roger ref1 Mowlam, Mo (MP) ref1, ref2n MPs ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6, ref7, ref8, ref9 MSN ref1 Mubenga, Jimmy ref1, ref2 Mugabe, President Robert ref1 Mulcaire, Glenn ref1, ref2, ref3 Mumsnet ref1 Murdoch, James ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5 Murdoch, Rupert ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6, ref7, ref8, ref9, ref10, ref11 passim, ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6n Murdoch, Wendi ref1 Murdoch empire ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6, ref7, ref8, ref9, ref10, ref11, ref12, ref13, ref14, ref15, ref16n Murray, Douglas ref1 Murray, Scott ref1, ref2 Murrow, Edward R. ref1 Muslims ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4 Mutter, Alan ref1 mutualisation ref1, ref2, ref3 Myners, Paul ref1, ref2 MySpace ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4 National Security Agency (NSA) ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6, ref7, ref8, ref9, ref10 National Theatre ref1 National Union of Journalists ref1, ref2 Naughton, John ref1 NCND policy (never confirm nor deny) ref1 Negroponte, Nicholas ref1 Netherlands, Queen of the ref1 netiquette ref1 Netscape ref1, ref2 Neuberger, Lord ref1 Nevin, Charles ref1 New Republic (magazine) ref1 New Statesman (magazine) ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5 New York Observer (newspaper) ref1 New York offices ref1, ref2, ref3 New York Post (newspaper) ref1 New York Times v.


pages: 299 words: 91,839

What Would Google Do? by Jeff Jarvis

23andMe, Amazon Mechanical Turk, Amazon Web Services, Anne Wojcicki, barriers to entry, Berlin Wall, business process, call centre, cashless society, citizen journalism, clean water, commoditize, connected car, credit crunch, crowdsourcing, death of newspapers, different worldview, disintermediation, diversified portfolio, don't be evil, fear of failure, Firefox, future of journalism, G4S, Google Earth, Googley, Howard Rheingold, informal economy, inventory management, Jeff Bezos, jimmy wales, Kevin Kelly, Mark Zuckerberg, moral hazard, Network effects, new economy, Nicholas Carr, old-boy network, PageRank, peer-to-peer lending, post scarcity, prediction markets, pre–internet, Ronald Coase, search inside the book, Silicon Valley, Skype, social graph, social software, social web, spectrum auction, speech recognition, Steve Jobs, the medium is the message, The Nature of the Firm, the payments system, The Wisdom of Crowds, transaction costs, web of trust, WikiLeaks, Y Combinator, Zipcar

It’s still about relationships. The internet just makes it easier to break rules and break in. Anybody who’s any good can aspire to be a monarch of any or many media. They may not be as big as Stern, Jon Stewart, or Steven Spielberg. But in a post-blockbuster, small-is-the-new-big economy, they don’t have to be. Now fast-forward to 2005, when geek-show host Kevin Rose left TechTV after his network merged with G4, a game channel. Instead of getting another job at another network, Rose started his own networks, because he could. First he created Digg, a collaborative news service where users suggest stories and then vote on them to create the community’s front page. It attracts more than 25 million users a month. The service was revolutionary, giving the public—rather than editors—the power to make news judgments.

., 66 Facebook, 4, 20–21, 48, 126 automobile industry and, 173–74 Causes application, 196–97 Google and, 101 government and, 220–21 mistakes and, 94–95 as platform, 34–35 politics and, 51 trust and, 85–86 Fake, Caterina, 45, 89 FARC (Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia), 220 fashion, 103–4, 180 Fast Company, 15 Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 131, 166, 219 Federated, 55 financial meltdown of 2008, 69 First Amendment, 237 Flickr, 21, 45 communities and, 50 customer input and, 89–90 Flixwagon.com, 105 FoodBlogBlog, 155 forgiveness, 232 fragmentation, 63, 65 fraud, 205–6 Freakonomics (Levitt & Dubner), 75 free book publishing and, 141 as business model, 76–80 Freedom of Information Act, 218 Fresh Direct, 179 Friedman, Jane, 141–42 Friedman, Thomas, 165 friendships, 231–32 G4, 132 Galant, Debra, 127 Garfield, Bob, 150–51, 167–68 Gawker Media, 55, 92 Generation Google, 7, 231 GetSatisfaction.com, 47 gift economy, 59–63 Glam, 29–30 Gmail, 6, 78–79, 168–69 Godin, Seth, 57, 204–5 Gonzo Marketing (Locke), 149–50 Google ambitions of, 121 antitrust inquiry of, 100 customer service and, 170 economy, 68–69 embedding, 6 Facebook and, 101 fooling, 43 growth of, 69 home page, 115 Justice Department investigation of, 6 links and, 27 media revenue plan, 143–44 platforms of, 33 success of, 5–6 Google Analytics, 33 Google Apps, 168 Google Calendar, 33, 168 Google Checkout, 198 Google Docs, 33, 168 Google Groups, 33 Google Health, 200–201 Googlejuice, 42–45 New York Times and, 78 Vaynerchuk and, 158 Google Maps, 33–34, 168 embedding, 6 real estate and, 188 Google News, 39, 94, 126 Google.org, 162–65 Gore, Al, 163, 217 government, 217–21 Gross, Bill, 175, 193–94 growth, 31–32 Haass, Richard, 237 hacking, 201–2 Haque, Umair, 64, 74, 101–2, 237 Hatt, Bertil, 204 health care, 199–203, 208 Heiferman, Scott, 206–7 Here Comes Everybody (Shirky), 50, 60, 151, 237 Heyward, Andrew, 37 Holovaty, Adrian, 34 Holtzbrinck, 193 home pages, 115 honesty, 95–97 Hot, Flat, and Crowded (Friedman, T.), 165 Hourihan, Meg, 25 Huack, Peter, 37 Huffington, Ariana, 124 Hughes, Chris, 51 Hulu, 135 Hunter, Dick, 18–19 Icerocket, 15, 20 ICQ, 31–32 Idealab, 175, 193 Ideas platform, 62 IdeaStorm, 17 identity, 233–34 business, 80–81 Ikea, 140 incubators, 193 Indeed.com, 39 inefficiency, 74, 128–29 InnoCentive, 113–14 innovation, 111–14 cash flow v., 110 newspapers and, 129–30 Institute for the Future of the Book, 138 insurance, 203–9 interestingness, 89–90 iPhone, 51 “Is Google Making Us Stupid?”


pages: 339 words: 88,732

The Second Machine Age: Work, Progress, and Prosperity in a Time of Brilliant Technologies by Erik Brynjolfsson, Andrew McAfee

"Robert Solow", 2013 Report for America's Infrastructure - American Society of Civil Engineers - 19 March 2013, 3D printing, access to a mobile phone, additive manufacturing, Airbnb, Albert Einstein, Amazon Mechanical Turk, Amazon Web Services, American Society of Civil Engineers: Report Card, Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic, autonomous vehicles, barriers to entry, basic income, Baxter: Rethink Robotics, British Empire, business cycle, business intelligence, business process, call centre, Charles Lindbergh, Chuck Templeton: OpenTable:, clean water, combinatorial explosion, computer age, computer vision, congestion charging, corporate governance, creative destruction, crowdsourcing, David Ricardo: comparative advantage, digital map, employer provided health coverage, en.wikipedia.org, Erik Brynjolfsson, factory automation, falling living standards, Filter Bubble, first square of the chessboard / second half of the chessboard, Frank Levy and Richard Murnane: The New Division of Labor, Freestyle chess, full employment, G4S, game design, global village, happiness index / gross national happiness, illegal immigration, immigration reform, income inequality, income per capita, indoor plumbing, industrial robot, informal economy, intangible asset, inventory management, James Watt: steam engine, Jeff Bezos, jimmy wales, job automation, John Markoff, John Maynard Keynes: Economic Possibilities for our Grandchildren, John Maynard Keynes: technological unemployment, Joseph Schumpeter, Kevin Kelly, Khan Academy, knowledge worker, Kodak vs Instagram, law of one price, low skilled workers, Lyft, Mahatma Gandhi, manufacturing employment, Marc Andreessen, Mark Zuckerberg, Mars Rover, mass immigration, means of production, Narrative Science, Nate Silver, natural language processing, Network effects, new economy, New Urbanism, Nicholas Carr, Occupy movement, oil shale / tar sands, oil shock, pattern recognition, Paul Samuelson, payday loans, post-work, price stability, Productivity paradox, profit maximization, Ralph Nader, Ray Kurzweil, recommendation engine, Report Card for America’s Infrastructure, Robert Gordon, Rodney Brooks, Ronald Reagan, Second Machine Age, self-driving car, sharing economy, Silicon Valley, Simon Kuznets, six sigma, Skype, software patent, sovereign wealth fund, speech recognition, statistical model, Steve Jobs, Steven Pinker, Stuxnet, supply-chain management, TaskRabbit, technological singularity, telepresence, The Bell Curve by Richard Herrnstein and Charles Murray, The Signal and the Noise by Nate Silver, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, total factor productivity, transaction costs, Tyler Cowen: Great Stagnation, Vernor Vinge, Watson beat the top human players on Jeopardy!, winner-take-all economy, Y2K

IBM’s Watson draws on a plethora of clever algorithms, but it would be uncompetitive without computer hardware that is about one hundred times more powerful than Deep Blue, its chess-playing predecessor that beat the human world champion, Garry Kasparov, in a 1997 match. Speech recognition applications like Siri require lots of computing power, which became available on mobile phones like Apple’s iPhone 4S (the first phone that came with Siri installed). The iPhone 4S was about as powerful, in fact, as Apple’s top-of-the-line Powerbook G4 laptop had been a decade earlier. As all of these innovations show, exponential progress allows technology to keep racing ahead and makes science fiction reality in the second half of the chessboard. Not Just for Computers Anymore: The Spread of Moore’s Law Another comparison across computer generations highlights not only the power of Moore’s Law but also its wide reach. As is the case with the ASCI Red and the PlayStation 3, the Cray-2 supercomputer (introduced in 1985) and iPad 2 tablet (introduced in 2011) had almost identical peak calculation speeds.

Jay OpenTable OrCam O’Reilly, Tim Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Orteig Prize Orwell, George Oswald, Andrew Page, Larry Paine, Thomas Pandora Partnership for a New American Economy Pascarella, Ernest pattern recognition Pauling, Linus peer economy Perrow, Charles Perry, Mark philosophy, transformative phones, mobile: in developing world see also smartphones photography photo sharing Picasso, Pablo Pigou, Arthur Pigovian taxes Pink, Daniel Pinker, Steven Pinterest Pivot Power Plutarch Polanyi, Michael pollution polymerase chain reaction (PCR) Popular Science Porter, Michael Powerbook G4 Power Law distributions Principles of Economics (Mankiw) printing, 3D privacy, in digital vs. analog world productivity: decoupling of employment from decoupling of wages from effect of spread on in electricity era growth of innovation linked to intangible goods’ effect on mid-1990s U.S. increase in new paths to post-1970 U.S. decline in post-2000 U.S. growth in see also economic growth; gross domestic product (GDP); labor productivity, capital productivity, multifactor productivity, total factor publishing, digitization and Putnam, Robert Quirky R Race Against the Machine (Brynjolfsson and McAfee) Rajan, Raghuram Rampell, Catherine Raymond, Eric reading AI capabilities in Reagan, Ronald regulation: of business of peer economy religion rents, economic resource curse Rethink Robotics retinal implants Rhapsody Ricardo, David Rigobon, Roberto Robinson, James Robotics, Three Laws of robots: business use of; see also automation rapid progress in sensory equipment for skills acquisition by; see also Moravec’s paradox towel-folding see also artificial intelligence (AI) Rockoff, Jonah Roksa, Josipa Romer, Paul Roomba Roosevelt, Franklin D.


pages: 382 words: 92,138

The Entrepreneurial State: Debunking Public vs. Private Sector Myths by Mariana Mazzucato

"Robert Solow", Apple II, banking crisis, barriers to entry, Bretton Woods, business cycle, California gold rush, call centre, carbon footprint, Carmen Reinhart, cleantech, computer age, creative destruction, credit crunch, David Ricardo: comparative advantage, demand response, deskilling, endogenous growth, energy security, energy transition, eurozone crisis, everywhere but in the productivity statistics, Financial Instability Hypothesis, full employment, G4S, Growth in a Time of Debt, Hyman Minsky, incomplete markets, information retrieval, intangible asset, invisible hand, Joseph Schumpeter, Kenneth Rogoff, Kickstarter, knowledge economy, knowledge worker, natural language processing, new economy, offshore financial centre, Philip Mirowski, popular electronics, profit maximization, Ralph Nader, renewable energy credits, rent-seeking, ride hailing / ride sharing, risk tolerance, shareholder value, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley ideology, smart grid, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Tim Cook: Apple, too big to fail, total factor productivity, trickle-down economics, Washington Consensus, William Shockley: the traitorous eight

The increasing percentage of public services, across the globe, that are being ‘outsourced’ to the private sector, is usually done using precisely this ‘efficiency’ argument. Yet a proper look at the real cost savings that such outsourcing provides – especially taking into account the lack of ‘quality control’ and absurd costs that ensue – is almost never carried out. The recent scandal where the security for London’s 2012 Olympics was outsourced to a company called G4S, which then failed due to utter incompetence to deliver, meant that the British Army was called in to provide security during the Olympics. While the managers of the company were ‘reprimanded’ the company today is still making profits and outsourcing remains on the rise. Examples where outsourcing is resisted, such as the BBC’s choice to build the Internet platform for its broadcasting, the iPlayer, in-house has meant that it has been able to keep the BBC a dynamic innovative organization, that continues to attract top talent, retaining its high market share in both radio and TV – what public broadcasters in other countries can only dream of.

‘me too’ 64–7; see also pharmaceutical companies (‘pharma’); specific drugs Duhigg, Charles 173–4 DuPont 178–9 economic crisis: boosting clean technologies 142–3; causes of 12, 182; public sector blamed for 15, 17; varied impact of in EU 41 Economist, view on State and enterprise 16 ‘ecosystems’: see innovation ecosystems electric cars/vehicles 108, 123, 124, 133 Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) 151 Elias, John 102–3 email 104 End of Laissez Faire, The (Keynes) 4, 194 endogenous growth theory: see ‘new growth’ theory energy crisis 137, 144–5; see also green industrial revolution Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) 133 Enron 148 ‘enterprise zones’ 54 ‘entrepreneurial’ State: building of 54, 196–7; growth and inequality in 183; risk assumption and vision of 24; role of 6, 10, 21, 23; see also State Entrepreneurial State, The (report) 2, 3 entrepreneurs: DARPA’s brokering role with 77; financing of 57; investment choices of 136; myth of in Silicon Valley 63; risk types and 58–9; SBIR funding to 80, 188 EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) 150 equitable growth 13, 177, 185 European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) 101 ‘European Paradox’ 53 European Union: approach to green initiatives 124; ‘Big State’ behind innovation in 166; feed-in tariffs in 153; ‘fiscal compact’ of 42, 197; green transition targets in 115n2; gross R&D spending as percentage of GDP 43; growth producing spending in 196; investment in renewable energy 120, 121; public sectors in 17–18; R&D targets of 41; weaknesses of countries in 52–3 Evans, Peter 4 Evergreen Solar 151–2, 162 Evolutionary Theory of Economic Change, An (Nelson and Winter) 34–5 ‘evolutionary theory’ of production 34–5 ‘exogenous growth theory’ 34 externalities 4, 7, 21, 168; see also Apple Fadell, Tony 100n8; see also Apple Fairchild Semiconductor 76 fast Fourier transform (FDT) algorithm 109 feed-in tariffs: in energy technology 114; in European markets 153; German 122, 138, 149, 156; policy changes in 125n7; UK 124 Fert, Albert 96 Fiegerman, Seth 171n3 finance firms 182 financialization 25–8 FingerWorks 103 Finland 120n4, 121, 190 First Solar (formerly Solar Cells Inc.) 128–9, 151, 159–60; see also green industrial revolution Fiscal Investment Loan Program (Japan) 40 flat panel display (FPD) industry 106 Florida, Richard 107 Forbes on WuxiSuntech 153 ‘Fordist’ model of production in 38–9 Foxconn 170–71 France 61, 120, 120n4, 121 Freeman, Chris 193 Fuchs, Erica 133 Funding a Revolution: Government Support for Computing Research 63 G4S, security company 16 game theory 36 GDP, balance in categories of 30 Gedser turbine 145 Genentech Inc. 57, 69, 81 General Electric (GE) 125, 137, 147–8, 160–61, 174n5 general purpose technologies (GPTs) 62, 83 Genzyme 81, 181 Germany: feed-in tariffs 122, 138, 149, 156; government energy R&D spending 121; green revolution in 115n2, 116, 120, 122; long-term support provided by 158; public R&D spending in 61, 144–6; solar resources of 144; State investment bank 190; systems of innovation in 37; wind energy and R&D projects in 144–6, 149, 156 Ghosh, Shikhar 127 giant magnetoresistance (GMR) 96–7 GlaxoSmithKline 66–7, 82 Global Wind Energy Council (GWEC) 138–9 Goldwind 149 Goodenough, John B. 108 Google 20, 174–5 government energy R&D spending 121, 121 GPS (global positioning system) 105, 105n12 Great Transformation, The (Polanyi) 194–5 Greece, R&D/GDP 52 Green, Martin 152 green industrial revolution: ARPA-E 133–5; ‘carbon lock-in’ 117; China’s ‘green’ 5 year plan 122–4; climate change 117, 123, 135; development banks funding of 139–40, 139n14; DoE role in 132–3; Economist on 16; financial commitment for 116; funding of 116–19; global new investment in renewable energy 120; government energy R&D spending 121; government support to 114–15, 119, 129, 141–2; hurdles to 138, 156, 160; leaders in 11–12, 126; national approaches to 119–22; ‘No More Solyndras Act’ 130–31n12; patient capital 138–40; policies impacting 113–15, 119; pushing green development 136–7; renewable energy credits (RECs) 115n1; smart grid technology in 115, 118; sustainability 117, 119, 123; UK’s approach to 124–6; US approach to 126–35; venture capital in 127–9, 128n9; venture capital subsectors in 128; see also clean technology; solar power; wind power Green Investment Bank 125n7 Gronet, Chris 151 growth: economy-wide 62; effect of venture capital on 49; of firms and R&D benefit 44; firm size relationship to 45–6; ‘inclusive’ 167, 183, 195; inequality and 31, 54, 177; innovation as key source of 9, 177; measures of 33; myths about innovation and 10; national debt relationship to 18; ‘smart’ 167, 183; and technology 33–4; theories of 33–4; variables important for 18; see also equitable growth Grünberg, Peter 96, 97 Grunwald, Michael 113, 136 Haltiwanger, J 45 Hamilton, Alexander 73 Hanwha Group 157 hard disk drives (HDD) 96–7, 109 Harrison, Brian 154 Harrod, Roy F. 33 Haslam, Karen 171n3 Heymann, Matthias 145 Hoffman Electronics 150, 150n4 Hopkins, Matt 129n10, 160 House of Commons Energy and Climate Change Committee 125 Hsieh, Chang-Tai 46 HTTP/HTML 103–5, 109 Hughes, Alan 45 Hurst, Samuel 101 IBM 50, 97, 104, 107 ‘iGesture Numpad’ 103 Ill Fares the Land (Judt) 1 Immelt, Jeffrey 126 income-contingent loans and equity 189–90 income distribution 30n1 India 45–6, 120 industrial policy: challenges to 13; decentralized 78; in ‘rebalancing’ of economies 27; recent US history of 10, 21; redistributive tools needed in 167; State led 40; see also ‘picking winners’ inequality: as debilitating economic issue 177; growth impacted by 31; reducing 166, 186; shareholders as source of 183; tax cut impact on 54 information and communications technology (ICT) 50, 118 Information Processing Techniques Office (DARPA’s) 76 Innovalight 158 innovation: collective character of 183–7, 193; ‘culture’ of 87; as cumulative 167, 187; Death Valley stage of 47, 48, 122; development banks fostering 139–40; development of 3, 41–2; and distribution 186; economic growth driven by 9; firms resisting pressure for 77; global process of 155; government support for 31; in Japan 37–8; macro models on 44; myths about 10, 22; myths of R&D being about 44; ‘open innovation’ model of 25, 27; patent increase relationship to 50–51; process in energy technology 114; Schumpeterian innovation economics 5; State as a force in 5, 166; State leading in risky 62–4; stock market speculation and 49–50; tax policy impact on 51; threatened in US 24; undermining of in US 53, 183, 187; US 24; see also ‘systems of innovation’ approach innovation ecosystems: cumulative innovation curve in 167–8; open systems 193; socioeconomic prosperity dependence on 179; symbiotic vs. parasitic 23–5, 155, 162–3, 179; types of 2; see also actors ‘innovation fund’ 189 innovation networks 36, 40 innovation policy 22–3, 44, 46, 54, 167 Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations, An (Smith) 1; see also ‘Invisible Hand’ Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS) 51–2 institutional change, assessment of 36 integrated circuits 98, 98n6 Intel 130n11 intellectual property protection 110 intellectual property rights 174 International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD) 5 Internet: Apple’s use of 109; commercialization of 22; DARPA’s role in 76; and HTTP/HTML 103–5, 109; origin of 63; public funding behind 105 interventionist policy 83 investment returns, social vs. private 3–4 ‘Invisible Hand’ 30 iOS mobile operating system 89–90 iPad 102, 105, 109, 111n14 iPhone 101–3, 105–6, 109 iPlayer 16 iPod 95–6, 100–102, 105, 109, 110 Ireland 120n4, 121, 121 IRS 529 plans 111, 111n15 Italy 17, 39, 41, 52, 121 Jacobs 149 Janeway, William H. 49–50 Japan: Apple entering market of 110; computer electronics competition by 97, 98, 98n7, 106–7; economic growth of 37–8; finance system coordination by 40; flat panel display (FPD) industry of 106; government energy R&D spending 121; lithium-ion battery perfection by 108; MITI 37–8, 40; public R&D spending in 61; systems of innovation in vs.


pages: 279 words: 90,888

The Lost Decade: 2010–2020, and What Lies Ahead for Britain by Polly Toynbee, David Walker

banking crisis, battle of ideas, Boris Johnson, call centre, car-free, centre right, collective bargaining, congestion charging, corporate governance, crony capitalism, David Attenborough, Dominic Cummings, Donald Trump, Downton Abbey, energy transition, Etonian, first-past-the-post, G4S, gender pay gap, gig economy, Gini coefficient, global village, high net worth, housing crisis, income inequality, industrial robot, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), James Dyson, manufacturing employment, mass immigration, moral panic, mortgage debt, North Sea oil, offshore financial centre, payday loans, pension reform, quantitative easing, Right to Buy, Saturday Night Live, selection bias, smart meter, Uber for X, urban renewal, working-age population

Labour home secretary David Blunkett had wrung his hands ineffectually about asylum-seekers massing at Calais, and since then pictures of its camps had often appeared in the press. ‘Control’ seemed to have been lost. Asylum-seekers had been dispersed on the cheap, which meant they ended up in places with spare housing, most of which were already deprived. Many of the 1,500 asylum-seekers placed on Teesside ended up living in the Gresham area of Middlesbrough, which was already highly mixed, partly because that was where the company to which the outsourcer G4S subcontracted its commitments to the Home Office owned property. ‘Look how many they send to Rotherham. They don’t put them in Kent, do they?’ said Andy Birks, the butcher. What disturbed that town most were the Romanians and the Slovakians. ‘I can tell you that the Asians round here – very good people, been here a long time – they feel the same about those East Europeans as we do. Some of them are just here for a free ride.’

The Howard League for Penal Reform, together with the Sainsbury Foundation, persuaded chief constables to send children elsewhere, keeping most of them out of the criminal justice system, which they otherwise risked flitting in and out of for life. The numbers of young people locked up had fallen, but the Independent Monitoring Board condemned the staff shortages, lockdown and violence at the young offenders’ institution at Cookham Wood. Cost-related lapses were also recorded at the Medway Secure Training Centre, run by the contractor G4S. Prison inspectors reported disturbingly high levels of self-inflicted harm, which were increasing year on year. By 2019 – we have seen this pattern before – the Elastoplast was being unrolled and staff recruitment had begun for youth offender institutions, but going nowhere near replacing the 25 per cent of staff lost. Eventually, the MoJ got back to the future. A more sensible minister, David Gauke, expelled from the Conservative Party by Johnson, echoed Clarke in deploring the expense and ineffectiveness of custodial sentences.


Lonely Planet Greek Islands by Lonely Planet, Alexis Averbuck, Michael S Clark, Des Hannigan, Victoria Kyriakopoulos, Korina Miller

car-free, carbon footprint, credit crunch, eurozone crisis, G4S, haute couture, haute cuisine, low cost airline, low cost carrier, Norman Mailer, pension reform, period drama, sensible shoes, sustainable-tourism, trade route, transfer pricing, urban sprawl

Syntagma, Plaka & Monastiraki Top Sights Acropolis B6 Ancient Agora A3 Monastiraki Flea Market A2 Odeon of Herodes Atticus B6 Plateia Syntagmatos H2 Roman Agora C4 Sights 1 Agios Nikolaos Rangavas D5 2 Areopagus Hill A5 3 Cathedral E3 4 Centre of Folk Art & Tradition F5 5 Church of Agia Ekaterini F6 6 Church of Agios Eleftherios E3 7 Church of Kapnikarea D2 8 Church of Sotira Lykodimou G4 9 Greek Folk Art Museum F5 10 Greek Folk Art Museum: Man & Tools B4 11 Hadrian's Library B3 12 Hellenic Children's Museum F5 13 Jewish Museum G5 14 Kanellopoulos Museum B5 15 Lysikrates Monument E6 16 Museum of Greek Children's Art F4 17 Museum of Greek Popular Instruments C3 18 Museum of Traditional Greek Ceramics B2 19 National Gardens H4 20 National Historical Museum G1 21 Numismatic Museum H1 22Roman BathsG5 23 Six DOGS C1 24 Taf A2 25 Tower of the Winds C4 26 Turkish Baths C4 27Zappieo GardensG6 Activities, Courses & Tours 28 Athens Happy Train G2 29 CHAT G4 30 CitySightseeing Athens G3 Sleeping 31 Acropolis House Pension F4 32 Adonis Hotel F4 33 Adrian Hotel D3 34 Arethusa Hotel G3 35 Athens Cypria Hotel F2 36 Athens Style B1 37 Central Hotel F3 38 Electra Palace F4 39 Hotel Achilleas F1 40 Hotel Grande Bretagne H2 41 Hotel Hermes F3 42 Hotel Phaedra E6 43 John's Place F3 44Magna GreciaE2 45NEWG4 46 Niki Hotel G4 47 Plaka Hotel D2 48 Student & Travellers' Inn F5 49 Tempi Hotel C1 Eating 50 Ariston G2 51Café AvyssiniaA2 52 Filema E2 53 Glykis F5 54 Kostas D1 55 Lena's Bio G3 56 Mono E3 57 Ouzou Melathron A2 58 Palia Taverna tou Psara D4 59 Paradosiako F4 60 Platanos D4 61Pure BlissE1 62Tzitzikas & MermingasG3 63 Vizantino F5 Drinking 64 42 G1 65 Baba Au Rum E1 66 Bartessera E1 67 Booze D1 68 Brettos E6 69 Galaxy Bar G1 70 Magaze C1 71 Melina D4 72 Seven Jokers G1 73 Toy F1 74 Zonar's H1 Entertainment 75 Cine Paris E5 76 Mostrou D4 77Palea Plakiotiki Taverna StamatopoulosD4 78 Pallas H1 79 Perivoli Tou Ouranou F6 Shopping 80 Amorgos F4 81 Centre of Hellenic Tradition C2 82 Compendium F4 83 Eleftheroudakis G3 84 John Samuelin A2 85 Melissinos Art B1 86 Olgianna Melissinos A2 87 Public G2 SOUTHEAST OF THE ACROPOLIS Temple of Olympian Zeus LANDMARK, RUINS Offline map Google map ( 210 922 6330; adult/child €2/free, free with Acropolis pass; 8am-8pm Apr-Oct, 8.30am-3pm Nov-Mar; Syntagma) You can’t miss this striking marvel, smack in the centre of Athens.

National Historical Museum HISTORY MUSEUM Offline map Google map ( 210 323 7617; www.nhmuseum.gr; Stadiou 13, Syntagma; adult/child €3/free, free Sun; 9am-2pm Tue-Sun; Syntagma) Specialising in memorabilia from the War of Independence, this museum has Byron’s helmet and sword, a series of paintings depicting events leading up to the war, Byzantine and medieval exhibits, and a collection of photographs and royal portraits. The museum is housed in the old Parliament building at Plateia Kolokotroni, where Prime Minister Theodoros Deligiannis was assassinated on the steps in 1905. Psyrri, Omonia & Exarhia Top Sights Varvakios Agora (Athens Central Market)D5 Sights 1 AMP B4 2 Athens Academy G5 3 Athens University G4 4 Church of Agii Theodori E5 5 City of Athens Museum F6 6 National Library G4 7 Rebecca Camhi Gallery A3 Activities, Courses & Tours 8 Hellenic Cultural Centre D1 Sleeping 9 Athens Easy Access Hostel D2 10 Baby Grand Hotel D3 11 EP16 B5 12 Fresh Hotel D4 13 Hotel Attalos C6 14 Hotel Cecil D6 15 Hotel Exarchion G1 16 Melia E1 Eating 17Diporto AgorasC5 18 Doris E6 19 Food Company H1 20Fruit & Vegetable MarketD5 21HytraB6 22 Ivis B7 23 Kimatothrafstis H2 24Meat & Fish MarketD5 25 Papandreou D5 26 Rozalia H1 27 Taverna tou Psyrri C6 28 Telis B5 29YiantesH1 Drinking 30 Alexandrino H1 31 Circus H3 32 Fidelio B6 33 Floral H1 34 Gin Joint F6 35 Ginger Ale G1 36 Higgs D4 37 Mo Better G1 38 Second Skin B6 39 Thirio B6 40 Vox H1 Entertainment 41 AN Club G1 42 Apollon & Attikon F6 43 Astor F5 44 Asty F5 45 Hellenic Festival Box Office F5 46 Ideal F3 47 Kavouras G1 48 Olympia Theatre G3 49 Paliogramofono B6 50Stoa AthanatonD5 51 Ticket House F4 Shopping 52 Anavasi F4 53 Eleftheroudakis G6 54 Metropolis Music E2 55 Road Editions H3 56 To Pantopoleion E5 57 Xylouris F5 Numismatic Museum COIN MUSEUM Offline map Google map ( 210 363 2057; www.nma.gr; Panepistimiou 12, Syntagma; adult/child €3/free; 8.30am-3pm Tue-Sun; Syntagma) This magnificent neoclassical mansion is worth a visit, even if you have little interest in coins.

Syntagma, Plaka & Monastiraki Top Sights Acropolis B6 Ancient Agora A3 Monastiraki Flea Market A2 Odeon of Herodes Atticus B6 Plateia Syntagmatos H2 Roman Agora C4 Sights 1 Agios Nikolaos Rangavas D5 2 Areopagus Hill A5 3 Cathedral E3 4 Centre of Folk Art & Tradition F5 5 Church of Agia Ekaterini F6 6 Church of Agios Eleftherios E3 7 Church of Kapnikarea D2 8 Church of Sotira Lykodimou G4 9 Greek Folk Art Museum F5 10 Greek Folk Art Museum: Man & Tools B4 11 Hadrian's Library B3 12 Hellenic Children's Museum F5 13 Jewish Museum G5 14 Kanellopoulos Museum B5 15 Lysikrates Monument E6 16 Museum of Greek Children's Art F4 17 Museum of Greek Popular Instruments C3 18 Museum of Traditional Greek Ceramics B2 19 National Gardens H4 20 National Historical Museum G1 21 Numismatic Museum H1 22Roman BathsG5 23 Six DOGS C1 24 Taf A2 25 Tower of the Winds C4 26 Turkish Baths C4 27Zappieo GardensG6 Activities, Courses & Tours 28 Athens Happy Train G2 29 CHAT G4 30 CitySightseeing Athens G3 Sleeping 31 Acropolis House Pension F4 32 Adonis Hotel F4 33 Adrian Hotel D3 34 Arethusa Hotel G3 35 Athens Cypria Hotel F2 36 Athens Style B1 37 Central Hotel F3 38 Electra Palace F4 39 Hotel Achilleas F1 40 Hotel Grande Bretagne H2 41 Hotel Hermes F3 42 Hotel Phaedra E6 43 John's Place F3 44Magna GreciaE2 45NEWG4 46 Niki Hotel G4 47 Plaka Hotel D2 48 Student & Travellers' Inn F5 49 Tempi Hotel C1 Eating 50 Ariston G2 51Café AvyssiniaA2 52 Filema E2 53 Glykis F5 54 Kostas D1 55 Lena's Bio G3 56 Mono E3 57 Ouzou Melathron A2 58 Palia Taverna tou Psara D4 59 Paradosiako F4 60 Platanos D4 61Pure BlissE1 62Tzitzikas & MermingasG3 63 Vizantino F5 Drinking 64 42 G1 65 Baba Au Rum E1 66 Bartessera E1 67 Booze D1 68 Brettos E6 69 Galaxy Bar G1 70 Magaze C1 71 Melina D4 72 Seven Jokers G1 73 Toy F1 74 Zonar's H1 Entertainment 75 Cine Paris E5 76 Mostrou D4 77Palea Plakiotiki Taverna StamatopoulosD4 78 Pallas H1 79 Perivoli Tou Ouranou F6 Shopping 80 Amorgos F4 81 Centre of Hellenic Tradition C2 82 Compendium F4 83 Eleftheroudakis G3 84 John Samuelin A2 85 Melissinos Art B1 86 Olgianna Melissinos A2 87 Public G2 SOUTHEAST OF THE ACROPOLIS Temple of Olympian Zeus LANDMARK, RUINS Offline map Google map ( 210 922 6330; adult/child €2/free, free with Acropolis pass; 8am-8pm Apr-Oct, 8.30am-3pm Nov-Mar; Syntagma) You can’t miss this striking marvel, smack in the centre of Athens.


Croatia by Anja Mutic, Vesna Maric

call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, centre right, friendly fire, G4S, haute cuisine, low cost airline, low cost carrier, starchitect

The wooded Marjan Hill dominates the western tip of the city and has many beaches at its foothills. Split Activities, Courses & Tours 1Stairway to Marjan HillB2 Sleeping 2 Beach Hostel Split E3 3 Hotel Park E4 4 Tchaikovsky Hostel C1 5 Villa Baguc B1 6 Villa Varoš B2 Eating 7 Boban G3 Bruna (see 3) 8 Kadena G4 9 Kod Fife B2 10 Kod Joze D1 11 Konoba Matejuška B2 12 Makrovega B1 13 Pimpinella G3 14 Šperun B2 Drinking 15 Vidilica A2 16 Žbirac E4 Entertainment Egoist (see 17) 17 Hedonist G4 18 Imperium D3 Kino Bačvice (see 21) 19 Mediteranium F4 20 O'Hara F4 21 Tropic Club E4 Diocletian’s Palace HISTORICAL CENTRE Offline map Google map Facing the harbour, Diocletian’s Palace is one of the most imposing Roman ruins in existence and the place you’ll spend most of your time while in Split.

Zagreb Top Sights City Museum D1 Dolac Market E3 Lotrščak Tower C3 Museum Mimara B5 Museum of Broken Relationships C3 Trg Josipa Jelačića D3 Sights 1 Archaeological Museum E4 2 Art Pavilion E6 3 Arts & Crafts Museum B5 4 Banski Dvori C2 5 Botanical Garden C7 6 Cathedral of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary E3 7 Croatian Museum of Naïve Art C2 8 Croatian Natural History Museum C1 9 Equestrian Statue E3 10 Ethnographic Museum B5 11 Funicular Railway C3 12 Galerija Klovićevi Dvori D2 13 Galerija Nova D4 14 Gallery of Modern Art E5 15 Jesuit Church of St Catherine D3 16 Meštrović Atelier C1 17 Sabor D2 18 St Mark's Church C2 19 Statue of Dora D2 20 Stone Gate E3 21 Strossmayer Gallery of Old Masters E5 22 Technical Museum A7 Activities, Courses & Tours 23Sports & Recreational Centre ŠalataG2 Sleeping 24 Arcotel Allegra G6 25 Esplanade Zagreb Hotel D6 26 Evistas F6 27 Fulir Hostel D3 28 Hobo Bear Hostel A4 29 Hostel Day and Night G5 30 Hostel Nokturno E3 31 Hotel Central E6 32 Hotel Dubrovnik D3 33 Hotel Jadran G3 34 Hotel Jägerhorn C3 35 Omladinski Hostel E6 36 Palace Hotel E5 37 Palmers Lodge Hostel Zagreb F6 38 Shappy Hostel C4 39 Taban Hostel D1 Eating 40 Agava D2 41 Amfora D3 42 Baltazar E1 43 Boban D4 44 Čušpajz D4 45 Didov San C1 46 Dinara D4 47 Ivica i Marica D1 48 Kaptolska Klet E3 49KarijolaG3 50 Konoba Čiho F5 51 Lari & Penati E6 52 Mali Bar G3 Nokturno (see 30) 53 Pingvin D4 54 Pod Gričkim Topom C3 55 Prasac C2 56 Rubelj D3 57 Stari Fijaker 900 C3 58 Tip Top C4 59 Trilogija D2 60 Vallis Aurea C3 61 Vincek C3 62 Vinodol D4 Zinfandel's (see 25) Drinking 63 Bacchus E6 64 Booksa G4 65 Bulldog D4 66 Cafe u Dvorištu C6 67CicaD2 68 Eli's Cafe A3 69 Funk D2 70 Hemingway C5 71 Kino Europa D4 72 Klub Kino Grič E4 73 Kolaž E4 74 Lemon D4 75 Melin D2 76 Palainovka D1 77 Pivnica Medvedgrad B3 78 Stross C3 79 Tri Praščića C5 80 Velvet B3 81 Vimpi C4 Entertainment 82 Croatian National Theatre B5 83 Hotpot E5 84 Koncertna Direkcija Zagreb G5 85 KSET B7 86 Pepermint C3 87 Purgeraj E2 88 Rush Club F4 89Vatroslav Lisinski Concert HallE8 90 Vip Club E3 91 Zagrebačko Kazalište Mladih D4 Shopping 92 Antiques Market A3 93 Aromatica E3 94 Bornstein E1 95 Croata D3 96 I-GLE B3 97 Nama D3 98 Natura Croatica D4 99 Profil Megastore D4 100 Prostor C3 UPPER TOWN Museum of Broken Relationships MUSEUM Offline map Google map (http://brokenships.com; Ćirilometodska 2; adult/concession 25/20KN; 9am-10.30pm Jun–mid-Oct, 9am-9pm mid-Oct–May) Explore mementos that remain after a relationship ends at Zagreb’s quirkiest museum.


pages: 571 words: 105,054

Advances in Financial Machine Learning by Marcos Lopez de Prado

algorithmic trading, Amazon Web Services, asset allocation, backtesting, bioinformatics, Brownian motion, business process, Claude Shannon: information theory, cloud computing, complexity theory, correlation coefficient, correlation does not imply causation, diversification, diversified portfolio, en.wikipedia.org, fixed income, Flash crash, G4S, implied volatility, information asymmetry, latency arbitrage, margin call, market fragmentation, market microstructure, martingale, NP-complete, P = NP, p-value, paper trading, pattern recognition, performance metric, profit maximization, quantitative trading / quantitative finance, RAND corporation, random walk, risk-adjusted returns, risk/return, selection bias, Sharpe ratio, short selling, Silicon Valley, smart cities, smart meter, statistical arbitrage, statistical model, stochastic process, survivorship bias, transaction costs, traveling salesman

Each group forms part of φ[6, 2] = 5 testing sets, therefore this train/test split scheme allows us to compute 5 backtest paths. Figure 12.1 Paths generated for φ[6, 2] = 5 Figure 12.2 shows the assignment of each tested group to one backtest path. For example, path 1 is the result of combining the forecasts from (G1, S1), (G2, S1), (G3, S2), (G4, S3), (G5, S4) and (G6, S5). Path 2 is the result of combining forecasts from (G1, S2), (G2, S6), (G3, S6), (G4, S7), (G5, S8) and (G6, S9), and so on. Figure 12.2 Assignment of testing groups to each of the 5 paths These paths are generated by training the classifier on a portion θ = 1 − k/N of the data for each combination. Although it is theoretically possible to train on a portion θ < 1/2, in practice we will assume that k ≤ N/2. The portion of data in the training set θ increases with N → T but it decreases with k → N/2.


pages: 299 words: 19,560

Utopias: A Brief History From Ancient Writings to Virtual Communities by Howard P. Segal

1960s counterculture, British Empire, Buckminster Fuller, complexity theory, David Brooks, death of newspapers, dematerialisation, deskilling, energy security, European colonialism, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, full employment, future of journalism, G4S, garden city movement, germ theory of disease, Golden Gate Park, invention of the printing press, Isaac Newton, Jeff Bezos, John Markoff, John von Neumann, knowledge economy, liberation theology, Louis Pasteur, Mark Zuckerberg, mass immigration, means of production, Nelson Mandela, Nicholas Carr, Nikolai Kondratiev, out of africa, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Ray Kurzweil, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, Skype, stem cell, Stephen Hawking, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Stewart Brand, technoutopianism, Thomas Malthus, Thorstein Veblen, transcontinental railway, traveling salesman, union organizing, urban planning, War on Poverty, Whole Earth Catalog

Collins, “The Cancer You Can Beat,” Parade, June 20, 2010, 8, 10. 57 See Sally McGrane, “Social Norms: Online Dating and Genetics,” Time, 173 (June 29, 2009), 47. 58 Scott Kirsner, “Innovation Economy: Kiva, The Warehouse Robot Company,” Boston Sunday Globe, November 28, 2010, G1, G4; and Carolyn Y. Johnson, “Robots May Furnish Lesson in Human Trust,” Boston Globe, July 15, 2010, A1, A6. See also Peter W. Singer, “The Unmanned Mission,” Fortune, 161 (March 1, 2010), S2; Associated Press, “Robot Performs Wedding Ceremony in Tokyo,” Boston Globe, May 17, 2010, A3; and Kirsner, “You, Robot,” Boston Sunday Globe, May 30, 2010, G1, G4. Interestingly, Ramo has recently argued that robots could and should replace humans as much as possible in future space landings on Mars and elsewhere. See Simon Ramo, “Too Big a Step for Mankind,” Los Angeles Times, April 26, 2010, A15. 59 John Markoff, “Race to Build a Robot More Like Us,” Science Times, New York Times, July 12, 2011, D1. 60 See Karl Ritter, Associated Press, “Nobel Prize in Medicine Goes to In Vitro Fertilization Pioneer,” Boston Globe, October 5, 2010, A4; and Nicholas Wade, “In Vitro Fertilization Pioneer Wins Nobel Prize,” New York Times, October 5, 2010, A1, A3. 61 Quoted by Gwynne Dyer in his “A Long Way from Designing Chromosomes,” Bangor Daily News, May 25, 2010, A7. 62 Review by Deborah D.


pages: 335 words: 98,847

A Bit of a Stretch: The Diaries of a Prisoner by Chris Atkins

Boris Johnson, butterfly effect, collapse of Lehman Brothers, crowdsourcing, Donald Trump, Elon Musk, forensic accounting, G4S, housing crisis, illegal immigration, index card, Mark Zuckerberg, Milgram experiment, Panopticon Jeremy Bentham, payday loans

It does now mean that I’m indebted to the hardest dealer on Trinity. 20 December Martyn and I are delivering canteen on G Wing. We’ve now perfected our ‘bang and run’ technique, in which an officer opens the door, Martyn tosses in the bags, and I mark the name off the list. Like an Italian sports car, this process maximises speed at the expense of reliability. I realise, too late, that the guy in G4-24 has now moved to another pad, so we go back to retrieve his groceries. The cell is now occupied by one of the many tramps who’ve been admitted over the festive period. They’ve usually deliberately committed a minor offence just to get a roof over their heads and some food. This lucky vagrant clearly thought Christmas had come early when we accidentally lobbed someone else’s canteen order at his feet.

It reminds me of the collapse of Lehman Brothers, where the contagion from toxic loans swiftly infected the entire economy. The landings descend into uproar, and Martyn and I retreat from the field of battle. Hours later, I gingerly return to deliver the visit slips. G Wing is still reeling from the recent economic crash, and dozens of inmates have been trying to exact retribution on the occupant of G4-24. I can’t resist peeping in through the observation panel. The tramp has come up with a canny strategy to prevent anybody demolishing his cell, and has smashed everything up first. The bed, desk, sink and loo are in pieces, and water gushes from a broken pipe. He sits in the middle of this devastation grinning like Satan himself. A team of screws wearing blue plastic gloves march up from the centre and drag the deranged wretch to the punishment block.


I Feel Bad About My Neck by Nora Ephron

G4S, women in the workforce

Which is another thing I love about life in New York: Everything is right there. If you forgot to buy parsley, it takes only a couple of minutes to run out and get it. This is good, because I often forget to buy parsley. 4. I live at my desk. It’s eighty-four inches long and twenty-eight inches high, a custom height to avoid computer-related ailments like carpal tunnel syndrome. My desk is painted white. My computer is a Power Mac G4, and I spend most of the day and half the night at it. Only yesterday, while surfing the net, I discovered that there’s an expression for what I am—a mouse potato. It means someone who’s as connected to her computer as couch potatoes are to their television sets. My favorite thing about my desk is that it has a huge drawer on the lower left side that contains a monster wastebasket. I probably didn’t invent the concept of building a wastebasket into a desk, but I might have, and whether I did or not, it feels like a breakthrough.


pages: 312 words: 35,664

The Mathematics of Banking and Finance by Dennis W. Cox, Michael A. A. Cox

barriers to entry, Brownian motion, call centre, correlation coefficient, fixed income, G4S, inventory management, iterative process, linear programming, meta analysis, meta-analysis, pattern recognition, random walk, traveling salesman, value at risk

As a more advanced modelling approach could come up with a better solution, can an improved solution be obtained in this case? To achieve this start by defining gk (i; t1 , . . . , tk ) to be the minimum route from town i to the chosen destination, say A, passing through the k remaining towns t1 , . . . , tk in any order. The process is conducted by successively calculating the set of values corresponding to g1 , g2 , g3 and then finally g4 . Using forward recursion the successive terms are set out in Tables 19.8, 19.9 and 19.10. In Table 19.8, di j is the distance between towns i and j. For example, g1 (C; B) is the distance of the route from C via the one branch (B) to return home (A). Table 19.8 First-order terms g1 (C; B) = dCB + dBA = 11 g1 (B; C) = dBC + dCA = 13 g1 (B; D) = dBD + dDA = 22 g1 (B; E) = dBE + dEA = 25 g1 (D; B) = dDB + dBA = 18 g1 (D; C) = dDC + dCA = 15 g1 (C; D) = dCD + dDA = 17 g1 (C; E) = dCE + dEA = 18 g1 (E; B) = dEB + dBA = 17 g1 (E; C) = dEC + dCA = 12 g1 (E; D) = dED + dDA = 15 g1 (D; E) = dDE + dEA = 19 Dynamic Programming 187 Table 19.9 Second-order terms Sequence g2 (D; CB) = min(dDC g2 (E; CB) = min(dEC g2 (C; DB) = min(dCD g2 (E; DB) = min(dED g2 (C; EB) = min(dCE g2 (D; EB) = min(dDE g2 (B; CD) = min(dBD g2 (E; DC) = min(dED g2 (B; EC) = min(dBE g2 (D; EC) = min(dDE g2 (B; ED) = min(dBE g2 (C; ED) = min(dCE + g1 (C; B)* , dDB + g1 (C; B)* , dEB + g1 (D; B)* , dCB + g1 (D; B)* , dEB + g1 (E; B)* , dCB + g1 (E; B)* , dDB + g1 (D; C)* , dBC + g1 (D; C)* , dEC + g1 (E; C)* , dBC + g1 (E; C)* , dDC + g1 (E; D)* , dBD + g1 (E; D)* , dCD + g1 (B; C)) = 19 + g1 (B; C)) = 16 + g1 (B; D)) = 26 + g1 (B; D)) = 24 + g1(B; E)) = 22 + g1 (B; E)) = 23 + g1 (C; D)) = 23 + g1 (C; D)) = 21 + g1 (C; E)) = 24 + g1 (C; E)) = 18 + g1 (D; E)) = 27 + g1 (D; E)) = 20 D →C →B E →C →B C →D →B E →D →B C →E →B D →E →B B →C →D E →D →C B →E →C D →E →C B →E →D C →E →D Table 19.10 Third-order terms Sequence g3 (E; DCB) = min(dED + g2 (D; CB)* , dEC + g2 (C; DB), dEB + g2 (B; CD)) = 25 g3 (D; ECB) = min(dDE + g2 (E; CB)* , dDC + g2 (C; EB), dDB + g2 (B; EC)) = 22 g3 (C; EDB) = min(dCE + g2 (E; DB)* , dCD + g2 (D; EB), dCB + g2 (B; ED)) = 29 g3 (B; CED) = min(dBE + g2 (E; DC)* , dBD + g2 (D; EC), dBC + g2 (C; ED)) = 26 E →D→C →B D →E→C →B C →E→D →B B →C→E →D In Tables 19.9 and 19.10 the selected route in each case has been denoted by an asterisk (* ) and the optimum selection being recorded in the final column.

Table 19.8 First-order terms g1 (C; B) = dCB + dBA = 11 g1 (B; C) = dBC + dCA = 13 g1 (B; D) = dBD + dDA = 22 g1 (B; E) = dBE + dEA = 25 g1 (D; B) = dDB + dBA = 18 g1 (D; C) = dDC + dCA = 15 g1 (C; D) = dCD + dDA = 17 g1 (C; E) = dCE + dEA = 18 g1 (E; B) = dEB + dBA = 17 g1 (E; C) = dEC + dCA = 12 g1 (E; D) = dED + dDA = 15 g1 (D; E) = dDE + dEA = 19 Dynamic Programming 187 Table 19.9 Second-order terms Sequence g2 (D; CB) = min(dDC g2 (E; CB) = min(dEC g2 (C; DB) = min(dCD g2 (E; DB) = min(dED g2 (C; EB) = min(dCE g2 (D; EB) = min(dDE g2 (B; CD) = min(dBD g2 (E; DC) = min(dED g2 (B; EC) = min(dBE g2 (D; EC) = min(dDE g2 (B; ED) = min(dBE g2 (C; ED) = min(dCE + g1 (C; B)* , dDB + g1 (C; B)* , dEB + g1 (D; B)* , dCB + g1 (D; B)* , dEB + g1 (E; B)* , dCB + g1 (E; B)* , dDB + g1 (D; C)* , dBC + g1 (D; C)* , dEC + g1 (E; C)* , dBC + g1 (E; C)* , dDC + g1 (E; D)* , dBD + g1 (E; D)* , dCD + g1 (B; C)) = 19 + g1 (B; C)) = 16 + g1 (B; D)) = 26 + g1 (B; D)) = 24 + g1(B; E)) = 22 + g1 (B; E)) = 23 + g1 (C; D)) = 23 + g1 (C; D)) = 21 + g1 (C; E)) = 24 + g1 (C; E)) = 18 + g1 (D; E)) = 27 + g1 (D; E)) = 20 D →C →B E →C →B C →D →B E →D →B C →E →B D →E →B B →C →D E →D →C B →E →C D →E →C B →E →D C →E →D Table 19.10 Third-order terms Sequence g3 (E; DCB) = min(dED + g2 (D; CB)* , dEC + g2 (C; DB), dEB + g2 (B; CD)) = 25 g3 (D; ECB) = min(dDE + g2 (E; CB)* , dDC + g2 (C; EB), dDB + g2 (B; EC)) = 22 g3 (C; EDB) = min(dCE + g2 (E; DB)* , dCD + g2 (D; EB), dCB + g2 (B; ED)) = 29 g3 (B; CED) = min(dBE + g2 (E; DC)* , dBD + g2 (D; EC), dBC + g2 (C; ED)) = 26 E →D→C →B D →E→C →B C →E→D →B B →C→E →D In Tables 19.9 and 19.10 the selected route in each case has been denoted by an asterisk (* ) and the optimum selection being recorded in the final column. For example, g2 (D; CB) is the distance of the route from D via the two branches C and B (in any order) to return home (A). If C had been chosen as the second branch, then the remaining distance is g1 (C; B). That is, the distance from C via B to reach A. Finally for the fourth-order terms are calculated: g4 (A; DECB) = min(dAE + g3 (E; DCB), dAD + g3 (D; ECB)* , dAC + g3 (C; EDB), dAB + g3 (B; CED)* ) = 31 The desired route is either A →D →E →C →B →A or A →B →C →E →D →A, one simply being the reverse of the other. 20 Decision Theory 20.1 INTRODUCTION Throughout business, directors, managers and employees are required to make a series of decisions. These will vary from simple decisions such as the provider of electricity or the order in which a series of tasks should be conducted, to more complex decisions related to treasury management issues or strategic management.


pages: 350 words: 109,379

How to Run a Government: So That Citizens Benefit and Taxpayers Don't Go Crazy by Michael Barber

Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Atul Gawande, battle of ideas, Berlin Wall, Black Swan, Checklist Manifesto, collapse of Lehman Brothers, collective bargaining, deliberate practice, facts on the ground, failed state, fear of failure, full employment, G4S, illegal immigration, invisible hand, libertarian paternalism, Mark Zuckerberg, Nate Silver, North Sea oil, obamacare, performance metric, Potemkin village, Ronald Reagan, school choice, The Signal and the Noise by Nate Silver, transaction costs, WikiLeaks

Dame Tessa Jowell, the politician who oversaw the London Olympics from concept to delivery, was a master of building these relationships. The 2012 Games were a huge triumph as everyone knows, but even here there were setbacks. The most visible was not long before the Games when the company G4S admitted it had not been able to recruit sufficient security people for all the venues. The military stepped in (and loved it), and all went well. When I asked Tessa to reflect on this experience, she said she wished now that they had embedded a senior civil servant inside G4S from the start so that communication would have been constant, and nasty surprises, such as the one the country got, would have been avoided. Relationships again. Marty Linsky, in the same conversation, put it more grandly, ‘The work of transformational leadership is about human dynamics.’


pages: 372 words: 116,005

The Secret Barrister: Stories of the Law and How It's Broken by Secret Barrister

cognitive bias, Donald Trump, G4S, glass ceiling, haute cuisine, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), mandatory minimum, race to the bottom, Schrödinger's Cat, statistical model

Because hours before the third hearing was due to be called on, police officers belatedly knocked at the proffered address, only to be turned away by an irate elderly lady, who had no knowledge of or connection to any Albanian street gangs, but a despairing familiarity with her address being given by their members to unwitting courts. But for the judge’s largesse in allowing us a final opportunity to do what we should have done months earlier, the defendants would have been bailed, no doubt never to be seen again, and a little old lady would have had to spend yet another evening explaining to G4S security staff why they couldn’t install electronic monitoring equipment in her bungalow. We got lucky. It is not always so. Other judges would have lost patience, and rightly so. Too often, it seems, these are ‘just’ bail apps. In an age of straitened police resources, they’re simply not a priority. Notwithstanding the chaotic, slapdash handling of bail applications by the prosecuting authorities at the outset of proceedings, an entirely different mentality kicks in once a defendant has been safely remanded into custody.

I ask whether the prison sentence in a hypothetical scenario is ‘enough’ or ‘too much’, as if the inquiry ends once our vengeance is sated by the quotient of punishment. Those are the terms of our public debate. And I should know better. I’ve been in the court prison cell when mentally ill clients, who have just been imprisoned for serious, nasty offences, have been smashing their heads against the cell walls, howling as hordes of G4S officers rush in to tackle them to the ground ‘For Their Own Safety’. It is clear that the only thing that their incarceration will do is satisfy our need for punishment, when so much more is required. Our national fetish has seen the England and Wales prison population soar by 90 per cent since 1990, standing at 85,500.26 We imprison people at a higher rate (146 per 100,000) than anywhere in Western Europe.


Mining of Massive Datasets by Jure Leskovec, Anand Rajaraman, Jeffrey David Ullman

cloud computing, crowdsourcing, en.wikipedia.org, first-price auction, G4S, information retrieval, John Snow's cholera map, Netflix Prize, NP-complete, PageRank, pattern recognition, random walk, recommendation engine, second-price auction, sentiment analysis, social graph, statistical model, web application

Since we already observed that the competitive ratio is no more than 1/2, we now conclude the ratio is exactly 1/2. 8.3.4Exercises for Section 8.3 EXERCISE 8.3.1Define the graph Gn to have the 2n nodes a0, a1, . . . , an−1, b0, b1, . . . , bn−1 and the following edges. Each node ai, for i = 0, 1, . . . , n − 1, is connected to the nodes bj and bk, where j = 2i mod n and k = (2i + 1) mod n For instance, the graph G4 has the following edges: (a0, b0), (a0, b1), (a1, b2), (a1, b3), (a2, b0), (a2, b1), (a3, b2), and (a3, b3). (a)Find a perfect matching for G4. (b)Find a perfect matching for G5. !! (c)Prove that for every n, Gn has a perfect matching. ! EXERCISE 8.3.2How many perfect matchings do the graphs G4 and G5 of Exercise 8.3.1 have? ! EXERCISE 8.3.3Whether or not the greedy algorithm gives us a perfect matching for the graph of Fig. 8.1 depends on the order in which we consider the edges. Of the 6! possible orders of the six edges, how many give us a perfect matching?


The Art of Computer Programming: Sorting and Searching by Donald Ervin Knuth

card file, Claude Shannon: information theory, complexity theory, correlation coefficient, Donald Knuth, double entry bookkeeping, Eratosthenes, Fermat's Last Theorem, G4S, information retrieval, iterative process, John von Neumann, linked data, locality of reference, Menlo Park, Norbert Wiener, NP-complete, p-value, Paul Erdős, RAND corporation, refrigerator car, sorting algorithm, Vilfredo Pareto, Yogi Berra, Zipf's Law

-a, 0 or 0 -)-B(S). 466 62 63 64 65 66 61 68 69 10 11 12 13 74 15 16 11 18 19 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 81 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 91 98 99 100 101 SEARCHING A8L A7R A9R A8R 8H A10 Tl T2 6H 7H DONE LDX STX LDX STX ST4 JMP J2N J2Z ENT1 LD2 J2P LD1 LDX STX ST3 LD2 LDX STX LDX STX LDX STX ST4 STZ CMP4 JNE ST1 JMP ST1 JMP CON CON CON CON ENTX STX LDX INCX STX EQU T2,2 0,3(B) O.l(RLINK) O,4(LLINK) O.l(RLINK) 8F DONE • 6F 0,3 0,3(B) A8R 0,3(LLINK) O.KRLINK) 0,3(LLINK) O.KRLINK) O,1(B) T2,2 0,4(B) T1.2 0,3(B) O.l(LLINK) 0,4(RLINK) O.l(LLINK) O,1(B) 0,5(RLINK) *+3 0,5(RLINK) DONE 0,5(LLINK) DONE +1 0 0 -1 +1 0,4(B) HEAD(LLINK) 1 HEAD(LLINK) * HI HI Gl Gl Gl Gl U2 G2 + J2 G2 G2 G2 H2 HI HI H2 H2 H2 H2 H2 H2 G2 G2 G2 G G G G3 G3 G4 G4 J2 J J J J 1-5 0, 0, or a -»¦ B(R). A8. Single rotation. LINK(o.S) «- LINK(-o.P). LINK(-o.P) «-S. Join up with the other branch Exit if rI2 = -a. Jump if B(S) was zero. P «-R. rI2«-B(R). To A8 if rI2 = a. A9. Double rotation. LINK (a,P <-LINK(-a,R)) ->LINK(-o,R). LINK (a, P) -e-R. rI2 -e-B(P). -a, 0 or 0 -)-B(S). 0, 0, or a -)-B(R). A8. Single rotation. LINK (a, S) -e-LINK(-a.P). LINK(-a.P) -e-S.

Consider the following algorithm, which operates on reverse plane partitions of a given shape and constructs another array of numbers qij having the same shape: Gl. [Initialize.] Set ql3 <- 0 for 1 < j < n{ and 1 < i < n[. Then set j <- 1. G2. [Find nonzero cell.] If pn>j > 0, set i «— n'j, k <- j, and go on to step G3. Otherwise if j < m, increase j by 1 and repeat this step. Otherwise stop (the p array is now zero). G3. [Decrease p.] Decrease pik by 1. G4. [Move up or right.] If i > 1 and P(i-i)k > Pik, decrease i by 1 and return to G3. Otherwise if k < ni, increase A; by 1 and return to G3. G5. [Increase q.} Increase qij by 1 and return to G2. | Prove that this construction defines a one-to-one correspondence between reverse plane partitions of m and solutions of the equation m = where the numbers hij are the hook lengths of the shape, by designing an algorithm that recomputes the p's from the g's. 36.

Then perform step G2 for j = 1, 2, ..., n, and go to G3. G2. [Absorb Wj.] (At this point we have the basic condition WT(Pi_i) > WT(Pi+i) for 1 < i < t; C1) in other words, the weights in the working array are -descending.") Per- Perform Subroutine C below, zero or more times, until WT(Pt_i) > Wj. Then set t «- t + 1 and Pt «- Xj. G3. [Finish phase 1.] Perform Subroutine C zero or more times, until t = 1. G4. [Do phase 2.] (Now Pi = X2n is the root of a binary tree, and WT(Pi) = Wq + - ¦ ¦+wn.) Set Ik to the distance of node X& from node Pi, for 0 < k < n. (See exercise 43. An example is shown in Fig. 18, where level numbers appear at the right of each node.) G5. [Do phase 3.] By changing the links of Xn+i, ..., X2n, construct a new binary tree having the same level numbers /&, but with the leaf nodes in symmetric order Xq, ..., Xn.


pages: 337 words: 40,257

Pocket Milan & the Lakes by Lonely Planet, Paula Hardy

G4S, haute cuisine, Murano, Venice glass, plutocrats, Plutocrats, starchitect

Quadrilatero d’Oro & Giardini Pubblici Top Sights Museo Poldi-PezzoliB5 Sights 1 Casa Museo Boschi-di Stefano F2 2 Giardini Pubblici D3 3 Museo Bagatti Valsecchi C4 4 Padiglione d'Arte Contemporanea D3 5 Museo Civico di Storia Naturale D3 6 Spazio Oberdan E3 7 E'SPA at Gianfranco Ferré C4 8 Spiga 8 Spa at Hotel Baglioni D4 Eating 9 Il Teatro C4 10 Trattoria Temperanza 'Da Abele' H1 11 Lon Fon D2 12 Joia D2 13 Pizzeria Spontini G1 Drinking 14 Pandenus E2 15 HClub E3 16 La Belle Aurore G4 17 Torrefazione II Caffè Ambrosiano F2 18 L'Elephante F3 19 Bar Basso H2 20 Armani Privé B4 Shopping 21 Aspesi C5 22 Car Shoe D5 23 Casadei C5 24 Driade C4 25 Etro C5 26 Gallo B4 27 Habits Culti D4 28 Pellini B4 29 Sermoneta C4 Top Sights Museo Poldi-Pezzoli Offline map Google map 02 79 48 89 www.museopoldipezzoli.it Via Alessandro Manzoni 12 adult/reduced €9/6 10am-6pm Wed-Mon Montenapoleone Having inherited his vast fortune at the age of 24, Gian Giacomo Poldi Pezzoli also inherited his mother’s love of art.


pages: 419 words: 130,627

Last Man Standing: The Ascent of Jamie Dimon and JPMorgan Chase by Duff McDonald

bank run, Blythe Masters, Bonfire of the Vanities, centralized clearinghouse, collateralized debt obligation, conceptual framework, corporate governance, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, Exxon Valdez, financial innovation, fixed income, G4S, housing crisis, interest rate swap, Jeff Bezos, John Meriwether, Kickstarter, laissez-faire capitalism, Long Term Capital Management, margin call, market bubble, money market fund, moral hazard, negative equity, Nelson Mandela, Northern Rock, profit motive, Renaissance Technologies, risk/return, Rod Stewart played at Stephen Schwarzman birthday party, Saturday Night Live, sovereign wealth fund, statistical model, Steve Ballmer, Steve Jobs, technology bubble, The Chicago School, too big to fail, Vanguard fund, zero-coupon bond, zero-sum game

The deal nearly came apart when Dimon discovered some $60 million in severance agreements for Primerica’s executives in the event of a sale. Further due diligence revealed that amount to be $90 million. After raging about the excessiveness of it all, Weill engaged in a startling display of hypocrisy by agreeing to the majority of the payouts when Tsai threw in a $20 million private jet, a Gulfstream G4, as part of the sale. Dimon eventually decided that a fair price was one share of Commercial Credit stock and $7 in cash for each share of Primerica, giving the deal a value of $1.7 billion. After a flurry of further negotiations and board presentations, the sale was announced on August 29, 1988. Every single person involved on the Commercial Credit side would go on to give the 32-year-old Dimon primary credit for structuring the transaction.

It took a hurricane, however, to get the deal done. On August 24, Hurricane Andrew pounded Florida and exposed the already weak Travelers to a welter of new claims. That gave Weill and Dimon the chance to put the screws to Budd, extracting more control—27 percent of the company and four, not two, board seats—for $722 million. Still stinging from his $90 million payout to Tsai’s team (the gift of the G4 notwithstanding), Weill also demanded that the executives on Budd’s team give up their golden parachutes. On September 20, the deal was announced, along with 3,500 job cuts. In December, both Weill and Dimon were named directors at Travelers. Bob Lipp was sent to Hartford as an emissary of Primerica. Weill also picked up a valuable executive trinket. Travelers was a sponsor of the Masters Golf Tournament at Augusta National Golf Club, a connection he later exploited to become a member of Augusta itself.


Israel & the Palestinian Territories Travel Guide by Lonely Planet

active transport: walking or cycling, airport security, Albert Einstein, back-to-the-land, bike sharing scheme, carbon footprint, centre right, clean water, coronavirus, G4S, game design, illegal immigration, Khartoum Gordon, Louis Pasteur, sensible shoes, Silicon Valley, Skype, South China Sea, special economic zone, spice trade, trade route, urban planning, Yom Kippur War, zero-sum game

German Colony & Rehavia Little House in RehaviaHOTEL ( MAP GOOGLE MAP ; %02-563 3344; www.jerusalem-hotel.co.il; 20 Ibn Ezra St, Rehavia; s 450NIS, d 600-690NIS; aW) There's a boutique feel to this hotel in a restored 1942 stone building. Located in one of Jerusalem’s prettiest neighbourhoods (a 1.5km walk to the Old City), it has 28 rooms, a roof terrace, a garden and a strictly kosher dining room where a daily breakfast and Shabbat lunch and dinner are served. Arcadia Ba'MoshavaHOTEL ( GOOGLE MAP ; %02-542 3000; www.arcadiahotels.co.il; 13 Yehoshua bin-Nun St; s/d midweek US$240/270, weekend US$270/300; aiW; g4, 18, 21) Opened in 2014 after a major restoration, this hotel occupies a gorgeous Arab-style villa dating from 1935. 'Ba'Moshava' means 'in the Colony' and its location in a residential street off the Emek Refa’im shopping and entertainment strip is excellent. Rooms are smallish, but that won't matter, as you'll spend most of your time in the elegant lounge or leafy garden. The hotel provides bikes for the use of its guests.

The food is good rather than great, but the surrounds are comfortable, there's an excellent wine list and service is attentive. German Colony There are plenty of chain cafes and burger joints along Emek Refa’im St, but no restaurants of note. AdomMEDITERRANEAN ( MAP GOOGLE MAP ; %02-624 6242; First Station, 4 David Remez St; salads 46-52NIS, mains 62-128NIS; hnoon-midnight Sun-Fri, noon-4.30pm & 6pm-midnight Sat; g4, 18, 21) If you can overlook the inadequecies of its service, this bustling place in the Old Jerusalem Train Station is a decent option for lunch or dinner. The outdoor terrace and indoor bar and dining area are equally popular with its cashed-up regulars, who tend to order the burger or a salad. It's particularly busy on Shabbat. Givat Ram & Museum Row oModernISRAELI ( GOOGLE MAP ; %02-648 0862; www.modern.co.il; Israel Museum, Ruppin Rd, Givat Ram; tapas platter 95NIS, mains 62-120NIS; h11.30am-5pm Sun-Thu, to 11pm Tue & Wed Aug only; v; g7, 9, 14, 35, 66) Talented chef Avi Peretz devises delicious menus that feature traditional Israeli dishes with a modern twist.

Mike's PlacePUB ( MAP GOOGLE MAP ; %054 799 1220; www.mikesplacebars.com; 33 Jaffa Rd; h11am-late, closed Shabbat; jJaffa Center) There's nothing secret about Mike's well-honed formula for success: Guinness, open-mic nights, live rock bands and sport on the big screen. At the top of the Rivlin St bar strip, it has an indoor area plus a few outdoor tables that offer excellent people-watching opportunities. German Colony CoffeemillCAFE ( GOOGLE MAP ; %02-566 1665; 23 Emek Refa’im St; h7am-midnight Sun-Thu, to 3pm Fri; g4, 18, 21) Decorated with covers of the New Yorker and with wooden drawers full of an exotic array of coffee beans, this bohemian-flavoured cafe is a good place for cake and a shot of caffeine. LGBT JERUSALEM Owing to Jerusalem’s religious nature, the city’s lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender scene is much more subdued than its Tel Aviv equivalent. Public displays of affection, especially between same-sex couples, will be unwelcome in Jewish Orthodox areas and East Jerusalem.


Southwest USA Travel Guide by Lonely Planet

1919 Motor Transport Corps convoy, Albert Einstein, Berlin Wall, Burning Man, carbon footprint, Columbine, Donner party, El Camino Real, friendly fire, G4S, haute couture, haute cuisine, housing crisis, illegal immigration, immigration reform, indoor plumbing, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), low earth orbit, off grid, place-making, supervolcano, trade route, transcontinental railway, walkable city, Works Progress Administration, X Prize

Opening hours change seasonally for many of the area’s museums and restaurants, with earlier hours in summer. PHOENIX At first glance, Downtown Phoenix appears to be all buttoned-up business and bureaucracy (the state capitol is here), but there’s actually plenty of partying going on in its cultural venues, sports stadiums, bars and restaurants. There’s even a small alternative art scene. Phoenix Top Sights Desert Botanical Garden G4 Heard Museum C4 Pueblo Grande Museum & Archaeological Park E5 Sights 1'A' Mountain G5 2ASU Art Museum G6 3Gammage Auditorium G6 4Hall of Flame F5 5Mill Avenue G6 6Phoenix Zoo F5 Splash Playground (see 7) 7Tempe Beach Park G5 8Tempe Center for the Arts G5 Activities, Courses & Tours 9Piestewa Peak/Dreamy Draw Recreation Area D1 Tempe Town Lake Boat Rentals (see 7) Sleeping 10Aloft Phoenix-Airport E5 11Arizona Biltmore Resort & Spa D2 12Best Western Inn of Tempe G5 13Clarendon Hotel B3 14FireSky Resort & Spa G3 15Hermosa Inn E2 16Royal Palms Resort & Spa F3 17Sanctuary on Camelback Mountain F2 Eating 18Barrio Café C4 19Chelsea's Kitchen E2 20Da Vang B3 21Dick's Hideaway C2 22Durant's C4 23Essence F6 24Noca D2 25Pane Bianco C3 26Pita Jungle G6 27Tee Pee Mexican Food E3 Drinking Edge Bar (see 17) 28Four Peaks Brewing Company G6 Lux Coffeebar (see 25) 29Postino Winecafé Arcadia E3 30Vig E3 Entertainment 31Char's Has the Blues B3 32Phoenix Theatre C4 33Rhythm Room C3 Shopping 34Biltmore Fashion Park D2 35Borgata G2 36Garden Shop at the Desert Botanical Garden G4 37Heard Museum Shop C4 Heard Museum MUSEUM (602-252-8848; www.heard.org; 2301 N Central Ave; adult/child 6-12/student/senior $15/7.50/7.50/13.50; 9:30am-5pm Mon-Sat, 11am-5pm Sun; ) This extraordinary museum is a magical mystery tour through the history, life, arts and culture of Native American tribes in the Southwest.

Phoenix Top Sights Desert Botanical Garden G4 Heard Museum C4 Pueblo Grande Museum & Archaeological Park E5 Sights 1'A' Mountain G5 2ASU Art Museum G6 3Gammage Auditorium G6 4Hall of Flame F5 5Mill Avenue G6 6Phoenix Zoo F5 Splash Playground (see 7) 7Tempe Beach Park G5 8Tempe Center for the Arts G5 Activities, Courses & Tours 9Piestewa Peak/Dreamy Draw Recreation Area D1 Tempe Town Lake Boat Rentals (see 7) Sleeping 10Aloft Phoenix-Airport E5 11Arizona Biltmore Resort & Spa D2 12Best Western Inn of Tempe G5 13Clarendon Hotel B3 14FireSky Resort & Spa G3 15Hermosa Inn E2 16Royal Palms Resort & Spa F3 17Sanctuary on Camelback Mountain F2 Eating 18Barrio Café C4 19Chelsea's Kitchen E2 20Da Vang B3 21Dick's Hideaway C2 22Durant's C4 23Essence F6 24Noca D2 25Pane Bianco C3 26Pita Jungle G6 27Tee Pee Mexican Food E3 Drinking Edge Bar (see 17) 28Four Peaks Brewing Company G6 Lux Coffeebar (see 25) 29Postino Winecafé Arcadia E3 30Vig E3 Entertainment 31Char's Has the Blues B3 32Phoenix Theatre C4 33Rhythm Room C3 Shopping 34Biltmore Fashion Park D2 35Borgata G2 36Garden Shop at the Desert Botanical Garden G4 37Heard Museum Shop C4 Heard Museum MUSEUM (602-252-8848; www.heard.org; 2301 N Central Ave; adult/child 6-12/student/senior $15/7.50/7.50/13.50; 9:30am-5pm Mon-Sat, 11am-5pm Sun; ) This extraordinary museum is a magical mystery tour through the history, life, arts and culture of Native American tribes in the Southwest. It emphasizes quality over quantity and is one of the best museums of its kind in America.

Downtown Santa Fe Top Sights Georgia O'Keeffe Museum D2 Loretto Chapel F4 St Francis Cathedral F3 Sights 1 78th St Gallery H4 2 Absolute Nirvana Spa & Tea Room H3 Avanyu Spa (see 28) 3 Economos/Hampton Galleries H5 4 Gerald Peters Gallery G5 LewAllen Gallery (see 29) Marc Navarro Gallery (see 3) Morning Star Gallery (see 58) 5 Museum of Contemporary Native Arts F3 6 Nedra Matteucci Galleries G6 7 New Mexico History Museum E2 8 New Mexico Museum of Art E2 9 Palace of the Governors F2 10 San Miguel Mission F5 Santa Fe Clay (see 16) 11 Santuario de Guadalupe C3 12 Shiprock F3 13 SITE Santa Fe A6 Tai Gallery (see 39) Activities, Courses & Tours 14 High Desert Angler C5 15 Sangre de Cristo Mountain Works B4 16 Santa Fe Clay A5 17 Santa Fe School of Cooking E3 18 Santa Fe Southern Railway B4 Sleeping 19 El Paradero C5 20 Garrett's Desert Inn F4 21 Hotel St Francis E3 22 Inn & Spa at Loretto F4 23 Inn of the Anasazi F2 24 Inn of the Five Graces E4 25 Inn of the Governors D4 26 Inn on the Alameda G4 27 La Fonda F3 28 La Posada de Santa Fe H3 29 Sage Inn A6 Eating 30 Cafe Pasqual's E3 31 Cleopatra Cafe C4 32 Cowgirl Hall of Fame C3 33 Coyote Café E3 34 Del Churro Saloon E4 35 Flying Star Café A5 French Pastry Shop (see 27) 36 Guadalupe Cafe E5 37 Il Vicino D2 Raaga (see 38) 38 Ristra B3 39 Santa Fe Farmers Market A5 40 SantaCafé F1 41 Shed F3 42 Tia Sophia's D2 43 Tomasita's B4 44 Zia Diner B4 Drinking 45 Aztec Café C3 Bell Tower Bar (see 27) 46 Dragon Room Bar F5 47 Evangelo's E3 48 Marble Brewery Tap Room E3 49 Ore House E3 50 Second St Brewery A5 Entertainment 51 Lensic Performing ArtsTheatre D2 52 Santa Fe Playhouse E4 Santa Fe Symphony (see 51) 53 Vanessie of Santa Fe C2 Shopping 54 Garcia Street Books H6 55 Kowboyz B5 56 Nambé Foundry Outlet E3 57 Nambé Foundry Outlet G5 58 Nathalie H5 59 Seret & Sons D3 60 Travel Bug G4 While you’re here in one of the top-rated cultural towns in the United States, plan tospend time in some of the city’s museums.


pages: 475 words: 155,554

The Default Line: The Inside Story of People, Banks and Entire Nations on the Edge by Faisal Islam

Asian financial crisis, asset-backed security, balance sheet recession, bank run, banking crisis, Basel III, Ben Bernanke: helicopter money, Berlin Wall, Big bang: deregulation of the City of London, Boris Johnson, British Empire, capital controls, carbon footprint, Celtic Tiger, central bank independence, centre right, collapse of Lehman Brothers, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, crony capitalism, dark matter, deindustrialization, Deng Xiaoping, disintermediation, energy security, Eugene Fama: efficient market hypothesis, eurozone crisis, financial deregulation, financial innovation, financial repression, floating exchange rates, forensic accounting, forward guidance, full employment, G4S, ghettoisation, global rebalancing, global reserve currency, hiring and firing, inflation targeting, Irish property bubble, Just-in-time delivery, labour market flexibility, light touch regulation, London Whale, Long Term Capital Management, margin call, market clearing, megacity, Mikhail Gorbachev, mini-job, mittelstand, moral hazard, mortgage debt, mortgage tax deduction, mutually assured destruction, Myron Scholes, negative equity, North Sea oil, Northern Rock, offshore financial centre, open economy, paradox of thrift, Pearl River Delta, pension reform, price mechanism, price stability, profit motive, quantitative easing, quantitative trading / quantitative finance, race to the bottom, regulatory arbitrage, reserve currency, reshoring, Right to Buy, rising living standards, Ronald Reagan, savings glut, shareholder value, sovereign wealth fund, The Chicago School, the payments system, too big to fail, trade route, transaction costs, two tier labour market, unorthodox policies, uranium enrichment, urban planning, value at risk, WikiLeaks, working-age population, zero-sum game

The banks were still officially shut pending the passage into law of the EU deposit-raid agreement. In central Nicosia the first victims were the elderly, many of whom had never had to use a cash machine before. The mood on the island was febrile, if not yet panicked. Ordinary Cypriots queued at ATMs for money replenished once a day by the nation’s new emergency service: security vans full of euros run by British contractor G4S. On the streets, Cypriots were broadly consistent in their view as to who was to blame: Germany. Germany, they insisted, was trying to drive Russian deposits off the island, with the intention of gaining primacy in the race for Cyprus’s abundant gas reserves. Before the parliamentary vote, protestors surrounded the German embassy and tore down the German flag. Credit and debit card payments were working only fitfully, as merchants feared having to pay the deposit tax on such transactions.

Elsewhere at Larnaca Airport, at the customs desk between security and passport control, a new sign appeared. It said: ‘Movement of currency up to one thousand euro per passenger only.’ And this applied even to passengers flying within the EU. It was just one of a number of decrees restricting the movement of currency in and out of bank accounts, cash machines and off the island. Meanwhile, fanning out from the Central Bank in Nicosia, G4S security vans sped across the island, shadowed by police cars. Their task? To deliver the cash before the reopening of bank branches at noon. In Larnaca there were queues of two or three dozen people waiting outside each branch. It was an orderly affair. At a BoC branch, names of clients had been placed on a list in arrival order, enabling people to sit in the shade of a nearby tree. At a branch of the Cooperative Bank, the elderly were ushered to the front of the queue.


pages: 202 words: 59,883

Age of Context: Mobile, Sensors, Data and the Future of Privacy by Robert Scoble, Shel Israel

Albert Einstein, Apple II, augmented reality, call centre, Chelsea Manning, cloud computing, connected car, Edward Snowden, Edward Thorp, Elon Musk, factory automation, Filter Bubble, G4S, Google Earth, Google Glasses, Internet of things, job automation, John Markoff, Kickstarter, lifelogging, Marc Andreessen, Mars Rover, Menlo Park, Metcalfe’s law, New Urbanism, PageRank, pattern recognition, RFID, ride hailing / ride sharing, Robert Metcalfe, Saturday Night Live, self-driving car, sensor fusion, Silicon Valley, Skype, smart grid, social graph, speech recognition, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Steven Levy, Tesla Model S, Tim Cook: Apple, ubercab, urban planning, Zipcar

Both Ming and her partner are big data experts. When their son, Felix, showed symptoms of child-onset diabetes, they did what they knew best: They started collecting every bit of data they could on Felix’s eating, exercise and behavior. The two also researched the most advanced technology for managing the disease. They opted for a wireless OmniPod Insulin Pump that would work with a wireless Dexcom G4 Platinum continuous glucose monitoring system. The system, says Ming, is ten times more precise than a standard measuring and dosing system—it automatically adjusts to changes in blood sugar levels. They also purchased a Basis watch, which they strapped around Felix’s ankle. (His wrists were too small.) That provided them with even more data. When the time came, they gathered up their small data mountain and went to the endocrinologist’s office.


pages: 169 words: 56,250

Startup Communities: Building an Entrepreneurial Ecosystem in Your City by Brad Feld

barriers to entry, cleantech, cloud computing, corporate social responsibility, G4S, Grace Hopper, job satisfaction, Kickstarter, Lean Startup, minimum viable product, Network effects, paypal mafia, Peter Thiel, place-making, pre–internet, Richard Florida, Ruby on Rails, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, smart cities, software as a service, Steve Jobs, text mining, Y Combinator, zero-sum game, Zipcar

I was blown away by the idea and started my campaign to move Iceland toward a startup culture, what I now call Startup Iceland. Startup Iceland’s mission is to build a sustainable startup ecosystem. One piece in that ecosystem is a mentorship-driven accelerator. It took a lot of convincing to bring the two different incubators, a bank, and a bunch of mentors together. The result was Startup Reykjavik (http://startuprev.com/g4), an accelerator established in April 2012 that is part of the Global Accelerator Network. The next piece in the puzzle was to build bridges to big markets. The only way that I thought we could achieve this in scale was to do an annual conference focused on entrepreneurship, making the participation and presenters really relevant so entrepreneurs around the world could come to Iceland and meet the local startups.


Digital Transformation at Scale: Why the Strategy Is Delivery by Andrew Greenway,Ben Terrett,Mike Bracken,Tom Loosemore

Airbnb, bitcoin, blockchain, butterfly effect, call centre, chief data officer, choice architecture, cognitive dissonance, cryptocurrency, Diane Coyle, en.wikipedia.org, G4S, Internet of things, Kevin Kelly, Kickstarter, loose coupling, M-Pesa, minimum viable product, nudge unit, performance metric, ransomware, Silicon Valley, social web, the market place, The Wisdom of Crowds

In paying companies to design and deliver public services, governments then passed on the responsibility – and therefore the risk – to them. This is intellectually satisfying, and not necessarily wrong; outsourcing can work well, especially in the business world. For government, however, practice sometimes fails to follow the theory. As the public outcry over the behaviour of outsourcers shows – G4S’s provision of London 2012’s Olympic security and IBM’s spectacular 16,000% overspend on Queensland’s health department payroll services,34 to pick two examples – it doesn’t matter if a company contractually carries the can. The fallout still ultimately falls on the ministers. In recent months, the UK’s experience with the collapse of outsourcing firm Carillion has put the issue firmly back on the political agenda.


pages: 202 words: 62,901

The People's Republic of Walmart: How the World's Biggest Corporations Are Laying the Foundation for Socialism by Leigh Phillips, Michal Rozworski

Berlin Wall, Bernie Sanders, call centre, carbon footprint, central bank independence, Colonization of Mars, combinatorial explosion, complexity theory, computer age, corporate raider, decarbonisation, discovery of penicillin, Elon Musk, G4S, Georg Cantor, germ theory of disease, Gordon Gekko, greed is good, hiring and firing, index fund, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Internet of things, inventory management, invisible hand, Jeff Bezos, Joseph Schumpeter, linear programming, liquidity trap, mass immigration, Mont Pelerin Society, new economy, Norbert Wiener, oil shock, passive investing, Paul Samuelson, post scarcity, profit maximization, profit motive, purchasing power parity, recommendation engine, Ronald Coase, Ronald Reagan, sharing economy, Silicon Valley, Skype, sovereign wealth fund, strikebreaker, supply-chain management, technoutopianism, The Nature of the Firm, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, theory of mind, transaction costs, Turing machine, union organizing

In most jurisdictions, the electricity systems that were once in public hands have long since been privatized; therefore governments committed to efforts to decarbonize electricity companies have had little choice but to employ market mechanisms such as emissions trading or carbon taxation, rather than reducing greenhouse gas emissions via democratic fiat—that is, simply ordering the electricity provider to switch to non-emitting fuel sources. Almost everywhere, transportation, communication, education, prisons, policing and even emergency services are being spun off wholly or in part from the public sector and provided instead by market actors. Only the armed forces remain a state monopoly, and here only up to a point, given the rise of private security multinationals such as the notorious G4S and Blackwater (rebranded as Academi since 2011). The handful of social democratic and liberal parties that still defend public healthcare and public education do so while making vague assertions that “government has a role to play” or that “government can be a force for good.” But they don’t really say why; and in any case, this is making a case more for the state, rather than for planning per se, even though “the state” and “planning” are far from synonymous.


pages: 205 words: 20,452

Data Mining in Time Series Databases by Mark Last, Abraham Kandel, Horst Bunke

call centre, computer vision, discrete time, G4S, information retrieval, iterative process, NP-complete, p-value, pattern recognition, random walk, sensor fusion, speech recognition, web application

Let graph Ĝ = (V̂ , Ê, ŵE ) be defined as follows: V̂ = {u|u ∈ V ∧ C(u) > n/2}, Ê = {(u, v)|u, v ∈ V̂ }, Gi ŵE (u, v) = median{wE (u, v)|i = 1, . . . , n}. i Then it can be proven that graph Ĝ is a median of sequence S under d2 [33]. G1: G2: 0 Fig. 1. 1 2 1 2 Two graphs (G1 , G2 ). 3 Classification and Detection of Abnormal Events in Time Series of Graphs G1 : 0 1 2 G2 : 0 1 2 G3 : 1 2 G4 : 1 2 3 3 G5 : 0 1 2 3 G6 : 0 1 2 3 G7 : 0 1 2 3 G8 : 0 1 2 1 2 G9 : Fig. 2. 137 3 All possible medians of the sequence (G1 , G2 ) from Fig. 1. Comparing the median graph construction procedure for d1 with the one for d2 , we notice that the former is a special case of the latter, constraining edge weights to assume only binary values. Edge weight zero (or one) indicates the absence (or presence) of an edge.


pages: 288 words: 76,343

The Plundered Planet: Why We Must--And How We Can--Manage Nature for Global Prosperity by Paul Collier

agricultural Revolution, Berlin Wall, business climate, Doha Development Round, energy security, food miles, G4S, information asymmetry, Kenneth Arrow, megacity, new economy, offshore financial centre, oil shock, profit maximization, rent-seeking, Ronald Coase, Scramble for Africa, sovereign wealth fund, stem cell, Stewart Brand

To date Europe has led the world on the issue of carbon emissions and it will not want to fall behind China and the United States. Further, much of the climate change agenda can be handled at the level of the European Union rather than in each of the 27 member countries. In aggregate the EU is a very large economy, far too large to regard itself as having the potential to free-ride. Similarly, Japan is a large economy and has a long record of behaving as a responsible global citizen. So far we have the G4—the United States, China, the EU, and Japan—with incentives to behave responsibly. In view of its enormous size I will add India to this group of the responsible nations; it, too, is simply too large to free-ride. To date Indian governments have been a little reluctant to step up to the responsibility implied by their country’s size, but they will likely come to terms with its global role and responsibilities.


pages: 222 words: 76,854

Art of Learning by Josh Waitzkin

fear of failure, G4S, Mahatma Gandhi, pattern recognition, South China Sea

That evening, after a long day of eye-opening sessions with Dave, Jim Loehr, and Jack Groppel, I sat down with my laptop and chess notebooks and spent a few hours looking over my previous year of competitions. During chess tournaments, players notate their games as they go along. The chessboard is seen as a grid, with vertical ranks running a–h from left to right, and the horizontal files running 1–8, up from white’s perspective. After each move, a chess player will write down, for example, Bg4 or Qh5, meaning Bishop moves to g4 or Queen moves to h5. Usually notation is kept on a sheet with a carbon copy beneath, which allows public and private records of all chess games to be saved. For a number of years, when notating my games, I had also written down how long I thought on each move. This had the purpose of helping me manage my time usage, but after my first session with Dave, it also led to the discovery of a very interesting pattern.


pages: 280 words: 74,559

Fully Automated Luxury Communism by Aaron Bastani

"Robert Solow", autonomous vehicles, banking crisis, basic income, Berlin Wall, Bernie Sanders, Bretton Woods, capital controls, cashless society, central bank independence, collapse of Lehman Brothers, computer age, computer vision, David Ricardo: comparative advantage, decarbonisation, dematerialisation, Donald Trump, double helix, Elon Musk, energy transition, Erik Brynjolfsson, financial independence, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, future of work, G4S, housing crisis, income inequality, industrial robot, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Internet of things, Isaac Newton, James Watt: steam engine, Jeff Bezos, job automation, John Markoff, John Maynard Keynes: technological unemployment, Joseph Schumpeter, Kevin Kelly, Kuiper Belt, land reform, liberal capitalism, low earth orbit, low skilled workers, M-Pesa, market fundamentalism, means of production, mobile money, more computing power than Apollo, new economy, off grid, pattern recognition, Peter H. Diamandis: Planetary Resources, post scarcity, post-work, price mechanism, price stability, private space industry, Productivity paradox, profit motive, race to the bottom, RFID, rising living standards, Second Machine Age, self-driving car, sensor fusion, shareholder value, Silicon Valley, Simon Kuznets, Slavoj Žižek, stem cell, Stewart Brand, technoutopianism, the built environment, the scientific method, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thomas Malthus, transatlantic slave trade, Travis Kalanick, universal basic income, V2 rocket, Watson beat the top human players on Jeopardy!, Whole Earth Catalog, working-age population

How else can you explain the rationale behind a company funded by government contracts that, when it collapses, punishes workers and rewards the casino economy of financial speculation? Carillion’s economic function, particularly after 2010, would have failed to make sense in any other era. With the imposition of austerity, however, it had a vital role to play as it – along with similar companies such as Serco, Sodexo, Capita and G4S – distributed downward pressure on wages while Britain became the world’s second-largest outsourcing market. With the imperative being to push through public sector cuts, particularly in local government, while demonstrating the superiority of the private sector, these companies played a critical role in transferring hundreds of thousands of jobs while paying workers less. Indeed, Britain’s private sector employment ‘miracle’ subsequent to 2010 was possible only because of outsourcing.


Beyond Bigger Leaner Stronger: The Advanced Guide to Building Muscle, Staying Lean, and Getting Strong by Michael Matthews

agricultural Revolution, fear of failure, G4S, Gary Taubes, meta analysis, meta-analysis, phenotype, placebo effect, randomized controlled trial

International Journal of Sport Nutrition 10, no. 1 (2000): 28-38. 193. Soeters, Maarten R., Nicolette M. Lammers, Peter F. Dubbelhuis, Mariëtte Ackermans, Cora F. Jonkers-Schuitema, Eric Fliers, Hans P. Sauerwein, Johannes M. Aerts, and Mireille J. Serlie. “Intermittent fasting does not affect whole-body glucose, lipid, or protein metabolism.” The American journal of clinical nutrition 90, no. 5 (2009): 1244-1251. 194. http://www.acnp.org/g4/gn401000064/ch064.html 195. Cahill Jr, Geprge F. “Starvation in man.” The New England journal of medicine 282, no. 12 (1970): 668- 196. Bilsborough, Shane, and Neil Mann. “A review of issues of dietary protein intake in humans.” International journal of sport nutrition and exercise metabolism 16, no. 2 (2006): 129. 197. Nair, K. S., P. D. Woolf, S. L. Welle, and D. E. Matthews. “Leucine, glucose, and energy metabolism after 3 days of fasting in healthy human subjects.”


pages: 317 words: 84,400

Automate This: How Algorithms Came to Rule Our World by Christopher Steiner

23andMe, Ada Lovelace, airport security, Al Roth, algorithmic trading, backtesting, big-box store, Black-Scholes formula, call centre, cloud computing, collateralized debt obligation, commoditize, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, delta neutral, Donald Trump, Douglas Hofstadter, dumpster diving, Flash crash, G4S, Gödel, Escher, Bach, High speed trading, Howard Rheingold, index fund, Isaac Newton, John Markoff, John Maynard Keynes: technological unemployment, knowledge economy, late fees, Marc Andreessen, Mark Zuckerberg, market bubble, medical residency, money market fund, Myron Scholes, Narrative Science, PageRank, pattern recognition, Paul Graham, Pierre-Simon Laplace, prediction markets, quantitative hedge fund, Renaissance Technologies, ride hailing / ride sharing, risk tolerance, Robert Mercer, Sergey Aleynikov, side project, Silicon Valley, Skype, speech recognition, Spread Networks laid a new fibre optics cable between New York and Chicago, transaction costs, upwardly mobile, Watson beat the top human players on Jeopardy!, Y Combinator

This was a higher note, so a piano’s strings would explain the notes in triplicate and the lack of an F4. Brown now knew that the chord included George Martin, who, as he often did in other Beatles’ songs of that era, doubled on the piano while the band stuck to its core instruments. Brown’s algorithmic analysis turned up the real notes that Harrison had played on his Rickenbacker: A2, A3, D3, D4, G3, G4, C4, C4. This collection in no way resembles any of the sheet music floating about the world, which we now know was erroneously instructing people how to play this most classic of chords. Lennon hit a loud C5 on his six-string and Martin played D3, F3, D5, G5, E6 on the piano. With that knowledge, Harrison’s 2001 Web chat remark becomes all the more clearer: “It is F with a G on top (on the 12-string) . . . but you’ll have to ask Paul about the bass note to get the proper story.”


pages: 444 words: 84,486

Radicalized by Cory Doctorow

activist fund / activist shareholder / activist investor, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Bernie Sanders, call centre, crowdsourcing, cryptocurrency, Edward Snowden, Flash crash, G4S, high net worth, information asymmetry, license plate recognition, obamacare, old-boy network, six sigma, TaskRabbit

He’d talk your ear off about the clever ways he’d found to hide the loot: in hidden pouches in clothes for him and his family, in hidden panels in his car, in a hidden floor safe in his basement, behind the firebrick in the walk-in fireplace in his great room. Word got around, and two of the guards fritzed the cameras on his door, knocked at it like it was a routine callout, and then bulled their way in, tied him and his kids up, and got all of it. More than ten million dollars in anonymous, convertible wealth. The guards disappeared off the face of the earth, and G4S, who supplied them, brought in heavy lawyers and insurance underwriters and PIs who started hinting heavily that Patel was in on the robbery. It was ugly. It got worse when Patel blew his brains out. He was heavily leveraged and had just lost his life’s savings. To be honest, Martin was surprised he didn’t take his wife and kids with him. It was the sight of them, the next day, their faces blank masks as they drove into Patel’s gate toward his house and garage, that spooked Martin so that he made the call, firing off a mass text to The Thirty and then autopiloting through the routine to get his go-bags and other gear (including the Rothschilds in their portable life-support machines) into his armored Toyota Tacoma with its overcab cargo pod, camouflaged to look like a camping accessory, but actually as armored-up as the Tacoma’s body and windshields, with spare gas, tires, guns, ammo, food—even a chainsaw.


pages: 310 words: 92,880

Blood, Sweat, and Tea: Real-Life Adventures in an Inner-City Ambulance by Tom Reynolds

G4S, slashdot

Workload Once again I know a lot of visitors here are from America, so I’m going to explain how the LAS works on a day-to-day basis. This will either be very boring or immensely interesting–your choice. Ambulances run out of dedicated stations, we don’t share stations with the Fire Service. In fact, some years ago, when it was suggested the idea was shot down as we would be disturbing the firecrews’ sleep throughout the night. Each station has it’s own call-sign ‘Kl’, ‘J2’, ‘G4’ for example, then each ambo has a suffix that is attached to this, so one ambulance running out of station J2 would be called J201, while another would be J207. The stations are spaced approximately 5-6 miles apart, and you mainly service the area surrounding the station; however, with interhospital transfers and other irregularities you can quite easily find yourself across the other side of London.


pages: 280 words: 85,091

The Wisdom of Psychopaths: What Saints, Spies, and Serial Killers Can Teach Us About Success by Kevin Dutton

Asperger Syndrome, Bernie Madoff, business climate, corporate governance, corporate social responsibility, delayed gratification, epigenetics, Fellow of the Royal Society, G4S, impulse control, iterative process, John Nash: game theory, meta analysis, meta-analysis, Nicholas Carr, Norman Mailer, place-making, RAND corporation, Ronald Reagan, Steve Jobs, Steven Pinker, theory of mind, ultimatum game

He would, as the technology writer Walt Mossberg revealed, even at private viewings, drape a cloth over a product—some pristine new creation on a shiny boardroom table—and uncover it with a flourish. Apple isn’t the world’s greatest techno-innovator. Nowhere near it, in fact. Rather, it excels at rehashing other people’s ideas. It wasn’t the first outfit to introduce a personal computer (IBM). Nor was it the first to introduce a smartphone (Nokia). Indeed, when it has gone down the innovation road, it’s often screwed up. Anyone remember the Newton or the Power Mac G4 Cube? But what Jobs did bring to the table was style. Sophistication. And timeless, technological charm. He rolled out the red carpet for consumers, from living rooms, offices, design studios, film sets—you name it—right to the doors of Apple stores the world over. Mental Toughness Apple’s setbacks along the road to world domination (indeed, they were on the verge of going down the drain in the early days) serve as a cogent reminder of the pitfalls and stumbling blocks that await all of us in life.


pages: 561 words: 87,892

Losing Control: The Emerging Threats to Western Prosperity by Stephen D. King

Admiral Zheng, asset-backed security, barriers to entry, Berlin Wall, Bernie Madoff, Bretton Woods, BRICs, British Empire, business cycle, capital controls, Celtic Tiger, central bank independence, collateralized debt obligation, corporate governance, credit crunch, crony capitalism, currency manipulation / currency intervention, currency peg, David Ricardo: comparative advantage, demographic dividend, demographic transition, Deng Xiaoping, Diane Coyle, Fall of the Berlin Wall, financial deregulation, financial innovation, fixed income, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, full employment, G4S, George Akerlof, German hyperinflation, Gini coefficient, hiring and firing, income inequality, income per capita, inflation targeting, invisible hand, Isaac Newton, knowledge economy, labour market flexibility, labour mobility, liberal capitalism, low skilled workers, market clearing, Martin Wolf, mass immigration, Mexican peso crisis / tequila crisis, Naomi Klein, new economy, old age dependency ratio, Paul Samuelson, Ponzi scheme, price mechanism, price stability, purchasing power parity, rent-seeking, reserve currency, rising living standards, Ronald Reagan, savings glut, Silicon Valley, Simon Kuznets, sovereign wealth fund, spice trade, statistical model, technology bubble, The Great Moderation, The inhabitant of London could order by telephone, sipping his morning tea in bed, the various products of the whole earth, The Market for Lemons, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thomas Malthus, trade route, transaction costs, Washington Consensus, women in the workforce, working-age population, Y2K, Yom Kippur War

The US current account of the balance of payments offers the same mix, but the deficit on trade completely swamps the surpluses elsewhere. 13. Source: OECD Economic Outlook, June 2009. 14. The G20 includes the G8 members – the US, Japan, Germany, France, the UK, Italy, Canada and Russia – alongside Argentina, Australia, Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Mexico, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, South Korea and Turkey and the European Union as a whole. At the time of writing, pressure was mounting for the creation of a G4 including the US, the Eurozone, China and Japan, thereby leaving out in the cold the UK, Russia, Canada, Brazil and India, amongst others. 15. T. Fleming, The Louisiana Purchase (John Wiley & Sons, New Jersey, 2003). CHAPTER 3: THE PLEASURES AND PERILS OF TRADE 1. Audi’s UK strapline, ‘Vorsprung durch Technik’, literally means ‘Advancement through technology’. 2. In the words of the Volkswagen Corporate History Department, ‘As far as we can say, there was no official possibility to sell or buy an Audi Quattro in the former GDR before the opening of the Berlin Wall in 1989.


pages: 255 words: 92,719

All Day Long: A Portrait of Britain at Work by Joanna Biggs

Anton Chekhov, bank run, banking crisis, call centre, Chelsea Manning, credit crunch, David Graeber, Desert Island Discs, Downton Abbey, Erik Brynjolfsson, financial independence, future of work, G4S, glass ceiling, industrial robot, job automation, land reform, low skilled workers, mittelstand, Northern Rock, payday loans, Right to Buy, Second Machine Age, six sigma, Steve Jobs, trickle-down economics, unpaid internship, wages for housework, Wall-E

The jury had already been out for several days. Southwark Crown Court is a huge brown brick cube on the south bank of the Thames, punched with small brown square windows: inside, there is lino, glass reinforced by wire mesh and dark wood. In Court Two the judge sits below a coat of arms with barristers in front of him and a jury to his left. The accused sit behind the lawyers, in a glass box guarded by G4S contractors. You can hear them before they arrive, as doors slam and keys clink. The clerk is flipping between his court list and a crossword. Last to enter is the jury: one member has faux daisies pinned into her hair; another turns and looks at the defendants for the entire time she’s in court. The judge asks the foreman to stand up and give us his verdict. The barristers put their pink-ribboned bundles of paper and their iPads aside.


pages: 487 words: 95,085

JPod by Douglas Coupland

Asperger Syndrome, Drosophila, finite state, G4S, game design, Maui Hawaii, McMansion, neurotypical, pez dispenser, pre–internet, QWERTY keyboard, Ronald Reagan, special economic zone, wage slave, Y2K

—"hard to explain." "You look like Elizabeth Smart's kidnappers." Her phone rang and I went off in search of more 3-D clip art cas-des. By three-thirty I was able to squeak out of the building on the pretext of buying Honey Nut Cheerios. Mom was in the kitchen, drinking tea and reading the Province. "Hello, dear. You're wearing... rags." "It's the new look." We went into Dad's den, where Mom had a G4 all set to go. The spreadsheet problem seemed easy to fix. "I think you just have some fields crossed. Which part is giving you the biggest problem?" "I'm trying to track THC counts, along with the genetic ancestry of the plants." "I see what it is—genetics are logarithmic, whereas potency counts aren't." "I'm glad someone here understands it. I'll go get you a nice big piece of double-frosted chocolate devil's food cake."


pages: 329 words: 106,831

All Your Base Are Belong to Us: How Fifty Years of Video Games Conquered Pop Culture by Harold Goldberg

activist lawyer, Alexey Pajitnov wrote Tetris, Apple II, cellular automata, Columbine, Conway's Game of Life, G4S, game design, In Cold Blood by Truman Capote, Mars Rover, Mikhail Gorbachev, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Ray Oldenburg, Saturday Night Live, Silicon Valley, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, The Great Good Place, Thorstein Veblen, urban planning

But games that are artful from start to finish are few and far between because, as in the mainstream comics world, game makers are often mired in arrested development. It’s difficult to find an M-rated game (for those over seventeen only) without giant-titted, Frank Frazetta–like women drawn by artists who spend months working on applications to make breasts wiggle as they do in real life. Bloggers and even G4 TV’s witty “X-Play” have compiled long stories on the history of breast physics in videogames. A handful of underground artists have indeed used games to espouse their popular art on a higher plane. Artist Mary Flanagan reprogrammed the software from Unreal Tournament 2003 to make Domestic, a memoirlike tale of her father being trapped in the family’s house during a fire. Anne-Marie Schleiner and her band of rebel artists invaded the violent Counter-Strike online shooter with a Velvet-Strike application, adding peace symbols and the phrase “Make Love, Not War” to the virtual walls in the game (she often was shot and killed before completing a graffito).


pages: 300 words: 106,520

The Nanny State Made Me: A Story of Britain and How to Save It by Stuart Maconie

banking crisis, basic income, Bernie Sanders, bitcoin, Boris Johnson, British Empire, cognitive dissonance, collective bargaining, Corn Laws, David Attenborough, Desert Island Discs, don't be evil, Downton Abbey, Elon Musk, Etonian, failed state, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, full employment, G4S, Gordon Gekko, greed is good, helicopter parent, hiring and firing, housing crisis, job automation, Mark Zuckerberg, market fundamentalism, Marshall McLuhan, North Sea oil, Own Your Own Home, plutocrats, Plutocrats, rent control, Right to Buy, road to serfdom, Silicon Valley, The Chicago School, universal basic income, Winter of Discontent

As Will Hutton has written, ‘It is not just that this represents a general fall in trust in business. The privatised utilities are felt to be in a different category: they are public services. But there is a widespread view that demanding profit targets have overridden public service obligations. And the public is right.’ In August 2018, the government had to step in to take control of Birmingham’s Winson Green prison from the private company G4S after inspectors found it in ‘an appalling state’ with widespread violence, drug use and negligible discipline or control exercised by terrified staff. This state of affairs culminated in riots. Humiliatingly for the privateers, it had been the first prison to be given over to the private sector in 2011. Some of the rebellious inmates may well have been sent there on evidence that passed through the labs of the private forensics company Randox.


pages: 764 words: 261,694

The Elements of Statistical Learning (Springer Series in Statistics) by Trevor Hastie, Robert Tibshirani, Jerome Friedman

Bayesian statistics, bioinformatics, computer age, conceptual framework, correlation coefficient, G4S, greed is good, linear programming, p-value, pattern recognition, random walk, selection bias, speech recognition, statistical model, stochastic process, The Wisdom of Crowds

In this case optimal scoring is equivalent to a canonical correlation problem, and the solution can be computed by a single eigen-decomposition. This is pursued in Exercise 12.6, and the resulting algorithm is presented here. We create an N × K indicator response matrix Y from the responses gi , such that yik = 1 if gi = k, otherwise yik = 0. For a five-class problem Y might look like the following: 12.5 Flexible Discriminant Analysis g1 = 2 g2 = 1 g3 = 1 g4 = 5 g5 = 4 .. . gN = 3 C1 0  1   1   0   0     0 C2 1 0 0 0 0 0 C3 0 0 0 0 0 .. . 1 C4 0 0 0 0 1 0 445 C5  0 0   0   1   0     0 Here are the computational steps: 1. Multivariate nonparametric regression. Fit a multiresponse, adaptive nonparametric regression of Y on X, giving fitted values Ŷ. Let Sλ be the linear operator that fits the final chosen model, and η ∗ (x) be the vector of fitted regression functions. 2.

One would expect, in addition to an increase in the number of “classes,” a similar increase in the number of “observations” in the kth class by a factor of Rk . It turns out that this is not the case if linear operators are used for the optimal scoring regression. The enlarged indicator Y matrix collapses in this case to a blurred response matrix Z, which is intuitively pleasing. For example, suppose there are K = 3 classes, and Rk = 3 subclasses per class. Then Z might be 12.7 Mixture Discriminant Analysis g1 g2 g3 g4 g5 .. . gN c11 0  0.9   0.1   0   0    =3 0 =2 =1 =1 =3 =2  c12 0 0.1 0.8 0 0 c13 0 0.0 0.1 0 0 c21 0.3 0 0 0 0.7 .. . c22 0.5 0 0 0 0.1 c23 0.2 0 0 0 0.2 c31 0 0 0 0.5 0 c32 0 0 0 0.4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.1 0.1 c33  0 0   0   0.1  , 0     0.8 451 (12.63) where the entries in a class-k row correspond to W (ckr |x, gi ). The remaining steps are the same:  Ẑ = SZ  M-step of MDA.


Lonely Planet Best of Spain by Lonely Planet

augmented reality, bike sharing scheme, centre right, discovery of the americas, Frank Gehry, G4S, Guggenheim Bilbao, haute cuisine, illegal immigration, market design, place-making, trade route, young professional

Central Barcelona 1 Sights 1 Antic Hospital de la Santa Creu A5 2 Basílica de Santa Maria del Mar G3 3 Domus de Sant Honorat D4 4 Gran Teatre del Liceu C5 5 La Capella A5 6 La Catedral D3 7 La Rambla C5 8 Mercat de la Boqueria B4 9 Mercat de Santa Caterina F1 10 Mosaïc de Miró C5 11 Museu d’Història de Barcelona E3 12 Museu Frederic Marès E3 13 Museu Picasso G2 14 Palau Güell C6 15 Plaça del Rei E3 16 Plaça Reial D5 2 Activities, Courses & Tours 17 Runner Bean Tours A4 7 Shopping Cereria Subirà (see 11) 18 El Rei de la Màgia F2 19 Herboristeria del Rei D5 20 Vila Viniteca G4 5 Eating 21 Bar Pinotxo B4 22 Bormuth H2 23 Cafè de l’Acadèmia F4 24 Cal Pep H3 25 Casa Delfín H2 26 El Atril F1 27 Els Quatre Gats C2 28 La Vinateria del Call D4 29 Xurreria D4 6 Drinking & Nightlife 30 Boadas A2 31 Caelum C3 32 Cafè de l’Òpera C5 33 Can Paixano H4 34 El Born Bar H3 35 Ginger F4 36 Guzzo H2 37 Juanra Falces H2 38 La Cerveteca F4 39 La Vinya del Senyor G3 40 L’Ascensor E4 41 Mudanzas H3 42 Ocaña D6 43 Rubí G3 44 Salterio D4 45 Sor Rita G5 3 Entertainment 46 Gran Teatre del Liceu C5 47 Sala Tarantos D6 1 Sights 1 La Rambla & Barri Gòtic La Rambla, Barcelona’s most famous pedestrian strip, is always a hive of activity, with buskers, peddlers, tourists and con artists (watch out!)


pages: 387 words: 119,244

Making It Happen: Fred Goodwin, RBS and the Men Who Blew Up the British Economy by Iain Martin

asset-backed security, bank run, Basel III, beat the dealer, Big bang: deregulation of the City of London, call centre, central bank independence, computer age, corporate governance, corporate social responsibility, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, deindustrialization, deskilling, Edward Thorp, Etonian, Eugene Fama: efficient market hypothesis, eurozone crisis, falling living standards, financial deregulation, financial innovation, G4S, high net worth, interest rate swap, invisible hand, joint-stock company, Kickstarter, light touch regulation, London Whale, Long Term Capital Management, moral hazard, negative equity, Neil Kinnock, Nick Leeson, North Sea oil, Northern Rock, old-boy network, pets.com, Red Clydeside, shareholder value, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, too big to fail, upwardly mobile, value at risk

Archie Hunter is retired, as is Bill Friedrich, the American lawyer. Another American non-executive, Charles ‘Bud’ Koch, the former boss of Charter One, has stepped back from finance. Colin Buchan stood down from the RBS board in 2011. Investment banker Joe MacHale left the RBS board in May 2013, the last of the group who were there in 2008. John Connolly, the former boss of Deloitte, RBS’s auditor, stepped down and became chairman of G4S just in time for the security group’s difficulties over its failure to hire sufficient numbers of staff to fulfill its contracts for the London Olympics. Victor Hong, the risk manager man who actually resigned from Greenwich on a point of principle, disputing the marking of CDOs, is now a consultant on risk management and regulation. Jay Levine became an investor in a firm headed by his former colleague, Ben Carpenter, which they hoped would become ‘the new Greenwich’, although it was a struggle to get such ventures off the ground after the financial crisis.


pages: 755 words: 121,290

Statistics hacks by Bruce Frey

Bayesian statistics, Berlin Wall, correlation coefficient, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, distributed generation, en.wikipedia.org, feminist movement, G4S, game design, Hacker Ethic, index card, Milgram experiment, p-value, place-making, reshoring, RFID, Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, SETI@home, Silicon Valley, statistical model, Thomas Bayes

Another intuitive explanation is that there are more small towns than large cities, and there are more short rivers than long rivers. Where It Doesn't Work Benford's law is less likely to apply in data sets with insufficient variability or data sets that are nonrandomly selected. For example, computer files sizes approximately follow Benford's law, but only if no restriction is placed on the type of files selected. To illustrate this, I found the frequencies of the first digit of the file sizes on an Apple PowerBook G4. The results shown in Figure 6-3 and Table 6-11 exhibit the Benford's law pattern. Figure 6-3. Computer files that follow Benford's law Table Computer files that approximately follow Benford's law First nonzero digitRelative frequency for first digit of 660,172 computer filesProbability according to Benford's law 1 0.277 0.301 2 0.181 0.176 3 0.144 0.125 4 0.107 0.097 5 0.076 0.079 6 0.067 0.067 7 0.054 0.058 8 0.054 0.051 9 0.041 0.046 Although the results shown in Figure 6-3 and Table 6-11 are based on 660,172 files, Table 6-12 demonstrates that a sample size of 600 is large enough to exhibit the Benford's law pattern (albeit not as well as the larger sample), provided the sample of files is random.


pages: 421 words: 120,332

The World in 2050: Four Forces Shaping Civilization's Northern Future by Laurence C. Smith

Bretton Woods, BRICs, business cycle, clean water, Climategate, colonial rule, deglobalization, demographic transition, Deng Xiaoping, energy security, flex fuel, G4S, global supply chain, Google Earth, guest worker program, Hans Island, hydrogen economy, ice-free Arctic, informal economy, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), invention of agriculture, invisible hand, land tenure, Martin Wolf, megacity, Mikhail Gorbachev, New Urbanism, oil shale / tar sands, oil shock, peak oil, Pearl River Delta, purchasing power parity, Ronald Reagan, Ronald Reagan: Tear down this wall, side project, Silicon Valley, smart grid, sovereign wealth fund, special economic zone, standardized shipping container, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thomas Malthus, trade liberalization, trade route, UNCLOS, UNCLOS, urban planning, Washington Consensus, Y2K

Sauchyn, “Increasing Winter Base-flow and Mean Annual Streamflow from Possible Permafrost Thawing in the Northwest Territories, Canada,” Geophysical Research Letters 36 (2009): L01401. An excellent recent synopsis is A. K. Rennermalm, E. F. Wood, T. J. Troy, “Observed Changes of Pan-Arctic Cold-Season Minimum Monthly River Discharge,” Climate Dynamics, DOI: 10.888/1748-9326 /4/2/024011. 286 L. C. Smith et al., “Rising Minimum Daily Flows in Northern Eurasian Rivers: A Growing Influence of Groundwater in the High-Latitude Hydrologic Cycle,” Journal of Geophysical Research 112, G4, (2007): G04S47. 287 Ice caps are large glacier masses on land. Unlike Antarctica, a continent buried beneath mile-thick glaciers and surrounded by oceans, the Arctic is an ocean surrounded by continents. It is thinly covered with just one to two meters of seasonally frozen ocean water called “sea ice.” 288 The Fall Meeting of the American Geophysical Union, which convenes each December in San Francisco, California. 289 The Arctic Ocean freezes over completely in winter but partially opens in summer.


pages: 419 words: 119,476

Posh Boys: How English Public Schools Ruin Britain by Robert Verkaik

accounting loophole / creative accounting, Alistair Cooke, banking crisis, Berlin Wall, Boris Johnson, British Empire, Brixton riot, Dominic Cummings, Donald Trump, Etonian, G4S, gender pay gap, God and Mammon, income inequality, Khartoum Gordon, Kickstarter, knowledge economy, Livingstone, I presume, loadsamoney, mega-rich, Neil Kinnock, offshore financial centre, old-boy network, place-making, plutocrats, Plutocrats, Robert Gordon, Robert Mercer, school vouchers, The Bell Curve by Richard Herrnstein and Charles Murray, trade route, traveling salesman, unpaid internship

Why shouldn’t the state change the character of non-state schools? Should the human-rights bar prove insurmountable perhaps we should consider turning all our schools into fee-paying private institutions, issuing the poorest pupils with school vouchers which they could spend at Eton, Harrow and Winchester or any school they chose. By sending everyone to public schools run by companies like Capita and G4, no one would unfairly benefit from a privileged education and the taxpayer would save tens of billions of pounds a year in funding primary and secondary schools. Privatising all schools would, at a stroke, neutralise the elitist appeal of the public school. After all, the reason why the rich and powerful patronise them with their business is partly because 93 per cent of the population can’t afford to.


pages: 1,744 words: 458,385

The Defence of the Realm by Christopher Andrew

active measures, anti-communist, Ayatollah Khomeini, Berlin Wall, British Empire, Clive Stafford Smith, collective bargaining, credit crunch, cuban missile crisis, Desert Island Discs, Etonian, Fall of the Berlin Wall, G4S, glass ceiling, illegal immigration, job satisfaction, large denomination, liquidationism / Banker’s doctrine / the Treasury view, Mahatma Gandhi, Mikhail Gorbachev, Neil Kinnock, North Sea oil, post-work, Red Clydeside, Robert Hanssen: Double agent, Ronald Reagan, sexual politics, strikebreaker, Torches of Freedom, traveling salesman, union organizing, uranium enrichment, Vladimir Vetrov: Farewell Dossier, Winter of Discontent

As a political refugee from Tsarist Russia in pre-war Britain, Klishko had been employed as a technical translator by the armaments firm Vickers, and had been suspected by Scotland Yard of arms smuggling to Russian revolutionaries.27 A Vickers manager reported at the time of the Bolshevik Revolution that Klishko was ‘very friendly with the notorious Lenin’ and had ‘the most extreme Leninite views’.28 The head of the Russian section (G4), Captain Maurice Bray, one of MI5’s Russian speakers (‘recreations: shooting and golf’), concluded in July 1918 that Klishko was the ‘most dangerous Bolshevik here’.29 He was interned in August and subsequently deported, before returning to London in May 1920 with the Russian Trade Delegation. Once back in London he was kept under inadequate surveillance. It was only in the later 1920s that MI5 discovered that he had taken part in setting up a spy-ring headed by the pro-Bolshevik foreign editor of the Daily Herald, William Norman Ewer.30 The Soviet intelligence which MI5 received from SIS in the early 1920s was of variable quality.31 In February 1921 the SIS head of station in the Estonian capital Reval (now Tallinn) reported that an agent codenamed ‘BP11’, ‘whose reliability has been proved on many occasions’, had successfully penetrated the Reval office of Maksim Litvinov, Soviet Deputy Commissar for Foreign Affairs, and gained access to its code department.

., pp. 377–94. 25 Freeman, ‘MI1(b) and the Origins of British Diplomatic Cryptanalysis’, pp. 217–18. The decrypts are in TNA HW 12/332; copies of many of them are in HLRO Lloyd George MSS. 26 Andrew, Secret Service, pp. 377, 384–8, 394. 27 H1 summary of reports on Klishko from 1 September 1915 to 9 September 1918, TNA KV 2/1411. 28 ‘Nicholas Klyshko’ [sic], 21 Feb. 1918, TNA KV 2/1410. 29 Report by M. W. Bray (G4), 11 July 1918, TNA KV 2/1411. Bray served in MI5 from May 1917 to January 1919; Security Service Archives. 30 ‘Clandestine Activities of William Norman Ewer 1919–1929’, September 1949, p. 1, TNA KV 2/1016, s. 1101a. 31 On SIS operations against Soviet Russia in the 1920s, see Jeffery, Official History of the Secret Intelligence Service, part II. 32 Andrew, Secret Service, pp. 398–400. 33 Note by A.

‘Bert’ 367, 368 Ewart, Sir John Spencer 10–11, 19, 20, 24, 29–30 Ewer, William Norman 145, 152–4, 156, 157–9 F Branch/Division 84, 236, 268, 281, 325, 551, 558, 561, 600, 622–3, 647, 648–9, 681, 683, 745; F1 408, 611, 664; FIA 332, 527–8, 529, 530, 660, 664, 673; FIB 604; FIC 332, 668; F2 561, 656; F2A 274, 278; F2C 277, 332, 561; F3 611, 615, 684; F4 402, 408, 498; F5 619, 622, 684, 700, 740–41; F8 700; see also Appendix 3 Falber, Reuben 386, 418 Falklands conflict (1982) 697, 755, 757 ‘false flag’ technique 167, 583 Farrell, Maire´ad 739, 740, 741–3, 744–5 Fascism: Italy 105, 124, 191, 193, 197; internment of British Fascists 192, 194, 227, 230–31, 235; Spain 259, 260; and labour unrest 595; see also British Union of Fascists Faux, Julian 607, 613, 619, 751 FBI (US Federal Bureau of Investigation): pre-war 210; and VENONA project 366, 372–3, 377; and atom spies 386–7, 389, 390; involvement in investigations into alleged Soviet penetration of security services 509, 514; Irish Republican investigations 697, 749–50; categorization of double agents’ motives 713 Ferguson, Victor 94, 96, 99 ‘fifth column’ fears: wartime 223–4, 225, 227, 228, 229–30, 859–50; Cold War 400, 405 Findlay, Mansfeldt de Carbonnel 86, 89 ‘Finney, Jim’ (IIB agent) 123, 149, 152 First United States Army Group (FUSAG) 284, 299, 305, 309 First World War: outbreak 50, 53–4; spy mania 53–5, 81, 223; Western Front 55, 73, 91, 96, 98–9, 104, 105, 106, 108, 861; opposition to 66, 94–5, 99, 101–4, 106; battle of Jutland 72; naval operations 72, 463; sabotage operations 75, 77, 78–9, 852; Eastern Front 77, 98; conscription 94–5; Caporetto 104; Amiens 106; Armistice 106; demobilization 140; Holt-Wilson on 187 Fischer Williams, Jenifer (later Hart) 375, 538–9, 540 Fisher, Sir Warren 119, 120, 136–7, 203, 218–19, 227 FLAVIUS, Operation 739–45 Fletcher, Yvonne 701, 702 Floud, Bernard 538–41 FLUENCY (joint Security Service–SIS working party) 510–12, 515–18, 521, 634 Foot, Sir Hugh 464, 465 Foot, Michael 166, 418, 464, 578, 638, 663 FOOT, Operation (1971 expulsion of Soviet intelligence personnel) 565–7, 571–3, 574–5, 576, 579, 586, 732, 859 Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) 481, 552–3, 566, 701, 724 Foreign Office 25, 35, 119, 174–5, 207, 208–9, 244, 246, 263–5, 268, 279, 393–4, 407, 410, 421, 425, 495, 496–7, 533, 854 FORTITUDE, Operation 296–8, 299–300, 310, 855 Foulkes, Frank 410, 411, 529, 530 FOXHUNTER, Operation 463 France: Triple Entente 8; Franco-Prussian War (1870–71) 11, 12; pre-First World War German intelligence in 52, 66; liaison with British intelligence 71, 137, 185; First World War 80, 98–9, 101; post-First World War threat 117; French Communist Party (PCF) 161; Nazi occupation 205, 222, 223, 230, 298; Allied invasion 284, 296–7, 304–10; decolonization 442; Suez crisis 445, 473; reaction to FOOT 574–5; terrorist attacks in 691, 692; PIRA bases in 699, 772; Islamist terrorism 802; see also DST Franco, Francisco 260, 267 Frazer, John 409, 410 Freeman, John 410, 446, 529, 530 Frolik, Josef 535, 541–3, 707 Fryers, Robert ‘Rab’ 777, 784–5, 855 Fuchs, Klaus: investigation, interrogation and confession 334, 371, 385–6, 858, 853; conviction and imprisonment 345, 377, 386–7; and Gouzenko defection 346; identified through VENONA decrypts 375, 376, 377, 384–5; case causes crisis in Special Relationship 386–7, 390; run by female GRU controller 550, 580; links with Melita Norwood 580 Fulton Report (1968) 338 Furnival Jones, Sir Martin (‘FJ’): recruited to MI5 219; on Masterman 317–18; appointed DG (1965) 328; background and character 328, 332; introduction of new career structure 332; management style 338, 547; and Philby case 432, 435; stationing of SLOs in Africa 469, 471; and phasing out of SLOs 481; and Portland spy-ring 485, 486; and Blake case 489; and investigations of Mitchell and Hollis 506–7, 515, 516, 517–18, 520; and FLUENCY working party 511–12, 515; and Golitsyn and Angleton’s conspiracy theories 513, 515, 516; and Wigg 524–5; industrial subversion investigations 528, 529, 588, 590–91, 594–6; and D-Notice affair 531; advises Marcia Williams’s removal 533; and Callaghan 534–6; and Thorpe affair 534; review of protective security 537, 607; and Blake escape and defection 538; and Floud and Owen cases 539, 542; Heath’s dislike of 547, 587; retirement (1972) 547; appointment of successor 547–8; and FOOT 567, 574; and Arab terrorism 601–2; and Northern Ireland 602–3, 604, 607, 618 FX Branch 560, 647, 683, 700, 702, 734, 745–6 G Branch 84, 93, 94, 745–6, 772, 805, 818; G1 95–6, 97; G4 145; see also Appendix 3 Gaitskell, Hugh 412, 416, 418–19, 526, 847–8, 853 Gallacher, Willie 148, 166, 278, 381, 404 Gandhi, Indira 446, 736–7 Gannon, Donal 795–7 Garby-Czerniawski, Roman (double agent BRUTUS) 298–9, 300, 309, 312, 316 Gardiner, Gerald, Baron 410, 525 Gardner, Meredith 366, 376, 423, 431, 433–4 GCHQ (Government Communications Headquarters): collaboration with American A(F)SA 366, 372–3; VENONA project 366, 372, 378, 434; at Eastcote 428; Prime case 578–9, 712–13, 754, 756; counter-proliferation role 788 Gee, Ethel ‘Bunty’ 485, 487 General Strike (1926) 125–6 George V, King 146, 179 George VI, King 297, 310, 416, 856 German Communist Party (KPD) 188, 189–90 German embassy (London) 195–7, 199, 853 Germany, Imperial: pre-war espionage and invasion threat 3, 7–21, 30–52, 861; navy 8, 55, 64, 162; Meldewesen system 30; wartime espionage and sabotage attempts 66–80, 861–2; wartime subversion 86–7, 90–92, 94, 99–100, 101–3, 106–7, 852; Treaty of Brest-Litovsk (1918) 104; Treaty of Versailles (1919) 186, 195, 198, 852 Germany, Weimar 117, 186–8, 198, 852 Germany, Nazi: anti-Semitism 7, 189–90; Hitler’s rise 188–9; violence and repression 188–9, 190; concentration camps 189, 352, 364; rearmament 195; and Rhineland 198; annexation of Austria 200; threat to Czechoslovakia 200, 202, 207–8; pre-war espionage 210–11, 212–13; invasion of Poland 213; invasion of France and Low Countries 222, 223; planned invasion of Britain 230–31, 235, 250, 257–9, 858; invasion of Soviet Union 273, 292 Germany, post-war see East Germany; West Germany Ghana (formerly Gold Coast) 451–4, 468, 470–71, 859 Gibraltar: DSO 138, 220; Burgess goes wild in 422; attempted PIRA terrorist attack (1988) 739–45, 748 Glad, Tör (double agent JEFF) 292 Glading, Percy 137, 167, 179, 180–82, 183, 854 Gladstone, Hugh 62, 63, 64, 84 Glasgow 41, 139, 246, 254, 448, 653, 654; pub bombings (1979) 654; organized crime 790; terrorist attack on airport (2007) 836 GOLD, Operation 490 Goleniewski, Michal 484–5, 487, 488, 511 Golitsyn, Anatoli: intelligence on Cambridge Five 378, 435, 438, 439; defection 435, 503, 504; paranoia and exaggeration 439, 503, 504, 516; Vassall case 492; and Hollis and Mitchell 503–4, 507, 511, 512–13, 516, 518, 519; limitations of his evidence 503, 504; temporary move to Britain 504, 505, 506; and Sino-Soviet split 512–14; and CAZAB investigations 514–15 Gollan, John 402–3, 404, 410, 528, 592 Good Friday Agreement (1998) 782, 798 Gorbachev, Mikhail 680, 723, 725 Gordievsky, Oleg: posting to London 348, 708–12; identification of ELLI 348–9; on Pontecorvo 390; and identification of Fifth Man 440–41, 707–6; identification of Bob Edwards as KGB agent 527, 710–11, 711–12; on Jack Jones 536, 589, 657, 710–11; on KGB contacts with anti-nuclear movement 674–5; on funding of NUM 679; on Libyan terrorism 701; on Soviet fear of nuclear attack 709, 722–3, 861, 860; and Thatcher 709, 720, 725, 727, 730; succeeds Titov 710–11; and Hollis investigations 712; and Bettaney 714–18, 721; and Guk’s expulsion from London 724–5; appointed London resident designate 724–6; exposure and defection 726–7, 730; on Mikardo 758 Gordon Walker, Patrick 345, 412–13, 415, 416, 480, 526 Gorsky, Anatoli 184, 269, 272, 280 Gouzenko, Igor 282, 339–2, 343–49, 380, 431–2, 434 Government Code and Cypher School (GC&CS): SIS control of 120; decrypts of Soviet ciphers 143–4, 146, 147, 154–5, 175–7, 178, 261; and ARCOS affair 156; surveillance of employees 158; decrypts of German ciphers 248, 253, 254, 300, 305, 855; relocation to Bletchley Park 248; Churchill’s interest in 287, 856; and Palestine intercept station 353; see also GCHQ; ISOS; ULTRA Government War Book 194, 404, 406, 859 Grant, Ted 660, 661, 682 Graves, Karl 40–41, 42–4, 50, 70 Gray, Olga 179–82, 183, 220–21, 401, 854 Green, Oliver 277, 281 Greene, Sir Hugh 396 Greenhill, Sir Denis, 565, 571, 572 Gregory, Ivor (Soviet agent ACE) 579, 582–3, 585 Grey, Sir Edward 37, 86, 89 Grieve, John 796, 855 Grist, Evelyn 274, 334–5 Grivas, George 462–5 Gromyko, Andrei 553, 566, 567, 573 Grosse, Heinrich 39–40, 42 GRU (Soviet military intelligence): pre-war anti-Western imperialist operations 161; wartime espionage 280, 374, 378–9; Canadian spy-ring 339–41, 344–49; messages decrypted by VENONA 378; growth of London residency in 1960s 491, 565–7; mass expulsion of London personnel (Operation FOOT) 565, 567, 571–3, 574–5, 732, 859; Operation RYAN 709, 722–3, 861; expulsion of agents following Gordievsky defection 727, 730, 736; policy on visas for 732–3 Guantánamo Bay 825 Guk, Arkadi 710, 714–17, 718, 719, 723–5, 732 H Branch 84, 779–80; H2 section see Registry; see also Appendix 3 Haddad, Wadi 60, 601, 605, 607 Hague, The 80, 651; SIS mission 200–201, 212–13, 241–2, 244–5, 246 Hahn, John 67, 68 Hain, Peter 641–2, 942 Haines, Joe 629, 631, 633, 634 Haldane, Maldwyn Makgill 59, 60, 63 Haldane, Richard Burdon, 1st Viscount 14–15, 19–20, 39, 54, 59 Halifax, E.


pages: 931 words: 79,142

Concepts, Techniques, and Models of Computer Programming by Peter Van-Roy, Seif Haridi

computer age, Debian, discrete time, Donald Knuth, Eratosthenes, fault tolerance, G4S, general-purpose programming language, George Santayana, John von Neumann, Lao Tzu, Menlo Park, natural language processing, NP-complete, Paul Graham, premature optimization, sorting algorithm, Therac-25, Turing complete, Turing machine, type inference

In 1996, the German and Swedish labs were joined by the Department of Computing Science and Engineering at UCL when the first author moved there. Together the three laboratories formed the Mozart Consortium with its neutral Web site http://www.mozart-oz.org so that the work would not be tied down to a single institution. This book was written using LATEX 2ε , flex, xfig, xv, vi/vim, emacs, and Mozart, first on a Dell Latitude with Red Hat Linux and KDE, and then on an Apple Macintosh PowerBook G4 with Mac OS X and X11. The screenshots were taken on a Sun workstation running Solaris. The first author thanks the Walloon Region of Belgium for their generous support of the Oz/Mozart work at UCL in the PIRATES and MILOS projects. Final comments We have tried to make this book useful both as a textbook and as a reference. It is up to you to judge how well it succeeds in this. Because of its size, it is likely that some errors remain.

The function NewQueue returns a new queue Q, which is a record queue(put:PutProc get:GetProc) that contains two procedures, one for inserting an element in the queue and one for fetching an element from the queue. The queue is implemented with two ports. The use of dataflow variables makes the queue insensitive to the relative arrival order of Q.get and Q.put requests. For example, the Q.get requests 5. Using a prerelease of Mozart 1.3.0 on a PowerPC processor at 1 GHz (PowerBook G4 running Mac OS X), the rate is about 300000 asynchronous method calls per second. 380 Message-Passing Concurrency fun {NewQueue} Given GivePort={NewPort Given} Taken TakePort={NewPort Taken} in Given=Taken queue(put:proc {$ X} {Send GivePort X} end get:proc {$ X} {Send TakePort X} end) end Figure 5.17: Queue (naive version with ports). can arrive even when the queue is empty. To insert an element X, call {Q.put X}.


Canary Islands Travel Guide by Lonely Planet

AltaVista, call centre, carbon footprint, G4S, Haight Ashbury, haute cuisine, Kickstarter, low cost airline, low cost carrier, urban sprawl

A short walk away is the little Museo Arqueológico (Archaeological Museum; Calle Lomo 9; adult/under 6yr €1/free; 10am-1pm & 5-9pm Tue-Sat, 10am-1pm Sun, closed Aug), which provides an insight into the Guanche way of life with its replicas of a typical cave dwelling, as well as a burial cave where pots and baked-clay adornments share the same burial area, demonstrating the Guanches’ belief in an afterlife. The most interesting exhibit is a tiny clay idol – one of only a few ever found. Puerto de la Cruz Sights 1 Ayuntamiento F1 2 Casa de la Aduana E1 3 Casa Iriarte E2 4 Castillo de San Felipe A3 Ermita de San Juan (see 6) 5 Iglesia de Nuestra Señora de la Peña de Francia F2 6 Iglesia de San Francisco E2 7 Museo Arqueológico D2 8 Risco Belle Aquatic Gardens F4 9 Sitio Litre Garden G4 10 Torreon de Ventoso E3 Activities, Courses & Tours 11 El Cardumen B4 12 Mountain Bike Active C3 Sleeping 13 Hotel Monopol E2 14 Hotel Tigaiga D2 15 Pensión Los Geranios D2 Eating 16 El Limón F2 17 La Papaya D2 18 La Rosa di Bari C2 19 Meson Los Gemelos D3 20 Rancho Grande F2 21 Restaurante Mil Sabores D1 22 Restaurante Rustico F2 23 Tapas Arcón E3 Drinking 24 Colours Café D2 25 Ebano Café F2 Entertainment 26 Salsa Bar G2 Southeast of the museum is the lively Plaza Charco (Puddle Plaza), which acquired its name because it used to flood from the sea every time there was a heavy storm (thankfully, no more).


pages: 466 words: 127,728

The Death of Money: The Coming Collapse of the International Monetary System by James Rickards

Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Asian financial crisis, asset allocation, Ayatollah Khomeini, bank run, banking crisis, Ben Bernanke: helicopter money, bitcoin, Black Swan, Bretton Woods, BRICs, business climate, business cycle, buy and hold, capital controls, Carmen Reinhart, central bank independence, centre right, collateralized debt obligation, collective bargaining, complexity theory, computer age, credit crunch, currency peg, David Graeber, debt deflation, Deng Xiaoping, diversification, Edward Snowden, eurozone crisis, fiat currency, financial innovation, financial intermediation, financial repression, fixed income, Flash crash, floating exchange rates, forward guidance, G4S, George Akerlof, global reserve currency, global supply chain, Growth in a Time of Debt, income inequality, inflation targeting, information asymmetry, invisible hand, jitney, John Meriwether, Kenneth Rogoff, labor-force participation, Lao Tzu, liquidationism / Banker’s doctrine / the Treasury view, liquidity trap, Long Term Capital Management, mandelbrot fractal, margin call, market bubble, market clearing, market design, money market fund, money: store of value / unit of account / medium of exchange, mutually assured destruction, obamacare, offshore financial centre, oil shale / tar sands, open economy, plutocrats, Plutocrats, Ponzi scheme, price stability, quantitative easing, RAND corporation, reserve currency, risk-adjusted returns, Rod Stewart played at Stephen Schwarzman birthday party, Ronald Reagan, Satoshi Nakamoto, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, Skype, sovereign wealth fund, special drawing rights, Stuxnet, The Market for Lemons, Thomas Kuhn: the structure of scientific revolutions, Thomas L Friedman, too big to fail, trade route, undersea cable, uranium enrichment, Washington Consensus, working-age population, yield curve

China waited over six years, from late 2002 to early 2009, before publicly announcing its last increase in official reserves. If China repeats that tempo, the next update to the gold reserve figures can be expected in 2015. Even these estimates based on known mining output and known imports must be qualified by the fact that certain gold imports to China are completely unreported. A senior manager of G4S, one of the world’s leading secure logistics firms, recently revealed to a gold industry executive that he had personally transported gold into China by land through central Asian mountain passes at the head of a column of People’s Liberation Army tanks and armored transport vehicles. This gold was in the form of the 400-ounce “good delivery” bars favored by central banks rather than the smaller one-kilo bars imported through regular channels and favored by retail investors.


Foundation's Edge by Isaac Asimov

anthropic principle, G4S, gravity well

We can certainly study Gaia-S, to begin with, and we can perhaps make a few other observations. —Relax, Janov.” He reached out and slapped the other’s shoulder with an avuncular flourish. After a pause Trevize said, “Gaia-S is a single star or, if it has a companion, that companion is much farther away from it than we are at the present moment and it is, at best, a red dwarf, which means we need not be concerned with it. Gaia-S is a G4 star, which means it is perfectly capable of having a habitable planet, and that’s good. If it were an A or an M, we would have to turn around and leave right now.” Pelorat said, “I may be only a mythologist, but couldn’t we have determined the spectral class of Gaia-S from Sayshell?” “We could and we did, Janov, but it never hurts to check at closer quarters. —Gaia-S has a planetary system, which is no surprise.


pages: 556 words: 141,069

The Profiteers by Sally Denton

Albert Einstein, anti-communist, Ayatollah Khomeini, Bay Area Rapid Transit, Berlin Wall, Boycotts of Israel, clean water, corporate governance, crony capitalism, Donald Trump, Edward Snowden, energy security, Fall of the Berlin Wall, G4S, invisible hand, James Watt: steam engine, Joan Didion, Kitchen Debate, laissez-faire capitalism, Mikhail Gorbachev, mutually assured destruction, Naomi Klein, new economy, nuclear winter, profit motive, Robert Hanssen: Double agent, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, trickle-down economics, uranium enrichment, urban planning, WikiLeaks, wikimedia commons, William Langewiesche

“The fact that”: Eric Schlosser, “Break-In at Y-12: How a Handful of Pacifists and Nuns Exposed the Vulnerability of America’s Nuclear-Weapons Sites,” New Yorker, March 9, 2015. At the time of Sister Megan’s break-in at Y-12 during the summer of 2012, Wackenhut Services, Inc. was responsible for security at the site. A onetime American company, Wackenhut had been acquired by a Group 4 Falck, a British company. G4S, as it was called, was the third-largest private employer in the world, operating private prisons, defending American embassies, and providing security at rock concerts. In July 2014 a consortium headed by Bechtel and Lockheed Martin took over as the operator of Y-12. As of March 2015, Sister Megan was incarcerated at the Metropolitan Detention Center in Brooklyn, where, at eighty-five years old, she was serving out her sentence for her intrusion at Y-12.


pages: 504 words: 143,303

Why We Can't Afford the Rich by Andrew Sayer

accounting loophole / creative accounting, Albert Einstein, anti-globalists, asset-backed security, banking crisis, banks create money, basic income, Boris Johnson, Bretton Woods, British Empire, business cycle, call centre, capital controls, carbon footprint, collective bargaining, corporate raider, corporate social responsibility, creative destruction, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, crony capitalism, David Graeber, David Ricardo: comparative advantage, debt deflation, decarbonisation, declining real wages, deglobalization, deindustrialization, delayed gratification, demand response, don't be evil, Double Irish / Dutch Sandwich, en.wikipedia.org, Etonian, financial innovation, financial intermediation, Fractional reserve banking, full employment, G4S, Goldman Sachs: Vampire Squid, high net worth, income inequality, information asymmetry, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), investor state dispute settlement, Isaac Newton, James Dyson, job automation, Julian Assange, Kickstarter, labour market flexibility, laissez-faire capitalism, land value tax, low skilled workers, Mark Zuckerberg, market fundamentalism, Martin Wolf, mass immigration, means of production, moral hazard, mortgage debt, negative equity, neoliberal agenda, new economy, New Urbanism, Northern Rock, Occupy movement, offshore financial centre, oil shale / tar sands, patent troll, payday loans, Philip Mirowski, plutocrats, Plutocrats, popular capitalism, predatory finance, price stability, pushing on a string, quantitative easing, race to the bottom, rent-seeking, Ronald Reagan, shareholder value, short selling, sovereign wealth fund, Steve Jobs, The Nature of the Firm, The Spirit Level, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thorstein Veblen, too big to fail, transfer pricing, trickle-down economics, universal basic income, unpaid internship, upwardly mobile, Washington Consensus, wealth creators, WikiLeaks, Winter of Discontent, working poor, Yom Kippur War, zero-sum game

It’s now become a venue for side meetings to address major geopolitical issues – like the Syrian crisis. Evidently a global plutocrats’ forum is seen as an appropriate setting for them; at least business interests will be represented. (Well, plutocrat politicians are there anyway, so why not make global diplomacy come to them?) And business has major interests in wars, particularly resource wars, as was so clear in Halliburton’s, G4S’s and other companies’ involvement in the Iraq war. Meanwhile, the governed are kept at bay through massive security. Noam Chomsky contrasts the WEF with the alternative World Social Forum: The dominant propaganda systems have appropriated the term ‘globalization’ to refer to the specific version of international economic integration that they favor, which privileges the rights of investors and lenders, those of people being incidental.


pages: 498 words: 145,708

Consumed: How Markets Corrupt Children, Infantilize Adults, and Swallow Citizens Whole by Benjamin R. Barber

addicted to oil, AltaVista, American ideology, Berlin Wall, Bertrand Russell: In Praise of Idleness, Bill Gates: Altair 8800, business cycle, Celebration, Florida, collective bargaining, creative destruction, David Brooks, delayed gratification, Donald Trump, double entry bookkeeping, G4S, game design, George Gilder, Gordon Gekko, greed is good, Hernando de Soto, illegal immigration, informal economy, invisible hand, Joseph Schumpeter, laissez-faire capitalism, late capitalism, liberal capitalism, Marc Andreessen, McJob, microcredit, Naomi Klein, new economy, New Journalism, Norbert Wiener, nuclear winter, Panopticon Jeremy Bentham, pattern recognition, presumed consent, profit motive, race to the bottom, Ralph Nader, road to serfdom, Robert Bork, Ronald Reagan, Saturday Night Live, Silicon Valley, spice trade, Steve Jobs, telemarketer, The Fortune at the Bottom of the Pyramid, the market place, The Wisdom of Crowds, Thomas L Friedman, Thorstein Veblen, trade route, X Prize

Addiction itself is commodity based: no addiction therapy without web-based health sites and self-help books and novel medications aimed at depression or bipolarity or anorexia or the latest illness of the week that can be associated with addiction. To need and to shop become synonyms: “I Shop, Therefore I Am,” wails April Lane Benson, editor of the self-consciously Cartesian takeoff subtitled “Compulsive Buying and the Search for Self.”52 Apple computers are thus being sold under the slogan “What G4 are you?” And even Porsche is blurring the boundaries between consumer choice and what sounds like addiction: “Suddenly the line between want and need seems so arbitrary” runs the tag line for Porsche’s new Cayman S (a car also featured in the television series The Sopranos), followed by this afterthought: “Priorities give way to pure desire.” What this means is that for every discretionary want converted into a pure desire need, a dollar is somewhere earned; and for every need converted into an addiction identified, two dollars are earned over and over again—one for the addictive purchase and the second for the addiction treatment.


The Cigarette: A Political History by Sarah Milov

activist lawyer, affirmative action, airline deregulation, American Legislative Exchange Council, barriers to entry, British Empire, collective bargaining, corporate personhood, deindustrialization, fixed income, Frederick Winslow Taylor, G4S, global supply chain, imperial preference, Indoor air pollution, information asymmetry, invisible hand, Kitchen Debate, land tenure, new economy, New Journalism, Philip Mirowski, pink-collar, Potemkin village, precariat, price stability, profit maximization, race to the bottom, Ralph Nader, rent-seeking, Silicon Valley, structural adjustment programs, The Chicago School, Torches of Freedom, trade route, union organizing, Unsafe at Any Speed, Upton Sinclair, War on Poverty, women in the workforce

“Number of Local Actions on Smoking Restrictions, 1971–1976,” October 1976, Tobacco Institute Records, UCSF Library, https://www.industrydocumentslibrary.ucsf.edu/tobacco/docs/ppwl0004. 134. Horace R. Kornegay, “Remarks—TI Spring Meeting,” 1974, Philip Morris Records, UCSF Library, https://www.industrydocumentslibrary.ucsf.edu/tobacco/docs/ytgc0107. 135. “Smoking Ban Has Berkeley Residents Smoldering,” Chicago Tribune, August 21, 1977. 136. Francis Ward, “Chicago Antismoking Law: Smokers Court Punishes Public Puffers,” Los Angeles Times, May 2, 1976, G4. Although African-American men smoked at higher rates than white men—55 percent versus 42 percent in 1974—behavioral discrepancies could not account for the demography of smokers’ court. See “Smoking and Health: A Report of the Surgeon General: Appendix: Cigarette Smoking in the United States, 1950–1978” (U.S. Public Health Service, Office on Smoking and Health, 1979), A-15. 6.   From Rights to Cost 1.


pages: 456 words: 185,658

More Guns, Less Crime: Understanding Crime and Gun-Control Laws by John R. Lott

affirmative action, Columbine, crack epidemic, Donald Trump, Edward Glaeser, G4S, gun show loophole, income per capita, More Guns, Less Crime, Sam Peltzman, selection bias, statistical model, the medium is the message, transaction costs

That afternoon, Latta bought an illegal $20 semiautomatic pistol on the street. Five hours later, her ex-boyfriend attacked her outside her house. She shot him dead. The county prosecutor decided not to prosecute Latta for either the selfdefense homicide or the illegal gun. (Quoted from David B. Kopel, “Guns and Crime: Does Restricting Firearms Really Reduce Violence?” San Diego Union-Tribune, May 9, 1993, p. G4.) For another example where a woman’s ability to defend herself would have been impaired by a waiting period, see “Waiting Period Law Might Have Cost Mother’s Life,” USA Today, May 27, 1994, p. 10A. 388 | N OT E S TO PA G E S 9 4 – 1 0 7 43. Quoted in David Armstrong, “Cities’ Crime Moves to Suburbs,” Boston Globe, May 19, 1997, pp. 1 and B6. CHAPTER FIVE 1. While county-level data were provided in the Supplementary Homicide Reports, matching these county observations with those used in the Uniform Crime Reports proved unusually difficult.


pages: 845 words: 197,050

The Gun by C. J. Chivers

air freight, Berlin Wall, British Empire, cuban missile crisis, defense in depth, G4S, illegal immigration, joint-stock company, Khartoum Gordon, mutually assured destruction, offshore financial centre, Ponzi scheme, RAND corporation, South China Sea, trade route, Transnistria

“Memorandum for Record, Debrief of Colt’s Vietnam Field Representative—Mr. Kanemitsu Ito,” December 28, 1967. Prepared by Lieutenant Colonel Robert C. Engle, Project Manager Staff Officer, Rifles. 96. Personal communication to author by Paul A. Benke. 97. Lewis Sorley, A Better War: The Unexamined Victories and Final Tragedy of America’s Last Years in Vietnam (Harcourt Books, 1999), p. 164. 98. “Memorandum for Army Chief of Staff, G4, Fact Finding Visit to 199th Infantry Brigade,” March 28, 1968, by Lieutenant Colonel Robert L. Semmler, Chief, PM Rifles, Vietnam Field Office. 99. Personal communication to author from Jack Beavers. 100. Contents of tape recording received from K. Ito and J. Fitzgerald, September 27, 1968. 101. Letter from John S. Foster, Director of Defense Research and Engineering, to Representative L. Mendel Rivers, chairman of the House Armed Services Committee, February 2, 1968.


pages: 828 words: 205,338

Write Great Code, Volume 2 by Randall Hyde

complexity theory, Donald Knuth, G4S, locality of reference, NP-complete, premature optimization

Here is a list of the command-line options that MSVC++ provides to control optimization: -OPTIMIZATION- /O1 minimize space /Op[-] improve floating-pt consistency /O2 maximize speed /Os favor code space /Oa assume no aliasing /Ot favor code speed /Ob<n> inline expansion (default n=0) /Ow assume cross-function aliasing /Od disable optimizations (default) /Ox maximum opts. (/Ogityb1 /Gs) /Og enable global optimization /Oy[-] enable frame pointer omission /Oi enable intrinsic functions -CODE GENERATION- /G3 optimize for 80386 /Gy separate functions for linker /G4 optimize for 80486 /Ge force stack checking for all funcs /G5 optimize for Pentium /Gs[num] disable stack checking calls /G6 optimize for Pentium Pro /Gh enable hook function call /GB optimize for blended model (default) /GR[-] enable C++ RTTI /Gd __cdecl calling convention /GX[-] enable C++ EH (same as /EHsc) /Gr __fastcall calling convention /Gi[-] enable incremental compilation /Gz __stdcall calling convention /Gm[-] enable minimal rebuild /GA optimize for Windows application /EHs enable synchronous C++ EH /GD optimize for Windows DLL /EHa enable asynchronous C++ EH /Gf enable string pooling /EHc extern "C" defaults to nothrow /GF enable read-only string pooling /QIfdiv[-] enable Pentium FDIV fix /GZ enable runtime debug checks /QI0f[-] enable Pentium 0x0f fix GCC has a comparable, though much longer list, that you can view by specifying -v --help on the GCC command line.


pages: 1,088 words: 228,743

Expected Returns: An Investor's Guide to Harvesting Market Rewards by Antti Ilmanen

Andrei Shleifer, asset allocation, asset-backed security, availability heuristic, backtesting, balance sheet recession, bank run, banking crisis, barriers to entry, Bernie Madoff, Black Swan, Bretton Woods, business cycle, buy and hold, buy low sell high, capital asset pricing model, capital controls, Carmen Reinhart, central bank independence, collateralized debt obligation, commoditize, commodity trading advisor, corporate governance, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, debt deflation, deglobalization, delta neutral, demand response, discounted cash flows, disintermediation, diversification, diversified portfolio, dividend-yielding stocks, equity premium, Eugene Fama: efficient market hypothesis, fiat currency, financial deregulation, financial innovation, financial intermediation, fixed income, Flash crash, framing effect, frictionless, frictionless market, G4S, George Akerlof, global reserve currency, Google Earth, high net worth, hindsight bias, Hyman Minsky, implied volatility, income inequality, incomplete markets, index fund, inflation targeting, information asymmetry, interest rate swap, invisible hand, Kenneth Rogoff, laissez-faire capitalism, law of one price, London Interbank Offered Rate, Long Term Capital Management, loss aversion, margin call, market bubble, market clearing, market friction, market fundamentalism, market microstructure, mental accounting, merger arbitrage, mittelstand, moral hazard, Myron Scholes, negative equity, New Journalism, oil shock, p-value, passive investing, Paul Samuelson, performance metric, Ponzi scheme, prediction markets, price anchoring, price stability, principal–agent problem, private sector deleveraging, purchasing power parity, quantitative easing, quantitative trading / quantitative finance, random walk, reserve currency, Richard Thaler, risk tolerance, risk-adjusted returns, risk/return, riskless arbitrage, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, savings glut, selection bias, Sharpe ratio, short selling, sovereign wealth fund, statistical arbitrage, statistical model, stochastic volatility, stocks for the long run, survivorship bias, systematic trading, The Great Moderation, The Myth of the Rational Market, too big to fail, transaction costs, tulip mania, value at risk, volatility arbitrage, volatility smile, working-age population, Y2K, yield curve, zero-coupon bond, zero-sum game

Realized and expected inflation series share similar contours—the postwar mountain shape (the 1960s’ and 1970s’ uptrend and the 1980s’ and 1990s’ downtrend). Before 1978 no forecasts of long-term inflation are available so I use one-year-ahead inflation forecasts or time series estimates by Fed researchers instead. Figure 9.9. Expected 10-year real yield scatterplotted on expected long-term inflation rates for G4 markets, 1983–2009. Sources: Bloomberg, Haver Analytics, Blue Chip Economic Indicators, Consensus Economics. • Inflation uncertainty. Realized time series volatility of inflation and bond yields likewise show a peak around 1980 and later fall sharply. More relevant measures include option-based implied volatility, dispersion among many forecasters, and self-reported inflation uncertainty (individual forecasters’ wide probability density)


pages: 728 words: 233,687

My Boring-Ass Life: The Uncomfortably Candid Diary of Kevin Smith by Kevin Smith

back-to-the-land, British Empire, Burning Man, G4S, Kickstarter, mutually assured destruction, post-work, pre–internet, Saturday Night Live, Silicon Valley, Wall-E

I give him back his laptop and jump online on my desk-top, hell-bent on buying a downloadable version of Virtual PC for Mac (UB isn’t a Mac-friendly site) so that I, too, can become part of the poker action. Problem is, I can’t find anyone selling it for instant download. My only option is to head over to the Mac Store, but I dare not attempt it, lest Jen rip my head off for trying to do something other than getting ready for the Poetry Event. I IM Matt Potter who’s got Virtual PC on the G4 desk-top I bought him last year in exchange for editing the Tea Party doc, so he uploads a copy to our server site. While it’s downloading, I’m playing at the site on Mewes’s laptop. Jen comes in to the office to tell me it’s time to get showered and ready for the Poetry Event. After two warnings, I do so, and air-dry at the desk-top while I pull together some notes for each speaker’s intro, as well as some opening remarks.


Lonely Planet Norway by Lonely Planet

carbon footprint, cashless society, centre right, energy security, G4S, illegal immigration, Kickstarter, low cost airline, mass immigration, North Sea oil, place-making, trade route, urban renewal, white picket fence

VitensenteretMUSEUM ( MAP GOOGLE MAP ; www.vitensenteret.com; Kongens gate 1; adult/child/family 95/50/330kr; h10am-5pm Mon-Fri, 11am-5pm Sat & Sun late Jun–mid-Aug, 10am-4pm Mon-Fri, 11am-5pm Sat & Sun rest of year; c) Children especially will enjoy the hands-on experiments at this practical, active centre with over 150 models to choose from. Ringve Music MuseumMUSEUM ( GOOGLE MAP ; %73 87 02 80; www.ringve.no; Lade Allé 60; adult/child 120kr/free; h10am-5pm May-Aug, 11am-4pm Tue-Sun Sep-Apr; g3, g4) The Ringve Museum is Norway's national museum for music and musical instruments. The Russian-born owner was a devoted collector of rare and antique musical instruments, which students demonstrate. You can also browse the old barn with its rich collection of instruments from around the world. The botanic gardens, set within the surrounding 18th-century estate, are a quiet green setting for a stroll.


Spain by Lonely Planet Publications, Damien Simonis

Atahualpa, business process, call centre, centre right, Colonization of Mars, discovery of the americas, Francisco Pizarro, Frank Gehry, G4S, glass ceiling, Guggenheim Bilbao, haute couture, haute cuisine, illegal immigration, intermodal, Islamic Golden Age, land reform, large denomination, low cost airline, place-making, Skype, trade route, upwardly mobile, urban planning, urban renewal, urban sprawl, Winter of Discontent, young professional

Breathtaking and accessible limestone ranges with distinctive craggy peaks (usually hot climbing destinations, too) include Spain’s first national park, the Picos de Europa (Click here), which straddles the Cantabria, Asturias and León provinces and is fast gaining a reputation as the place to walk in Spain. Less well known, but just as rewarding, are Valencia’s Els Ports area (Click here), and the Sierra de Cazorla (Click here) and Sierra de Grazalema (Click here) in Andalucía. To walk in mountain villages, the classic spot is Las Alpujarras (Click here), near the Parque Nacional Sierra Nevada in Andalucía. Galicia has some interesting possibilities, including the Camino Real (PR-G4; Click here) in the monastery-laden natural paradise of A Ribeira Sacra. The Pyrenean foothills in Navarra offer superb village-to-village hiking, in particular around the oh-so-pretty Valle del Baztán (Click here). * * * With an average altitude of 660m, Spain is the second-highest country in Europe, after Switzerland. * * * Great coastal walking abounds, even in heavily visited areas such as the south coast (try Cabo de Gata; Click here) and Mallorca (Click here).

Ourense to A Teixera Take the wide OU-536 highway about 15km east of Ourense to Tarreirigo to pick up the OU-0509, a winding country land that meanders through moss-laden forests. Veer right at the sign for Luintra and the first stop, the Mosteiro de San Pedro de Rocas, a monastery whose 6th-century chapel was hewn out of the mountainside. You can’t enter, but the wide gates let you see inside. The monastery is located along the beautiful Camino Real (Royal Path; aka PR-G4), a 9km/two-hour circuit that loops around the area. Back on the highway, continue towards Luintra and veer right on the OU-0508 towards the Benedictine Mosteiro San Estevo (opposite) now a Parador Hotel. Though a monastery may have stood here as early as the 6th century, the mammoth construction you see today dates to the 12th century and was greatly modified through the years, with three magnificent cloisters (one Romanesque, one Gothic, one Renaissance) and an 18th-century baroque facade.


God Created the Integers: The Mathematical Breakthroughs That Changed History by Stephen Hawking

Alan Turing: On Computable Numbers, with an Application to the Entscheidungsproblem, Albert Einstein, Antoine Gombaud: Chevalier de Méré, Augustin-Louis Cauchy, British Empire, Edmond Halley, Eratosthenes, Fellow of the Royal Society, G4S, Georg Cantor, Henri Poincaré, Isaac Newton, Johannes Kepler, John von Neumann, p-value, Pierre-Simon Laplace, Richard Feynman, Stephen Hawking, Turing machine

It is easy to prove that if r is a biquadratic residue of 8n + 1, the value of the expression 1/r (mod. 8n + 1) will also be such a residue. So all biquadratic residues can be distributed into classes just as we distributed quadratic residues in article 109, and the rest of the demonstration proceeds in almost the same way as it did there. III. Let g4 ≡ −1, and h the value of the expression 1/g (mod. 8n + 1). Then we will have (g ± h)2 = g2 + h2 ± 2gh ≡ g2 + h2 ± 2 (because gh ≡ 1). But g4 ≡ −1 and so − h2 ≡ g4h2 ≡ g2. Thus g2 + h2 ≡ 0 and (g ± h)2 ≡ ±2; i.e. both +2 and −2 are quadric residues 8n + 1. Q.E.D. 116. From what precedes we can easily deduce the following general rule: +2 is a residue of any number that cannot be divided by 4 or by any prime of the form 8n + 3 or 8n + 5, and a nonresidue of all others (e.g. of all numbers of the forms 8n + 3, 8n + 5 whether they are prime or composite); −2 is a residue of any number that cannot be divided by 4 or by any prime of the form 8n + 5 or 8n + 7, and a nonresidue of all others.


pages: 3,292 words: 537,795

Lonely Planet China (Travel Guide) by Lonely Planet, Shawn Low

Albert Einstein, anti-communist, bike sharing scheme, carbon footprint, clean water, colonial rule, credit crunch, Deng Xiaoping, G4S, haute couture, haute cuisine, income inequality, indoor plumbing, Kickstarter, land reform, mass immigration, Pearl River Delta, place-making, Rubik’s Cube, Skype, South China Sea, special economic zone, sustainable-tourism, trade route, upwardly mobile, urban planning, urban renewal, urban sprawl, women in the workforce, Xiaogang Anhui farmers, young professional

Taishan International Youth HostelHOSTEL (Taishan Guoji Qingnian Lushe MAP GOOGLE MAP ; %628 5196; 65 Tongtian Jie; dm ¥50-70, s & d ¥188; aiW; g1, 4, 7, 8, 17) Tai’an’s first youth hostel has clean spartan rooms with pine furnishings and old propaganda posters. Bike rental, free laundry and a bar on the 4th floor make this a pleasant experience. Look for the pair of arches just off Tongtian Jie. Discounts get rooms down to ¥128. Yuzuo HotelHOTEL (Yuzuo Binguan MAP GOOGLE MAP ; %826 9999; www.yuzuo.cn; 50 Daimiao Beilu; s & d ¥780, ste ¥1680; aW; g4, 6) This pretty hotel next to the Dai Temple’s north gate was purposely kept to two storeys out of respect for its neighbour. Deluxe rooms are decked out imperial style; cheaper rooms are rather ordinary. The attached bakery and restaurants serve Taoist food (12 courses ¥168 per person). Discounts of 50% make this a good deal. Ramada Plaza Tai'anHOTEL (Dongzun Huameida Dajiudian MAP GOOGLE MAP ; %836 8888; www.ramadaplazataian.com; 16 Yingsheng Donglu, s & d ¥1160-1400, ste ¥1960-3360; naWs; g8) The town’s first five-star hotel is in the northwest and has all the usual comforts plus fantastic views of the main attraction.

Built around 1888, it's dedicated to the child god of war to halt the plague occurring at that time. The wall outside, often said to be a section of Macau's old city walls, in fact belonged to the former St Paul’s College located at the ruins. Ox WarehouseARTS CENTRE (Armazem de Boi MAP GOOGLE MAP ; %2853 0026; http://oxwarehouse.blogspot.com; cnr Avenida do Coronel Mesquita & Avenida do Almirante Lacerda; hnoon-7pm Wed-Mon; g4, 5, 25, 26A, 33) This atmospheric former slaughterhouse is run by a nonprofit that hosts contemporary exhibitions, workshops and performances by local and visiting artists. Much of the work is engagingly experiential. Even if nothing's on, the architecture of the old buildings here makes it worthwhile to come for a peek. oAFA (Art for All Society)GALLERY ( MAP GOOGLE MAP ; %2836 6064; www.afamacau.com; 3rd fl, Edificio da Fabrica de Baterias N E National, 52 Estrada da Areia Preta; hnoon-7pm Mon-Sat; g8, 8A, 18A, 7) Macau’s best contemporary art can be seen at this nonprofit gallery, which has taken Macau's art worldwide and holds monthly solo exhibitions by Macau’s top artists.


Hawaii by Jeff Campbell

airport security, big-box store, California gold rush, carbon footprint, centre right, Charles Lindbergh, commoditize, creative destruction, Drosophila, G4S, haute couture, land reform, lateral thinking, low-wage service sector, Maui Hawaii, polynesian navigation, risk/return, sustainable-tourism, upwardly mobile, urban sprawl, wage slave, white picket fence

Breakfast is also great here, with eggs Benedict and a heavy breakfast burrito that will keep even the perpetually hungry pretty full. Also choose from a smattering of homemade desserts – perfect for picnic lunches to take to the beach. Hanalei Dolphin Fish Market (826-6113; 5-5016 Kuhio Hwy; lunches $12-14; sushi rolls $10-14; 10am-7pm) Grab your poke and plate lunches here. Kalypso Island Bar & Grill (826-9700; www.kalypsokauai.com; G4-5156 Kuhio Hwy; mains $12-30; 11am-9pm) Ambience and sincere, attentive service make the ‘Hawaiian’ pub fare (aloha, coconut shrimp!) easier to take. Postcards Café (826-1191; www.postcardscafé.com; 5-5075 Kuhio Hwy; mains $18-27; 6-9pm) Postcards has a cottagelike ambience and its pupu platter is worth a try, with taro fritters, seafood rockets, summer rolls and seared ahi. Bouchons (826-9701; www.sushiandblues.com; Ching Young Village; sushi rolls $8-16; 6pm-2am, sushi bar noon-9pm, happy hour 3:30-5:30pm) The service isn’t all that attentive, but if you’ve got a hankering for sushi and sake, this is the place to get it.


pages: 1,009 words: 329,520

The Last Tycoons: The Secret History of Lazard Frères & Co. by William D. Cohan

activist fund / activist shareholder / activist investor, bank run, carried interest, cognitive dissonance, commoditize, computer age, corporate governance, corporate raider, creative destruction, credit crunch, diversification, Donald Trump, East Village, fear of failure, fixed income, G4S, hiring and firing, interest rate swap, intermodal, Joseph Schumpeter, late fees, Long Term Capital Management, Marc Andreessen, market bubble, offshore financial centre, Ponzi scheme, Ralph Nader, Ralph Waldo Emerson, rolodex, Ronald Reagan, shareholder value, The Nature of the Firm, the new new thing, Yogi Berra

Jacobs told him, though, there may be another way. "I said, 'What are you talking about?' and he says, 'Well, Michel's got a plane.' So then it starts unfolding." After the July 2000 crash of the Concorde outside of Paris, where 113 people died--resulting in the suspension of Concorde travel and an unfounded rumor that Felix, then the ambassador, was on that flight--Michel had arranged to lease a Gulfstream jet, a G4. Michel, of course, needed to easily get back and forth from New York, Paris, and London, and with the Concorde no longer reliably available, he joined the ranks of the other billionaires with their own private jets. After September 11, in the same way that Osama bin Laden's family members were allowed to return on a private jet to Saudi Arabia from the United States, Michel's wife was permitted to fly on September 13 to Paris from New York on Michel's jet.


pages: 1,123 words: 328,357

Post Wall: Rebuilding the World After 1989 by Kristina Spohr

American Legislative Exchange Council, Andrei Shleifer, anti-communist, banking crisis, Berlin Wall, Bonfire of the Vanities, Bretton Woods, central bank independence, colonial exploitation, Deng Xiaoping, Dissolution of the Soviet Union, Donald Trump, Doomsday Clock, facts on the ground, failed state, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, G4S, Kickstarter, mass immigration, means of production, Mikhail Gorbachev, open economy, price stability, rising living standards, Ronald Reagan, Ronald Reagan: Tear down this wall, software patent, South China Sea, special economic zone, Thomas L Friedman, Transnistria, uranium enrichment, zero-coupon bond

GHWBPL Memcon of Opening Session of the 16th Economic Summit of Industrialised Nations (G7), Monday 9.7.1990 Founders Room Rice University Houston p. 2. TNA UK PREM 19/2945 cover note – Powell to Wicks (Treasury) 31.7.1990: Houston Economic Summit + Record of the Heads Discussion (Monday 9.7.1990) pp. 1–34 here esp. pp. 1–3 Back to text 175. R. W. Apple Jr ‘US Pushes to End Farming Subsidies’ NYT 10.7.1990. See GHWBPL Memcon of Bush–Delors talks 8.7.1990 Astro-Arena Houston pp. 1–5 esp p. 4. Bush and Delors (as well as the European G4) also quibbled over the role of the EBRD in the assessment of the Soviet economic reform programme before offering any further financial assistance. Generally while in Bush’s words ‘it is impossible for the US to loan money to USSR at this time’, the Europeans were much less reluctant to refuse aid. As Mitterrand put it ‘The EC, which is not unanimous, wants to contribute aid to the USSR.’ See also GHWBPL Memcon of First Main Plenary Session of the 16th Economic Summit of Industrialised Nations (G7) Tuesday 10.7.1990 O’Conner Room – Herring Hall Rice University Houston pp. 4–5; and Memcon of Second Main Plenary Session of the 16th Economic Summit of Industrialised Nations (G7) Tuesday 10.7.1990 O’Conner Room – Herring Hall Rice University Houston pp. 10–13 Back to text 176.